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Social Geographies

Author: Ruth Panelli
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780761968948
Size: 35.31 MB
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How do we describe ourselves? Where have we, do we, will we, live our lives? Why are the differences between people a source of tension? How can social change occur? Social geography can assist in addressing these questions. It provides ways of understanding and living in our contemporary world. Providing students with the resources to understand both the theoretical and empirical approaches social geographers take when investigating social difference, this text outlines key theoretical approaches and traces the core geographies of difference: class, gender, race/ethnicity, and sexuality. It concludes by showing how geographers work across these ideas of difference to understand questions of identity, power and action. Using illustrative examples from around the world, Social Geographies includes: - Individual chapters on the main theoretical approaches to difference - Individual chapters on the key concepts of identity, power and action - Reviews of the core literature, with suggestions for further reading - Biographies of key contemporary social geographers - Glossary of key terms For students beginning human geography courses, or in social geography modules, this book is the essential primer.

A Companion To Social Geography

Author: Vincent J. Del Casino, Jr.
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444395203
Size: 54.73 MB
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This volume traces the complexity of social geography in both its historical and present contexts, whilst challenging readers to reflect critically on the tensions that run through social geographic thought. Organized to provide a new set of conceptual lenses through which social geographies can be discussed Presents an original intervention into the debates about social geography Highlights the importance of social geography within the broader field of geography

The Sage Handbook Of Social Geographies

Author: Susan Smith
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1412935598
Size: 21.11 MB
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"With clarity and confidence, this vibrant volume summons up 'the social' in geography in ways that will excite students and scholars alike. Here the social is populated not only by society, but by culture, nature, economy and politics." - Kay Anderson, University of Western Sydney "This is a remarkable collection, full of intellectual gems. It not only summarises the field of social geography, and restates its importance, but also produces a manifesto for how the field should look in the future." - Nigel Thrift, Vice-Chancellor, University of Warwick "The book aims to be accessible to students and specialists alike. Its success lies in emphasizing the crossovers between geography and social studies. The good editorial work is evident and the participating contributors are well-established scholars in their respective fields." - Miron M. Denan, Geography Research Forum "An excellent handbook that will attract a diversity of readers. It will inspire undergraduate/postgraduate students and stimulate lecturers/researchers interested in the complexity and diversity of the social realm.... As the first of its kind in the sub-discipline, it is a book that is enjoyable to read and will definitely add value to a personal or library collection." - Michele Lobo, New Zealand Geographer The social relations of difference - from race and class to gender and inequality - are at the heart of the concept of social geography. This handbook reconsiders and redirects research in the discipline while examining the changing ideas of individuals and their relationship with structures of power. Organised into five sections, the SAGE Handbook of Social Geographies maps out the 'connections' anchored in social geography. Difference and Diversity builds on enduring ideas of the structuring of social relations and examines the ruptures and rifts, and continuities and connections around social divisions. Geographies and Social Economies rethinks the sociality, subjectivity and placement of money, markets, price and value. Geographies of Wellbeing builds from a foundation of work on the spaces of fear, anxiety and disease towards newer concerns with geographies of health, resilience and contentment. Geographies of Social Justice connects ideas through an examination of the possibilities and practicalities of normative theory and frames the central notion of Social geography, that things always could and should be different. Doing Social Geography is not exploring the 'how to' of research, but rather the entanglement of it with practicalities, moralities, and politics. This will be an essential resource for academics, researchers, practitioners and postgraduates across human geography.

Social Geographies

Author: Gill Valentine
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781138130661
Size: 50.26 MB
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Most social geography undergraduate textbooks are structured around different social categories, splintering the discussion of gender, class, race and increasingly now sexuality and disability, into separate chapters. This has the effect, firstly, of making social relations rather than space (the raison d'etre of human geography) the focus of undergraduate books; secondly of ignoring the way that social relations are negotiated and contested in different space. Rather than reproducing this conventional social geography format the aim of this proposed text is to make space the focus of analysis. In doing so the intention is to make complex theoretical debates about space more accessible to students and encourage them to look at their own environments in new ways.

Introducing Social Geographies

Author: Rachel Pain
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1444118722
Size: 37.59 MB
Format: PDF
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`Introducing Social Geographies' is a major new text offering a comprehensive and up-to-date introduction to this important area of human geography. It presents a broad overview of social geography, clearly outlining the key theoretical and political positions, and making extensive use of examples to show how these frameworks can be used to analyse real social issues. The book is ideal for undergraduates first encountering social geography and includes topic overviews, summaries of key points, critiques, boxed case studies and suggestions for further reading.

Justice Nature And The Geography Of Difference

Author: David Harvey
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9781557866813
Size: 52.10 MB
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This book engages with the politics of social and environmental justice, and seeks new ways to think about the future of urbanization in the twenty-first century. It establishes foundational concepts for understanding how space, time, place and nature - the material frames of daily life - are constituted and represented through social practices, not as separate elements but in relation to each other. It describes how geographical differences are produced, and shows how they then become fundamental to the exploration of political, economic and ecological alternatives to contemporary life. The book is divided into four parts. Part I describes the problematic nature of action and analysis at different scales of time and space, and introduces the reader to the modes of dialectical thinking and discourse which are used throughout the remainder of the work. Part II examines how "nature" and "environment" have been understood and valued in relation to processes of social change and seeks, from this basis, to make sense of contemporary environmental issues. Part III, is a wide-ranging discussion of history, geography and culture, explores the meaning of the social "production" of space and time, and clarifies problems related to "otherness" and "difference". The final part of the book deploys the foundational arguments the author has established to consider contemporary problems of social justice that have resulted from recent changes in geographical divisions of labor, in the environment, and in the pace and quality of urbanization. Justice, Nature and the Geography of Difference speaks to a wide readership of students of social, cultural and spatial theory and of the dynamics of contemporary life. It is a convincing demonstration that it is both possible and necessary to value difference and to seek a just social order.

A Social Geography Of England And Wales

Author: Richard Dennis
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 1483150364
Size: 70.44 MB
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A Social Geography of England and Wales considers the theoretical concepts of the social geography of England and Wales. This book is composed of 11 chapters that discuss the theories of industrialization and urbanization. The opening chapters deal with the origins and settlement of English people, as well as the workings of feudal society with its hierarchy of groups of different legal status, ranging from the king through the base of the system. The succeeding chapters examine the vital formative phase in British social history. Other chapters explore the strengths and weaknesses of several ecological and economic models of urban structure that are transported from North America to Great Britain. A chapter looks into the variations in housing type and quality form intriguing reflections of fundamental differences in British Society based on a theory of housing classes. This text also surveys residents of the inner areas of many British cities now experience substantial social problems, which are compounded in areas of multiple deprivation. The final chapters cover the dispersion of urbanism into the countryside where it has provoked fundamental social and spatial changes related to commuting, retirement migration and tourism. This book is of value to historians, sociologists, researchers, and undergraduate students.

Mental Health And Social Space

Author: Hester Parr
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444399691
Size: 48.30 MB
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Through a series of case studies this book brings to the fore the voices, lives, and capacities of people with mental health problems as well as the difficulties they face. It effectively demonstrates the ways people with mental health problems are active in re-scripting versions of social recovery through their use of very different community spaces. Offers a 'hopeful epistemology' not typically found in mental health-related research Interrogates neo-liberal dogma that defines people with mental health problems as active social citizens wholly responsible for their own recoveries and acceptance Brings to the fore the voices of, lives, capacities and difficulties facing people with mental health problems Imaginatively differentiates rural, urban, interest and technological communities, disrupting familiar and conventional accounts of social inclusion and 'the local' Demonstrates how people with mental health problems are active in re-scripting their own social recoveries through their use and understanding of different social spaces

People And Place

Author: Lewis Holloway
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317877640
Size: 50.29 MB
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An innovative introduction to Human Geography, exploring different ways of studying the relationships between people and place, and putting people at the centre of human geography. The book covers behavioural, humanistic and cultural traditions, showing how these can lead to a nuanced understanding of how we relate to our surroundings on a day-to-day basis. The authors also explore how human geography is currently influenced by 'postmodern' ideas stressing difference and diversity. While taking the importance of these different approaches seriously as ways of thinking about the role of place in peoples' everyday lives, the book also tries to encapsulate what has been so vibrant and exciting about human geography over the last couple of decades. By using examples to which students can relate - such as how they imagine and represent their home, the way they avoid certain spaces, how they move through retail spaces, where they choose to go to university, how they use the Internet, how they represent other nations and so on - the authors show how geography shapes everyday life in a manner that is seemingly mundane yet profoundly important.

Relational Poverty Politics

Author: Victoria Lawson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820353132
Size: 26.51 MB
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The contributors explore theory and practice in alliance politics, resistance movements, the militarized repression of justice movements, global counterpublics, and political theater. These movements reflect the diversity of poverty politics and the relations between bureaucracies and antipoverty movements.