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Sea Level Rise

Author: Bruce Douglas
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 9780080516790
Size: 80.66 MB
Format: PDF
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Sea Level Rise, History and Consequences includes a special emphasis on the evidence for historical sea level change; case studies are used to demonstrate the resulting consequences. A CD-ROM is included which contain tide gauge data and trends of relative sea level from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level. The material on the CD-ROM is either in the form of text files, or web sites that can be opened by widely available web-browsers. Sea level is expected to rise as much as 60-100 centimeters over the next century due to greenhouse-induced global warming -- or at least that is what the some scientists predict. However, the concept of sea level is extremely complex, which makes the prediction of sea level rise anything but certain. The reviewers are in consensus in enthusiastically endorsing this comprehensive book and CD-ROM treatment. This book will be a comprehensive review of the subject using the data themselves (on CD-ROM) to illustrate the principles involved, rather than detailed mathematical treatments. The book should be readily accessible to upper division and first-year graduate students in the environmental sciences, geography, geology, and other interdisciplinary fields. Four pages (up to 16 pages) of color in the printed text. The book will have wide appeal. It will be read by geologists, geophysicists, climatologists, oceanographers, meteorologists, environmental scientists, geomorphologists, coastal engineers, and policy makers in all of these fields.

Sea Level Rise For The Coasts Of California Oregon And Washington

Author: Committee on Sea Level Rise in California, Oregon, and Washington
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309255953
Size: 67.62 MB
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Tide gages show that global sea level has risen about 7 inches during the 20th century, and recent satellite data show that the rate of sea-level rise is accelerating. As Earth warms, sea levels are rising mainly because ocean water expands as it warms; and water from melting glaciers and ice sheets is flowing into the ocean. Sea-level rise poses enormous risks to the valuable infrastructure, development, and wetlands that line much of the 1,600 mile shoreline of California, Oregon, and Washington. As those states seek to incorporate projections of sea-level rise into coastal planning, they asked the National Research Council to make independent projections of sea-level rise along their coasts for the years 2030, 2050, and 2100, taking into account regional factors that affect sea level. Sea-Level Rise for the Coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington: Past, Present, and Future explains that sea level along the U.S. west coast is affected by a number of factors. These include: climate patterns such as the El Niño, effects from the melting of modern and ancient ice sheets, and geologic processes, such as plate tectonics. Regional projections for California, Oregon, and Washington show a sharp distinction at Cape Mendocino in northern California. South of that point, sea-level rise is expected to be very close to global projections. However, projections are lower north of Cape Mendocino because the land is being pushed upward as the ocean plate moves under the continental plate along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. However, an earthquake magnitude 8 or larger, which occurs in the region every few hundred to 1,000 years, would cause the land to drop and sea level to suddenly rise.

New Frontiers In Environmental Research

Author: Mark P. Glazer
Publisher: Nova Publishers
ISBN: 9781600211713
Size: 47.21 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The environment is considered the surroundings in which an organism operates, including air, water, land, natural resources, flora, fauna, humans and their interrelation. It is this environment which is both so valuable, on the one hand, and so endangered on the other. And it is people which are by and large ruining the environment both for themselves and for all other organisms. This book reviews the latest research in this field which is vital for everyone.

Sea Level Change

Author: National Research Council (U.S.). Geophysics Study Committee
Publisher: National Academies
ISBN:
Size: 65.18 MB
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Sea-level rise may be one of the consequences of global warming. To understand changes in sea level caused by the "greenhouse effect," we must understand the factors that have caused the sea level to fluctuate significantly throughout history. This new volume explores current views among scientists on the causes and mechanisms of sea-level change. The authors examine measurement programs and make recommendations aimed at improving our understanding of the factors that affect sea level. It will be welcomed by scientists, engineers, and policymakers concerned about "greenhouse" issues and sea-level change, the environmental community, researchers, and students.

Coastal Fluxes In The Anthropocene

Author: Christopher J. Crossland
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9783540254508
Size: 42.55 MB
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This book synthesizes knowledge of coastal and riverine material fluxes, biogeochemical processes and indications of change, both natural, and increasingly human-initiated. Here, the authors assess coastal flux in the past and present, and in future under the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP), the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP) and the LOICZ II (Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone) Project.

Useless Arithmetic

Author: Orrin H. Pilkey
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231506996
Size: 73.67 MB
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Noted coastal geologist Orrin Pilkey and environmental scientist Linda Pilkey-Jarvis show that the quantitative mathematical models policy makers and government administrators use to form environmental policies are seriously flawed. Based on unrealistic and sometimes false assumptions, these models often yield answers that support unwise policies. Writing for the general, nonmathematician reader and using examples from throughout the environmental sciences, Pilkey and Pilkey-Jarvis show how unquestioned faith in mathematical models can blind us to the hard data and sound judgment of experienced scientific fieldwork. They begin with a riveting account of the extinction of the North Atlantic cod on the Grand Banks of Canada. Next they engage in a general discussion of the limitations of many models across a broad array of crucial environmental subjects. The book offers fascinating case studies depicting how the seductiveness of quantitative models has led to unmanageable nuclear waste disposal practices, poisoned mining sites, unjustifiable faith in predicted sea level rise rates, bad predictions of future shoreline erosion rates, overoptimistic cost estimates of artificial beaches, and a host of other thorny problems. The authors demonstrate how many modelers have been reckless, employing fudge factors to assure "correct" answers and caring little if their models actually worked. A timely and urgent book written in an engaging style, Useless Arithmetic evaluates the assumptions behind models, the nature of the field data, and the dialogue between modelers and their "customers."

Satellite Altimetry And Earth Sciences

Author: Lee-Lueng Fu
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 9780080516585
Size: 42.72 MB
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The new level of precision and global coverage provided by satellite altimetry is rapidly advancing studies of ocean circulation. It allows for new insights into marine geodesy, ice sheet movements, plate tectonics, and for the first time provides high-resolution bathymetry for previously unmapped regions of our watery planet and crucial information on the large-scale ocean features on intra-season to interannual time scales. Satellite Altimetry and Earth Sciences has integrated the expertise of the leading international researchers to demonstrate the techniques, missions, and accuracy of satellite altimetry, including altimeter measurements, orbit determination, and ocean circulation models. Satellite altimetry is helping to advance studies of ocean circulation, tides, sea level, surface waves and allowing new insights into marine geodesy. Satellite Altimetry and Earth Sciences provides high resolution bathymetry for previously unmapped regions of our watery planet. Satellite Altimetry and Earth Sciences is for a very broad spectrum of academics, graduate students, and researchers in geophysics, oceanography, and the space and earth sciences. International agencies that fund satellite-based research will also appreciate the handy reference on the applications of satellite altimetry.

Understanding Sea Level Rise And Variability

Author: John A. Church
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444340778
Size: 73.76 MB
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Understanding Sea-Level Rise and Variability identifies the major impacts of sea-level rise, presents up-to-date assessments of past sea-level change, thoroughly explores all of the factors contributing to sea-level rise, and explores how sea-level extreme events might change. It identifies what is known in each area and what research and observations are required to reduce the uncertainties in our understanding of sea-level rise so that more reliable future projections can be made. A synthesis of findings provides a concise summary of past, present and future sea-level rise and its impacts on society. Key Features: Book includes contributions from a range of international sea level experts Multidisciplinary Four color throughout Describes the limits of our understanding of this crucial issue as well as pointing to directions for future research The book is for everyone interested in sea-level rise and its impacts, including policy makers, research funders, scientists, students, coastal managers and engineers. Additional resources for this book can be found at: http://www.wiley.com/go/church/sealevel.

Handbook Of Sea Level Research

Author: Ian Shennan
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118452577
Size: 32.88 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Measuring sea-level change – be that rise or fall – is one of the most pressing scientific goals of our time and requires robust scientific approaches and techniques. This Handbook aims to provide a practical guide to readers interested in this challenge, from the initial design of research approaches through to the practical issues of data collection and interpretation from a diverse range of coastal environments. Building on thirty years of international research, the Handbook comprises 38 chapters that are authored by leading experts from around the world. The Handbook will be an important resource to scientists interested and involved in understanding sea-level changes across a broad range of disciplines, policy makers wanting to appreciate our current state of knowledge of sea-level change over different timescales, and many teachers at the university level, as well as advanced-level undergraduates and postgraduate research students, wanting to learn more about sea-level change. Additional resources for this book can be found at: www.wiley.com\go\shennan\sealevel