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Show Trials

Author: George H. Hodos
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275927837
Size: 32.81 MB
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Pp. 83-91 discuss the Slansky trial (1952) and its antisemitic aspects, accompanied by the author's personal notes. Rudolf Slansky (1901-1952), a Jew and secretary-general of the Czechoslovak Communist Party, and fourteen leading party members (eleven of whom were Jews) were prosecuted for conspiring against the state. They were seen as Zionist activists and agents of imperialist Israel. The Jewish descent of the defendants was constantly stressed. Slansky and ten others were hanged in December 1952; the other three were sentenced to life imprisonment. The trial formed a direct link with the Doctors' Plot in the Soviet Union. Hodos himself, a Hungarian Jew, was tried in Hungary in 1954 and sentenced to eight years in prison. Includes information on similar trials in Poland, Romania, East Germany, and Bulgaria.

De Stalinising Eastern Europe

Author: Kevin McDermott
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137368926
Size: 58.96 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This unique volume examines how and to what extent former victims of Stalinist terror from across the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe were received, reintegrated and rehabilitated following the mass releases from prisons and labour camps which came in the wake of Stalin's death in 1953 and Khrushchev's reforms in the subsequent decade.

Cold War Europe

Author: Mark Gilbert
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442219866
Size: 53.65 MB
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This compelling history explores the conflict that defined world politics for decades. Focusing on European actors and events, Gilbert emphasizes the Cold War’s central role in the postwar development of the continent. Fast-paced and readable, this political, intellectual, and social history illuminates a conflict that continues to resonate.

Iron Curtain

Author: Anne Applebaum
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 1846147344
Size: 27.26 MB
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At the end of the Second World War, the Soviet Union unexpectedly found itself in control of a huge swathe of territory in Eastern Europe. Stalin and his secret police set out to convert a dozen radically different countries to a completely new political and moral system: communism. In Iron Curtain, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Anne Applebaum describes how the Communist regimes of Eastern Europe were created and what daily life was like once they were complete. Applebaum describes in devastating detail how political parties, the church, the media, young people's organizations - the institutions of civil society on every level - were quickly eviscerated. She explains how the secret police services were organized, how the media came to be dominated by communists, and how all forms of opposition were undermined and destroyed. Ranging widely across new archival material and many sources unknown in English, she follows the communists' tactics as they bullied, threatened and murdered their way to power. She also chronicles individual lives to show the choices people had to make - to fight, to flee, or to collaborate. Within a remarkably short period after the end of the war, Eastern Europe had been ruthlessly Stalinized. Iron Curtain is a brilliant history of a brutal period and a haunting reminder of how fragile free societies can be. Today the Soviet Bloc is a lost civilization, one whose cruelty, paranoia, bizarre morality, and strange aesthetics Anne Applebaum captures in the pages of this exceptional work of historical and moral reckoning.

Law And War

Author: Peter Maguire
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231518196
Size: 18.23 MB
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In this classic text, Peter Maguire follows America's legal relationship with war, both before and after the Nuremberg trials of the 1940s. Maguire argues that the precedents set by the trials were nothing less than revolutionary, and he traces the development of these new attitudes throughout American history. The text has been revised throughout, with a new preface and postscript discussing the George W. Bush administration's attempt to rewrite the laws of war after 9/11. Maguire connects these efforts to the decline in American power and reputation. Praise for the previous edition: "[An] intriguing historical analysis."—Harvard Law Review "Outstanding... impressive... a terrific book."—American Historical Review "A five-star accomplishment that will intrigue the reader and prove that, in history, truth is often more fascinating than fiction."—H. W. William Caming, former Nuremberg prosecutor "Perceptive."—Journal of American History "An important and fascinating study, marked by impressive research and moral passion."—Ronald Steel, University of Southern California "A 'must read' for all those interested in international criminal law, war crimes, and war crime trials."—J. C. Watkins Jr., University of Alabama "A sobering exploration of the hypocrisy and double standards that shape the laws of war. Maguire reveals the conflict between American ideology and American imperialism, the Faustian compromises made by our leaders during their elusive quest for justice."—Iris Chang, author of The Rape of Nanking "A pioneering account.... Law and War goes back to the middle of the nineteenth century to trace the history of modern war crimes, their shock value, and the efforts made to bring their perpetrators to account."—Thomas Keenan, Bardian

Stalin S American Spy

Author: Tony Sharp
Publisher: Hurst
ISBN: 184904497X
Size: 70.22 MB
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Stalin's American Spy tells the remarkable story of Noel Field, a Soviet agent in the US State Department in the mid-1930s. Lured to Prague in May 1949, he was kidnapped and handed over to the Hungarian secret police. Tortured by them and interrogated too by their Soviet superiors, Field's forced 'confessions' were manipulated by Stalin and his East European satraps to launch a devastating series of show-trials that led to the imprisonment and judicial murder of numerous Czechoslovak, German, Polish and Hungarian party members. Yet there were other events in his very strange career that could give rise to the suspicion that Field was an American spy who had infiltrated the Communist movement at the behest of Allen Dulles, the wartime OSS chief in Switzerland who later headed the CIA. Never tried, Field and his wife were imprisoned in Budapest until 1954, then granted political asylum in Hungary, where they lived out their sterile last years. This new biography takes a fresh look at Field's relationship with Dulles, and his role in the Alger Hiss affair. It sheds fresh light upon Soviet espionage in the United States and Field's relationship with Hede Massing, Ignace Reiss and Walter Krivitsky. It also reassesses how the increasingly anti-Semitic East European show-trials were staged and dissects the 'lessons" which Stalin sought to convey through them.