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Silent Revolution

Author: Duncan Green
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1583670912
Size: 25.95 MB
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"Superb. Combining unassailable analysis with a thorough grasp of economic and political trends, Duncan Green convincingly argues that the region is headed for even greater tragedy unless people move toward more equitable and ecologically sustainable models of economic development." —Walden Bello, founder of Focus on the Global South The first edition of Green's Silent Revolution, published in 1995, described the imposition of neoliberal economic models in Latin America, the role of the IMF and World Bank in enforcing them, and their consequences. In this second, revised edition, Green extends his analysis into the present, showing how the current economic meltdown in Latin America was prepared by an economic strategy that could never live up to its own claims. The new edition was completed in a moment when the Argentinean economy is in ruins, Brazil is on the brink of collapse, riots are taking place in Uruguay, Peru, and in Paraguay, and a U.S. supported coup has just been averted in Venezuela. It will be an essential work for understanding ongoing developments in the region.

Silent Revolution

Author: Duncan Green
Publisher: Thomson Learning
ISBN: 9780304334568
Size: 37.32 MB
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Formerly protectionist economies in Latin America are turning to the market in a search for growth. Duncan Green traces the roots of this transformation in the debt crisis, contrasting the new model's mixed macroeconomic record with its devastating impact.

Faces Of Latin America

Author: Duncan Green
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1583673245
Size: 80.13 MB
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Faces of Latin America has sold more than 50,000 copies since it first appeared in 1991, and is widely considered to be the best available introduction in English to the economies, politics, demography, social structures, environment and cultures of Latin America. Duncan Green and Sue Branford take the reader beyond the conventional media’s fixation on the drug trade, corrupt politicians and military leaders, death squads, and guerrilla movements to celebrate the vibrant history and culture of Latin America’s people. Faces of Latin America examines some of the key forces—from conquest and the growth of the commodity trade, military rule, land distribution, industrialization, and migration to civil wars and revolutions, the debt crisis, neoliberalism, and NAFTA—shaping the region’s political and social history. Green also analyzes the response to these transformations—the rise of freedom fighters and populists, guerrilla wars and grassroots social movements, union organizing and trade movements, liberation theology, and the women’s movement, sustainable development and the fight for the rainforest, popular culture and the mass media—providing a fascinating and unparalleled portrait of the continent. This new edition is thoroughly updated and covers recent developments in Latin America such as the growing costs of export agriculture, the rise of Brazilian manufacturing, connections between the war on drugs and the war on terror, the social costs of neoliberalism, the Argentinian default, the search for new economic models in Venezuela and elsewhere, the decline in direct U.S. military intervention in the region, growing urbanization, urban poverty and casual employment, outmigration and the importance of family remittances from abroad, rampant environmental destruction, the struggles of indigenous movements, and more.

Modern Latin America

Author: Thomas E. Skidmore
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780199929238
Size: 36.11 MB
Format: PDF
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Now thoroughly updated in its eighth edition, Modern Latin America is a lively interpretive history that covers the continent from 1880 to the present, with a preliminary chapter providing context for the region back to 1492. Organized by country/region case studies, rather than chronologically, students are guided through the major countries of Latin America, with central themes including European-New World interaction, racial mixtures, military takeovers, and U.S. intervention in the area.

Export Agriculture And The Crisis In Central America

Author: Robert G. Williams
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469615886
Size: 47.15 MB
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Before social unrest shook the region in the 1970s, Central America experienced more than a decade of rapid export growth by adding cotton and beef to the traditional coffee and bananas. Williams shows how the rapid growth contributed to the present social and political crisis, examines the causes of the export boom and who benefited from it, and shows the impact of the boom on land use, the ecology, and the conditions of life in the rural areas.

Dragon In The Tropics

Author: Javier Corrales
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 9780815705024
Size: 58.56 MB
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Since he was first elected in 1999, Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez Frías has reshaped a frail but nonetheless pluralistic democracy into a semi-authoritarian regime—an outcome achieved with spectacularly high oil income and widespread electoral support. This eye-opening book illuminates one of the most sweeping and unexpected political transformations in contemporary Latin America. Based on more than fifteen years' experience in researching and writing about Venezuela, Javier Corrales and Michael Penfold have crafted a comprehensive account of how the Chávez regime has revamped the nation, with a particular focus on its political transformation. Throughout, they take issue with conventional explanations. First, they argue persuasively that liberal democracy as an institution was not to blame for the rise of chavismo. Second, they assert that the nation's economic ailments were not caused by neoliberalism. Instead they blame other factors, including a dependence on oil, which caused macroeconomic volatility; political party fragmentation, which triggered infighting; government mismanagement of the banking crisis, which led to more centralization of power; and the Asian crisis of 1997, which devastated Venezuela's economy at the same time that Chávez ran for president. It is perhaps on the role of oil that the authors take greatest issue with prevailing opinion. They do not dispute that dependence on oil can generate political and economic distortions—the "resource curse" or "paradox of plenty" arguments—but they counter that oil alone fails to explain Chávez's rise. Instead they single out a weak framework of checks and balances that allowed the executive branch to extract oil rents and distribute them to the populace. The real culprit behind Chávez's success, they write, was the asymmetry of political power.

From Poverty To Power

Author: Duncan Green
Publisher: Oxfam
ISBN: 0855985933
Size: 67.57 MB
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Offers a look at the causes and effects of poverty and inequality, as well as the possible solutions. This title features research, human stories, statistics, and compelling arguments. It discusses about the world we live in and how we can make it a better place.

Shattered Hope

Author: Piero Gleijeses
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691025568
Size: 52.77 MB
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The most thorough account yet available of a revolution that saw the first true agrarian reform in Central America, this book is also a penetrating analysis of the tragic destruction of that revolution. In no other Central American country was U.S. intervention so decisive and so ruinous, charges Piero Gleijeses. Yet he shows that the intervention can be blamed on no single "convenient villain." "Extensively researched and written with conviction and passion, this study analyzes the history and downfall of what seems in retrospect to have been Guatemala's best government, the short-lived regime of Jacobo Arbenz, overthrown in 1954, by a CIA-orchestrated coup."--Foreign Affairs "Piero Gleijeses offers a historical road map that may serve as a guide for future generations. . . . [Readers] will come away with an understanding of the foundation of a great historical tragedy."--Saul Landau, The Progressive "[Gleijeses's] academic rigor does not prevent him from creating an accessible, lucid, almost journalistic account of an episode whose tragic consequences still reverberate."--Paul Kantz, Commonweal

How Change Happens

Author: Duncan Green
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198785399
Size: 67.89 MB
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Human society is full of would-be "change agents," a restless mix of campaigners, lobbyists, and officials, both individuals and organizations, set on transforming the world. They want to improve public services, reform laws and regulations, guarantee human rights, get a fairer deal for those on the sharp end, achieve greater recognition for any number of issues, or simply be treated with respect. Striking then, why so many universities lack programs for social activists, to which students can turn for advice and inspiration. Instead, scholarly discussions of change are fragmented with few conversations crossing disciplinary boundaries, rarely making it onto the radar of those actively seeking change. This book bridges the gap between academia and practice, bringing together the best research from a range of academic disciplines and the evolving practical understanding of activists to explore the topic of social and political change. Drawing on many first-hand examples from the global experience of Oxfam, one of the world's largest social justice NGOs, as well as the author's insights from studying and working on international development, it tests ideas on how change happens and offers the latest thinking on what works to achieve progressive change.

Cuba

Author: Richard Gott
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300111149
Size: 53.14 MB
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A thorough examination of the history of the controversial island country looks at little-known aspects of its past, from its pre-Columbian origins to the fate of its native peoples, complete with up-to-date information on Cuba's place in a post-Soviet world.