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Spatial Planning And Climate Change

Author: Elizabeth Wilson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136934952
Size: 26.93 MB
Format: PDF
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Spatial planning has a vital role to play in the move to a low carbon energy future and in adapting to climate change. To do this, spatial planning must develop and implement new approaches. Elizabeth Wilson and Jake Piper explore a wide range of issues in this comprehensive book on the relationship between our changing climate and spatial planning, and suggest ways of addressing the challenges by taking a longer-sighted approach to our preparation for the future. This text includes: an overview of what we know already about future climate change and its impacts, as we attempt both to adapt to these changes and to reduce the emissions which cause them the role of spatial planning in relation to climate change, offering some theoretical and political explanations for the challenges that planning faces in the coming decades a review of policy and legislation at international, EU and UK levels in regard to climate change, and the support this gives to the planning system case studies detailing what responses the UK and the Netherlands have made so far in light of the evidence ways to help new and existing urban developments to reduce energy use and to adapt to climate change, through strengthening the relationships between urban and rural areas to avoid water shortage, floods or loss of biodiversity. The authors take an evidence-based look at this hugely important topic, providing a well-illustrated text for spatial planning professionals, politicians and the interested public, as well as a useful reference for postgraduate planning, geography, urban studies, urban design and environmental studies students.

Property Rights And Climate Change

Author: Fennie van Straalen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315520079
Size: 42.65 MB
Format: PDF
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Property Rights and Climate Change explores the multifarious relationships between different types of climate-driven environmental changes and property rights. This original contribution to the literature examines such climate changes through the lens of property rights, rather than through the lens of land use planning. The inherent assumption pursued is that the different types of environmental changes, with their particular effects and impact on land use, share common issues regarding the relation between the social construction of land via property rights and the dynamics of a changing environment. Making these common issues explicit and discussing the different approaches to them is the central objective of this book. Through examining a variety of cases from the Arctic to the Australian coast, the contributors take a transdisciplinary look at the winners and losers of climate change, discuss approaches to dealing with changing environmental conditions, and stimulate pathways for further research. This book is essential reading for lawyers, planners, property rights experts and environmentalists.

Study Skills For Town And Country Planning

Author: Adam Sheppard
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1446293122
Size: 62.29 MB
Format: PDF
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"Sheppard and Smith provide a clear, accessible and friendly guide to studying to become a planner, with great tips, insight and advice – including what employers will be looking for and the importance of lifelong learning" - Michael Harris, Deputy Head of Policy and Research, Royal Town Planning Institute "If you are thinking of studying town and country planning at university, this book tells you what to expect and how to succeed" - Cliff Hague, Emeritus Professor of Heriot-Watt University and Past President of the Royal Town Planning Institute Study Skills for Town and Country Planning is a basic introduction to studying planning, a 'how to' for students to develop a relevant skill set to succeed in their degree, and a guide to applying those skills in a very practical and diverse workplace. Clearly written and accessible, the book includes: Up-to-date case studies, providing real examples of applying the relevant tools and techniques covered in the book Practical activities, such as preparing and practising presentations and drafting short reports 'Tips for Success' Suggestions for further reading a Glossary explaining new terms This student-focused guide provides an introduction to the study skills associated with town and country planning for anyone considering or already studying a planning related course. Adam Sheppard is a senior lecturer in the Department of Planning and Architecture at the University of the West of England. Nick Smith is a senior lecturer in the Department of Planning and Architecture at the University of the West of England.

Introduction To Rural Planning

Author: Nick Gallent
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317608631
Size: 25.18 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Introduction to Rural Planning: Economies, Communities and Landscapes provides a critical analysis of the key challenges facing rural places and the ways that public policy and community action shape rural spaces. The second edition provides an examination of the composite nature of ‘rural planning’, which combines land-use and spatial planning elements with community action, countryside management and the projects and programmes of national and supra-national agencies and organisations. It also offers a broad analysis of entrepreneurial social action as a shaper of rural outcomes, with particular coverage of the localism agenda and Neighbourhood Planning in England. With a focus on accessibility and rural transport provision, this book examines the governance arrangements needed to deliver integrated solutions spanning urban and rural places. Through an examination of the ecosystem approach to environmental planning, it links the procurement of ecosystem services to the global challenges of habitat degradation and loss, climate change and resource scarcity and management. A valuable resource for students of planning, rural development and rural geography, Introduction to Rural Planning aims to make sense of current rural challenges and planning approaches, evaluating the currency of the ‘rural’ label in the context of global urbanisation, arguing that rural spaces are relational spaces characterised by critical production and consumption tensions.

Planning Across Borders In A Climate Of Change

Author: Wendy Steele
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780415704397
Size: 13.80 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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The fixity or mobility of borders are key themes within the border studies literature and have useful critical application to urban and environmental planning through theory, pedagogy and practice. This offers potential for transformative change through the processes of re-bordering and re-orienting established boundary demarcations in ways that support and promote sustainability in a climate of change. Planning Across Borders in a Climate of Change draws on a range of diverse case studies from Australasia, North and South America, Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia and offers the application of border theory, concepts and principles to planning as a critical lens. It applies this lens to a range of international case studies in key areas such as climate change adaptation, food security, spatial planning, critical infrastructure and urban ecology. This collection fills an important gap in the border studies literature, bringing climate change considerations to bear on planning. It should be of interest to students, scholars and professionals in the field of urban and environmental planning, climate change adaptation, border studies, urban studies, human and political geography, environmental studies and development.

Climate Change And Urban Settlements

Author: Mahendra Sethi
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1315398494
Size: 16.45 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Climate change and urbanization are two of the greatest challenges facing humanity in the 21st century, and their effects are converging in dangerous ways. Cities contribute significantly to global warming, and as the world further takes a rural-urban population tilt, the next few decades pose a great challenge in addressing global disparities in the access and allocation of carbon. This book explores the ways in which cities, through their spatial development, contribute to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and looks at the ways in which rapidly urbanizing cities in low- and middle-income countries can be planned to reduce overall GHG emissions. The book considers key questions such a: What should be the appropriate economies of scale for cities in a country? What is the most favourable rate of urbanization? What should be the most suitable spatial pattern for a city? And what are appropriate regulatory, economic or governance mechanisms to achieve a low-carbon society? These issues are explored through data analysis of over 156 developing countries and through a specific case study of India. India acts as an interesting example of how societies undergoing rural-to-urban transformations could become green within the planetary boundaries while systematically addressing national and local urban governance. The research concludes with a future pathway that is committed to low-carbon and high-equity spatial development, and will find pertinence to researchers and practitioners alike. This book provides a new tool for policymakers, planners and scholars to rationally and equitably account for global carbon space, prioritize low-carbon strategies for national urbanization and planning individual cities, in addition to recommending an urban governance framework inclusive of green agenda.

Social Sustainability Climate Resilience And Community Based Urban Development

Author: Cathy Baldwin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 135110330X
Size: 77.34 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Urban communities around the world face increased stress from natural disasters linked to climate change, and other urban pressures. They need to grow rapidly stronger in order to cope, adapt and flourish. Strong social networks and social cohesion can be more important for a community’s resilience than the actual physical structures of a city. But how can urban planning and design support these critical collective social strengths? This book offers blue sky thinking from the applied social and behavioural sciences, and urban planning. It looks at case studies from 14 countries around the world – including India, the USA, South Africa, Indonesia, the UK and New Zealand – focusing on initiatives for housing, public space and transport stops, and also natural disasters such as flooding and earthquakes. Building on these insights, the authors propose a 'gold standard': a socially aware planning process and policy recommendation for those drawing up city sustainability and climate change resilience strategies, and urban developers looking to build climate-proof infrastructure and spaces.? This book will be of great interest to students and scholars of urban studies, resilience studies and climate change policy, as well as policymakers and practitioners working in related fields.

Governance For Urban Sustainability And Resilience

Author: Jeroen van der Heijden
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN: 1782548130
Size: 28.91 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Cities, and the built environment more broadly, are key in the global response to climate change. This groundbreaking book seeks to understand what governance tools are best suited for achieving cities that are less harmful to the natural environment,

Building Competences For Spatial Planners

Author: Anastassios Perdicoulis
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113682894X
Size: 11.15 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Spatial planning is a process. The focus of this book is on the sequence of key tasks that constitute the process and on special techniques that are suitable to conduct these tasks. Spatial planners require a number of skills to manage this process in an efficient manner, select the necessary tasks for each specific planning context, as well as the appropriate techniques for each task – always considering the people with whom and for whom they plan. Rather than recommending options, or ‘recipes’, this book stimulates critical thinking and questioning: What do we want to achieve? How can we do that? What options do we have? Which option is the best for our case? This book contains enough planning theory to discuss the function of the planner and the alternative approaches, as well as to provide the background for defining a core set of planning tasks. Building Competences for Spatial Planners is ideal for both planning students and newly qualified planners who are rapidly accumulating knowledge and experience. Perdicoulis uses practice examples, diagrams and thought provoking chapter questions to help planners develop high-level skills such as efficient organization, communication and thinking. His engaging style carries the reader through areas such as team functions, how to define the planning problem, organizing timings and how to use charts and diagrams to help planners and their clients. More details at http: www.tasso.utad.pt

Co Creating Sustainable Urban Futures

Author: Niki Frantzeskaki
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319692739
Size: 73.12 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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This is a unique book that provides rich knowledge on how to understand and actively contribute to urban sustainability transitions. The book combines theoretical frameworks and tools with practical experiences on transition management as a framework that supports urban planning and governance towards sustainability. The book offers the opportunity to become actively engaged in working towards sustainable futures of cities. Readers of this book will be equipped to understand the complexity of urban sustainability transitions and diagnose persistent unsustainability problems in cities. Urban planners and professionals will build competences for designing transition management processes in cities and engaging with multidisciplinary knowledge in solution-seeking processes. The heart of the book marks the variety of very different local case studies across the world – including, amongst others, Rotterdam in the Netherlands, La Botija in Honduras, Sydney in Australia and Cleveland in the US. These rich studies give inspiration and practical insights to young planners on how to create sustainable urban futures in collaboration with other stakeholders. The case studies and critical reflections on applications of transition management in cities offer food for thought and welcome criticism. They also introduce new lenses to understand the bigger picture that co-creation dynamics play in terms of power, (dis-)empowerment, legitimacy and changing actor roles. This will equip the readers with a deep understanding of the dynamics, opportunities and challenges present in urban contexts and urban sustainability transitions.