Download systems thinking for geoengineering policy how to reduce the threat of dangerous climate change by embracing uncertainty and failure the earthscan science in society series in pdf or read systems thinking for geoengineering policy how to reduce the threat of dangerous climate change by embracing uncertainty and failure the earthscan science in society series in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get systems thinking for geoengineering policy how to reduce the threat of dangerous climate change by embracing uncertainty and failure the earthscan science in society series in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



Systems Thinking For Geoengineering Policy

Author: Robert Chris
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317554884
Size: 56.97 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 2926
Download and Read
Even by the scientists most closely associated with it, geoengineering – the deliberate intervention in the climate at global scale to mitigate the effects of climate change – is perceived to be risky. For all its potential benefits, there are robust differences of opinion over the wisdom of such an intervention. Systems Thinking for Geoengineering Policy is the first book to theorise geoengineering in terms of complex adaptive systems theory and to argue for the theoretical imperative of adaptive management as the default methodology for an effective low risk means of confronting the inescapable uncertainty and surprise that characterise potential climate futures. The book illustrates how a shift from the conventional Enlightenment paradigm of linear reductionist thinking, in favour of systems thinking, would promote policies that are robust against the widest range of plausible futures rather than optimal only for the most likely, and also unlock the policy paralysis caused by making long term predictions of policy outcomes a prior condition for policy formulation. It also offers some systems driven reflections on a global governance network for geoengineering. This book is a valuable resource for all those with an interest in climate change policy, geoengineering, and CAS theory, including academics, under- and postgraduate students and policymakers.

Institutional Capacity For Climate Change Response

Author: Theresa Birgitta Brønnum Scavenius
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317309782
Size: 65.99 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5413
Download and Read
In a period of rapid climate change and climate governance failures, it is crucial to understand and address how effectively different political institutions can and should react to climate change. The term 'institutional response capacity' can be defined as a measurement for how effective political institutions may respond to threats and challenges such as climate change. This book sets out to provide a venue for the discussion of how to conduct climate politics by offering new perspectives on how social and political institutions are capable of responding to climate change. In doing so, the book explores how democracy, institutional design and polycentric governance influence social and political entities’ capacity to mitigate, adapt, address and transform climate change. The book offers building blocks for a new agenda of climate studies by focusing on institutional response capacity and by offering a new approach to climate governance at a time when many political initiatives have failed. This interdisciplinary volume is a valuable resource for academics, researchers and policy-makers in the areas of anthropology, political science, geography and environmental studies.

Assessing The Societal Implications Of Emerging Technologies

Author: Evan S. Michelson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317302230
Size: 20.75 MB
Format: PDF
View: 3585
Download and Read
A growing problem of interest in the field of science and technology policy is that the next generation of innovations is arriving at an accelerating rate, and the governance system is struggling to catch up. Current approaches and institutions for effective technology assessment are ill suited and poorly designed to proactively address the multidimensional, interconnected societal impacts of science and technology advancements that are already taking place and expected to continue over the course of the 21st century. This book offers tangible insights into the strategies deployed by well-known, high-profile organizations involved in anticipating the various societal and policy implications of nanotechnology and synthetic biology. It focuses predominantly on an examination of the practices adopted by the often-cited and uniquely positioned Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies in the United States, as well as being informed by comparisons with a range of institutions also interested in embedding forward-looking perspectives in their respective area of innovation. The book lays out one of the first actionable roadmaps that other interested stakeholders can follow when working toward institutionalizing anticipatory governance practices throughout the policymaking process.