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Science Learning Science Teaching

Author: Jerry Wellington
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317225961
Size: 14.90 MB
Format: PDF
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Now fully updated in its fourth edition, Science Learning, Science Teaching offers an accessible, practical guide to creative classroom teaching and a comprehensive introduction to contemporary issues in science education. Aiming to encourage and assist professionals with the process of reflection in the science classroom, the new edition re-examines the latest advances in the field and changes to the curriculum, and explores the use of mobile technology and coding, and its impact on ICT in science education. With extra tasks integrated throughout the book and a brand new chapter, ‘Working scientifically’, to help develop learners’ investigative skills, key topics include: • The art and craft of science teaching. • The science curriculum and science in the curriculum. • Planning and managing learning. • Inclusive science education. • Laboratory safety in science learning and teaching. • Language and numeracy in science teaching and learning. • Computers and computing in science education. • Citizenship and sustainability in science education. Including points for reflection and useful information about further reading and recommended websites, Science Learning, Science Teaching is an essential source of support, guidance and inspiration for all students, teachers, mentors and those involved in science education wishing to reflect upon, improve and enrich their practice.

Reframing Science Teaching And Learning

Author: David Stroupe
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317272811
Size: 53.47 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Responding to recent reform efforts, such as the Next Generation Science Standards, which call for students to learn science practices, this book proposes a conceptual reframing of the roles of teachers and students in formal and informal science learning settings. Inviting the field to examine the state of "science practice," it provides concrete examples of how students, supported by the actions of educators, take on new roles, shifting from passive recipients of information to active participants in conceptual, social, epistemic, and material features of science work. Each chapter provides an examination of how and why science practice evolves in learning communities in which students and teachers negotiate disciplinary work; an analysis of how specific pedagogical and social actions taken by someone with authority (a teacher or other educator) provides opportunities for students to shape science practices; a set of concrete recommendations for working with young students in formal and informal learning settings; and a set of suggestions and questions to catalyze future research about and the evolving relationships between educators, students, and science practices in the field of science education. Showing how and why the conceptual ideas presented are important, and providing specific, actionable suggestions for teachers and other educators for their daily work, this book includes both elementary and secondary learning sites.

Place Based Science Teaching And Learning

Author: Cory A. Buxton
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1452238065
Size: 18.70 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Forty classroom-ready science teaching and learning activities for elementary and middle school teachers Grounded in theory and best-practices research, this practical text provides elementary and middle school teachers with 40 place-based activities that will help them to make science learning relevant to their students. This text provides teachers with both a rationale and a set of strategies and activities for teaching science in a local context to help students engage with science learning and come to understand the importance of science in their everyday lives.

Teaching And Learning About Science

Author: Derek Hodson
Publisher: Sense Pub
ISBN: 9789460910517
Size: 54.92 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Findings generated by recent research in science education, international debate on the guiding purposes of science education and the nature of scientific and technological literacy, official and semi-official reports on science education (including recommendations from prestigious organizations such as AAAS and UNESCO), and concerns expressed by scientists, environmentalists and engineers about current science education provision and the continuing low levels of scientific attainment among the general population, have led to some radical re-thinking of the nature of the science curriculum. There has been a marked shift of rhetorical emphasis in the direction of considerations of the nature of science, model-based reasoning, inquiry-based learning, scientific argumentation and the use of language-rich learning experiences (reading, writing, talking) to enhance concept acquisition and development. These findings, arguments and pronouncements seem to point very clearly in the direction of regarding science education as a study of scientific practice. This book presents a comprehensive, research-based account of how such a vision could be assembled into a coherent curriculum and presented to students in ways that are meaningful, motivating and successful. The author takes what might be described as an anthropological approach in which scientists are studied as a socially, economically and politically important community of people. This group has its own distinctive language, body of knowledge, investigative methods, history, traditions, norms and values, each of which can be studied explicitly, systematically and reflectively. This particular approach was chosen for the powerful theoretical overview it provides and for its motivational value, especially for students from sociocultural groups currently under-served by science education and under-represented in science. The book, which is both timely and important, is written for teachers, student teachers, graduate students in education, teacher educators, curriculum developers and those responsible for educational policy. It has the potential to impact very substantially on both pre-service and inservice science teacher education programmes and to shift school science education practice strongly in the direction currently being advocated by prominent science educators. The author is Emeritus Professor of Science Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, Adjunct Professor of Science Education at the University of Auckland, and Visiting Professor at the University of Hong Kong. His major research interests include: history, philosophy & sociology of science and its implications for science education; STSE education and the politicization of science education; science curriculum history; multicultural and antiracist education; and science teacher education via action research.

Teaching And Learning Secondary Science

Author: Jerry Wellington
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134612192
Size: 15.64 MB
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A comprehensive and critical guide for new and experienced teachers on the teaching and learning of science. It combines an overview of current research with an account of curriculum changes to provide a valuable and practical guide to the business of classroom teaching.

Deep Knowledge

Author: Douglas B. Larkin
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807754218
Size: 21.46 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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EDUCATION / Teaching Methods & Materials / Science & Technology

Learning Science Teaching Developing A Professional Knowledge Base

Author: Bishop, Keith
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)
ISBN: 0335222358
Size: 28.75 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The book argues that highly accomplished science teachers are also continually learning science teachers. It stresses the importance of learning through others, by participation in communities of science practitioners, as well as individual learning through classroom research.

Ambitious Science Teaching

Author: Mark Windschitl
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781682531631
Size: 71.97 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The book is addressed to classroom science teachers, both beginning and experienced. It is a guide to using four core practices to improve instruction using Ambitious Science Teaching methods.--

Science Learning And Instruction

Author: Marcia C. Linn
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136655972
Size: 27.71 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 2016
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Science Learning and Instruction describes advances in understanding the nature of science learning and their implications for the design of science instruction. The authors show how design patterns, design principles, and professional development opportunities coalesce to create and sustain effective instruction in each primary scientific domain: earth science, life science, and physical science. Calling for more in depth and less fleeting coverage of science topics in order to accomplish knowledge integration, the book highlights the importance of designing the instructional materials, the examples that are introduced in each scientific domain, and the professional development that accompanies these materials. It argues that unless all these efforts are made simultaneously, educators cannot hope to improve science learning outcomes. The book also addresses how many policies, including curriculum, standards, guidelines, and standardized tests, work against the goal of integrative understanding, and discusses opportunities to rethink science education policies based on research findings from instruction that emphasizes such understanding.

The Art Of Teaching Science

Author: Jack Hassard
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135890005
Size: 17.76 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The Art of Teaching Science emphasizes a humanistic, experiential, and constructivist approach to teaching and learning, and integrates a wide variety of pedagogical tools. Becoming a science teacher is a creative process, and this innovative textbook encourages students to construct ideas about science teaching through their interactions with peers, mentors, and instructors, and through hands-on, minds-on activities designed to foster a collaborative, thoughtful learning environment. This second edition retains key features such as inquiry-based activities and case studies throughout, while simultaneously adding new material on the impact of standardized testing on inquiry-based science, and explicit links to science teaching standards. Also included are expanded resources like a comprehensive website, a streamlined format and updated content, making the experiential tools in the book even more useful for both pre- and in-service science teachers. Special Features: Each chapter is organized into two sections: one that focuses on content and theme; and one that contains a variety of strategies for extending chapter concepts outside the classroom Case studies open each chapter to highlight real-world scenarios and to connect theory to teaching practice Contains 33 Inquiry Activities that provide opportunities to explore the dimensions of science teaching and increase professional expertise Problems and Extensions, On the Web Resources and Readings guide students to further critical investigation of important concepts and topics. An extensive companion website includes even more student and instructor resources, such as interviews with practicing science teachers, articles from the literature, chapter PowerPoint slides, syllabus helpers, additional case studies, activities, and more. Visit http://www.routledge.com/textbooks/9780415965286 to access this additional material.