Download sharing archaeology academe practice and the public routledge studies in archaeology in pdf or read sharing archaeology academe practice and the public routledge studies in archaeology in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get sharing archaeology academe practice and the public routledge studies in archaeology in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Sharing Archaeology

Author: Peter Stone
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317800966
Size: 76.21 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 4709
Download and Read
As a discipline, Archaeology has developed rapidly over the last half-century. The increase in so-called ‘public archaeology,’ with its wide range of television programming, community projects, newspaper articles, and enhanced site-based interpretation has taken archaeology from a closed academic discipline of interest to a tiny minority to a topic of increasing interest to the general public. This book explores how archaeologists share information – with specialists from other disciplines working within archaeology, other archaeologists, and a range of non-specialist groups. It emphasises that to adequately address contemporary levels of interest in their subject, archaeologists must work alongside and trust experts with an array of different skills and specializations. Drawing on case studies from eleven countries, Sharing Archaeology explores a wide range of issues raised as the result of archaeologists’ communication both within and outside the discipline. Examining best practice with wider implications and uses beyond the specified case studies, the chapters in this book raise questions as well as answers, provoking a critical evaluation of how best to interact with varied audiences and enhance sharing of archaeology.

Community Archaeology And Heritage In Africa

Author: Peter R. Schmidt
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317220757
Size: 68.91 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 4689
Download and Read
This volume provides new insights into the distinctive contributions that community archaeology and heritage make to the decolonization of archaeological practice. Using innovative approaches, the contributors explore important initiatives which have protected and revitalized local heritage, initiatives that involved archaeologists as co-producers rather than leaders. These case studies underline the need completely reshape archaeological practice, engaging local and indigenous communities in regular dialogue and recognizing their distinctive needs, in order to break away from the top-down power relationships that have previously characterized archaeology in Africa. Community Archaeology and Heritage in Africa reflects a determined effort to change how archaeology is taught to future generations. Through community-based participatory approaches, archaeologists and heritage professionals can benefit from shared resources and local knowledge; and by sharing decision-making with members of local communities, archaeological inquiry can enhance their way of life, ameliorate their human rights concerns, and meet their daily needs to build better futures. Exchanging traditional power structures for research design and implementation, the examples outlined in this volume demonstrate the discipline’s exciting capacity to move forward to achieve its potential as a broader, more accessible, and more inclusive field.

Community Based Heritage In Africa

Author: Peter R. Schmidt
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1351980920
Size: 72.81 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 5523
Download and Read
This volume provides a powerful alternative to the Western paradigms that have governed archaeological inquiry and heritage studies in Africa. Community-based Heritage Research in Africa boldly shifts focus away from top-down community engagements, usually instigated by elite academic and heritage institutions, to examine locally initiated projects. Schmidt explores how and why local research initiatives, which are often motivated by rapid culture change caused by globalization, arose among the Haya people of western Tanzania. In particular, the trauma of HIV/AIDS resulted in the loss of elders who had performed oral traditions and rituals at sacred places, the two most recognized forms of heritage among the Haya as well as distinct alternatives to the authorized heritage discourse favored around the globe. Examining three local initiatives, Schmidt draws on his experience as an anthropologist invited to collaborate and co-produce with the Haya to provide a poignant rendering of the successes, conflicts, and failures that punctuated their participatory community research efforts. This frank appraisal privileges local voices and focuses attention on the unique and important contributions that such projects can make to the preservation of regional history. Through this blend of personalized narrative and analytical examination, the book provides fresh insights into African archaeology and heritage studies.

The Oxford Handbook Of Public Archaeology

Author: Robin Skeates
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191612502
Size: 57.99 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 7173
Download and Read
The Oxford Handbook of Public Archaeology seeks to reappraise the place of archaeology in the contemporary world by providing a series of essays that critically engage with both old and current debates in the field of public archaeology. Divided into four distinct sections and drawing across disciplines in this dynamic field, the volume aims to evaluate the range of research strategies and methods used in archaeological heritage and museum studies, identify and contribute to key contemporary debates, critically explore the history of archaeological resource management, and question the fundamental principles and practices through which the archaeological past is understood and used today.

A Future For Archaeology

Author: Robert Layton
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9781844721269
Size: 76.31 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 4670
Download and Read
The essays in this book look back at some of the most important events where a role for an archaeology concerned with the past in the present first emerged and look forward to the practical and theoretical issues now central to a socially engaged discipline and shaping its future.

Managing Archaeology

Author: John Carman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134843542
Size: 44.51 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 7164
Download and Read
Effective management is becoming increasingly important in all aspects of archaeology. Archaeologists must manage the artefacts thay deal with, their funding, ancient sites, as well as the practice of archaeology itself. Managing Archaeology is a collecton of outstanding papers from experts involved in these many areas. The contributors focus on the principles and practice of management in the 1990s, covering such crucial aeas as the management of contract and field archaeology, heritage management, marketing, law and information technology. The resulting volume is important and informative reading for archaeologists and heritage managers, as well as planners, policy makers and environmental consultants.

Transforming Archaeology

Author: Sonya Atalay
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315416522
Size: 69.89 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1355
Download and Read
Archaeology for whom? The dozen well-known contributors to this innovative volume suggest nothing less than a transformation of the discipline into a service-oriented, community-based endeavor. They wish to replace the primacy of meeting academic demands with meeting the needs and values of those outside the field who may benefit most from our work. They insist that we employ both rigorous scientific methods and an equally rigorous critique of those practices to ensure that our work addresses real-world social, environmental, and political problems. A transformed archaeology requires both personal engagement and a new toolkit. Thus, in addition to the theoretical grounding and case materials from around the world, each contributor offers a personal statement of their goals and an outline of collaborative methods that can be adopted by other archaeologists.

Public Archaeology

Author: Nick Merriman
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 0415258898
Size: 61.83 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 5015
Download and Read
Scrutinizing, in detail, the relationship between archaeology, heritage and the public, this much-needed volume explores public interest and participation in archaeology as a subject worthy of academic attention in its own right. Examining case studies from throughout the world; from North America, Britain, Egypt and Brazil to East Africa, China and beyond, Nick Merriman focuses on two key areas: communication and interpretation, and stakeholders. Constant reports of new discoveries, protests over the destruction of sites and debates over the return of artefacts such as the Elgin marbles or indigenous remains testify to an increasing public interest in archaeology. For students and scholars of this archaeology, and of its relationship with the public, this will prove essential reading.

Ruin Memories

Author: Bjørnar Olsen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317695801
Size: 29.84 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 770
Download and Read
Since the nineteenth century, mass-production, consumerism and cycles of material replacement have accelerated; increasingly larger amounts of things are increasingly victimized rapidly and made redundant. At the same time, processes of destruction have immensely intensified, although largely overlooked when compared to the research and social significance devoted to consumption and production. The outcome is a ruin landscape of derelict factories, closed shopping malls, overgrown bunkers and redundant mining towns; a ghostly world of decaying modern debris normally omitted from academic concerns and conventional histories. The archaeology of the recent or contemporary past has grown fast during the last decade. This development has been concurrent with a broader popular, artistic and scholarly interest in modern ruins in general. Ruin Memories explores how the ruins of modernity are conceived and assigned cultural value in contemporary academic and public discourses, reassesses the cultural and historical value of modern ruins and suggests possible means for reaffirming their cultural and historic significance. Crucial for this reassessment is a concern with decay and ruination, and with the role things play in expressing the neglected, unsuccessful and ineffable. Abandonment and ruination is usually understood negatively through the tropes of loss and deprivation; things are degraded and humiliated while the information, knowledge and memory embedded in them become lost along the way. Without even ignoring its many negative and traumatizing aspects, a main question addressed in this book is whether ruination also can be seen as an act of disclosure. If ruination disturbs the routinized and ready-to-hand, to what extent can it also be seen as a recovery of memory as exposing meanings and presences that perhaps are only possible to grasp at second hand when no longer immersed in their withdrawn and useful reality? Anybody interested in the archaeology of the contemporary past will find Ruin Memories an essential guide to the very latest theoretical research in this emerging field of archaeological thought.