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Teaching Without Bells

Author: Joey Feldman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317250745
Size: 26.40 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Small schools have the potential to fundamentally change the conditions of teaching and learning when practitioners deliberately exploit smallness and recognize relationships as a powerful mechanism for improving student achievement. Feldman explains the dynamics of teaching in a small high school--what having fewer students in a school affords teachers, as well as the challenges for teaching that exist alongside the opportunities--based on research, teacher interviews, and the author's own experiences as a practitioner in both small and large schools. This book is for any educator or researcher who wants to better understand the kind of promising practices and professional norms that have been nurtured under conditions of smallness. Being informed about what is possible and often facilitated in small schools will enable educators to better reflect on their own practice, consider certain pedagogical strategies against the organizational characteristics of schools, and make educated career choices. Armed with this information, educators and researchers can become more focused in their advocacy efforts and more empowered to improve our public high schools whether by redesigning them into small schools or by transplanting and translating small school practices and strategies."

Leading From The Inside Out

Author: David Grubb
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317256832
Size: 74.18 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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This book proposes that the collective responsibility of teachers as classroom and school leaders working together to solve their own problems provides the fulcrum of school change. It makes the case that teachers and school leaders do not operate in a vacuum, but rather, they work within the larger context of policy and other social influences. Grubb and Tredway provide the building blocks of history, policy, and social analysis that are necessary if teachers are to be effective in the collective school a place where adults thrive as learners and are able to co-create joyful learning experiences for children and youth. By encouraging teachers to move out of the individual classroom and to think critically and institutionally about the schools they would like to work in, about their own responsibilities for creating such schools, about the range of policies from outside the school and how they can influence those policies rather than being subjected to them this book shows that a teacher s influence is not limited to the classroom and students, but can significantly shape and inform external policies and decisions."

Teaching For Success

Author: Brad Olsen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317250869
Size: 28.84 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book focuses on the process of becoming a teacher and on how to teach well in this contemporary age. Wrapping its discussions around the core concept of teacher identity, the book introduces a model of teacher learning that illuminates how you can systematically examine your own personal and professional teaching influences and work to arrange, adjust, and assemble them in conjunction with educational research into a coherent, unique, successful whole. The book demonstrates the many ways your personal self and professional self become integrated into your teaching work. Features of this book:

Teaching English Learners

Author: Kip Tellez
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317250958
Size: 41.52 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book examines the teaching of English language learners (ELL) by exploring topics not typically covered in theory or methods textbooks. Although methods texts commonly draw readers through well-known strategies such as the audio-lingual method, this book, by contrast, focuses attention on how music can advance and improve language skills. Looking broadly at the sociocultural implications of ELD, Tellez examines the role of the teacher in introducing and inspiring students to learn both a new language and a new society. Furthermore, he offers alterative views of language, and shows how a deeper understanding of it can shape and enrich the lives of both students and teachers. Drawing upon progressive pragmatic philosophy of Dewey, Addams, and Rorty, this book helps teachers to understand the important lineage and profession they have joined (or will join), and the urgent role they play as agents of democratic ideals and actions."

How People Learn

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309131979
Size: 49.66 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.

Inquiry And The National Science Education Standards

Author: Committee on the Development of an Addendum to the National Science Education Standards on Scientific Inquiry
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309064767
Size: 46.52 MB
Format: PDF
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Humans, especially children, are naturally curious. Yet, people often balk at the thought of learning science--the "eyes glazed over" syndrome. Teachers may find teaching science a major challenge in an era when science ranges from the hardly imaginable quark to the distant, blazing quasar. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards is the book that educators have been waiting for--a practical guide to teaching inquiry and teaching through inquiry, as recommended by the National Science Education Standards. This will be an important resource for educators who must help school boards, parents, and teachers understand "why we can't teach the way we used to." "Inquiry" refers to the diverse ways in which scientists study the natural world and in which students grasp science knowledge and the methods by which that knowledge is produced. This book explains and illustrates how inquiry helps students learn science content, master how to do science, and understand the nature of science. This book explores the dimensions of teaching and learning science as inquiry for K-12 students across a range of science topics. Detailed examples help clarify when teachers should use the inquiry-based approach and how much structure, guidance, and coaching they should provide. The book dispels myths that may have discouraged educators from the inquiry-based approach and illuminates the subtle interplay between concepts, processes, and science as it is experienced in the classroom. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards shows how to bring the standards to life, with features such as classroom vignettes exploring different kinds of inquiries for elementary, middle, and high school and Frequently Asked Questions for teachers, responding to common concerns such as obtaining teaching supplies. Turning to assessment, the committee discusses why assessment is important, looks at existing schemes and formats, and addresses how to involve students in assessing their own learning achievements. In addition, this book discusses administrative assistance, communication with parents, appropriate teacher evaluation, and other avenues to promoting and supporting this new teaching paradigm.

A Handbook For Teaching And Learning In Higher Education

Author: Heather Fry
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317650220
Size: 28.40 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This entirely new edition of a very successful book focuses on developing professional academic skills for supporting and supervising student learning and effective teaching. It is built on the premise that the roles of those who teach in higher education are complex and multi-faceted. A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education is sensitive to the competing demands of teaching, research, scholarship, and academic management. The new edition reflects and responds to the rapidly changing context of higher education and to current understanding of how to best support student learning. Drawing together a large number of expert authors, it continues to feature extensive use of case studies that show how successful teachers have implemented these ideas. It includes key topics such as student engagement and motivation, internationalisation, employability, inclusive strategies for teaching, effective use of technology and issues relating to postgraduate students and student retention. Part 1 explores a number of aspects of the context of UK higher education that affect the education of students, looking at the drivers of institutional behaviours and how to achieve success as a university teacher. Part 2 examines learning, teaching and supervising in higher education and includes chapters on working with diversity, encouraging independent learning and learning gain. Part 3 considers approaches to teaching and learning in different disciplines, covering a full range including arts and humanities, social sciences, experimental sciences through to medicine and dentistry. Written to support the excellence in teaching and learning design required to bring about student learning of the highest quality, this will be essential reading for all new lecturers, particularly anyone taking an accredited course in teaching and learning in higher education, as well as those experienced lecturers who wish to improve their teaching practice. Those working in adult learning and educational development will also find the book to be a particularly useful resource. In addition it will appeal to staff who support learning and teaching in various other roles.

The Floating Teacher

Author: Elizabeth Randall
Publisher: Maupin House Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 193433894X
Size: 41.65 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Tackle the common challenges of being a floating teacher from managing equipment and supplies to pre-planning lessons and organizing materials. Read the guide cover to cover, or reference the information you need right now. Randall also offers proven tips for administrators to support and fund teachers. Reproducible checklists, forms, templates, and lesson plans make your job easier, your time more productive, and your outlook positive.

The Teacher S Toolkit

Author: Brad Olsen
Publisher: Paradigm Pub
ISBN: 9781594518676
Size: 13.19 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 5675
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"A teacher's life is one of continuous change and adaptation. In this insightful and accessible blend of narrative and theory. Olsen skillfully explores how teachers develop their identity and how they make critical inquiry a part of their daily life."---Stephen brookfield, author of The Skillful Teacher This book focuses on the continual process of becoming a teacher and on how to teach well in this contemporary age. Wrapping its discussions around the core concept of teacher identity, the book introduces a model of teacher learning that illuminates how teachers can systematically examine their own personal and professional teaching influences and work to arrange, adjust, and assemble them in conjunction with educational research into a coherent, unique, successful whole. "This series renders complex ideas not only intelligible, but also meaningful. The authors brilliantly weave together theory and research, vision, and vivid examples. Teacher-readers will find themselves respected as intellectuals and empowered as leaders."---Christine Sleeter, California State University-Monterey Bay The heart of this excellent book is an affirming view consistent with caring theory. It shows how commitment to sound educational practice for English language development educators is more a personal, rather than professional, desire or orientation. This book centers educational change on effective pedagogy and challenges the reader to undergo a transformation process that is more inside-out than outside-in. Angela Valenzuela, University of Texas, Austin and author of Subtractive Schooling and Leaving Children Behind. In Teaching English Learners Tellez examines the role of the teacher in introducting and inspiring students to learn both a new language and a new society. He offers alterative views of language and shows how a deeper understanding of it can shape and enrich the lives of both students and teachers. Drawing on progressive pragmatic philosophies of Dewey, Addams, and Rorty, this book helps teachers understand the important lineage and profession they have joined (or will join) and the urgent role they play as agents of democratic ideals and actions. "Here is a collection of theoretically cohesive books, all of them integrating research and heartfelt understanding. The books carry the polyphonic voices of the individual volumes and, most importantly, they are in sync in purpose, and in passion, and in thoughtfulness about how to make our world a better place for all children."---Maria E. Torres-Guzman, Teachers College, Columbia University Joey Feldman skillfully blends thoughtful research with the voices of practitioners, including his own as a former teacher and principal, to showcase the possibilities of personalization in our public high schools. We know that teachers do their best work when they collaborate with and learn from each other, and that students benefit from being well-known participants in a supportive community. This helpful and engaging book describes how these desirable teaching and learning conditions are enhanced when high schools---of any size---figure out how to act small. For those committed to improving our nation's high schools, this book is an important resource.---Linda Darling Hammond Charles L. Ducommun Professor of Education Stanford University A good school, whether large or small, must be `small' enough to foster relationships and avoid contrived institutional dynamics. Teaching Without Bells makes a powerful and compelling case for that indispensable ingredient.---Adamurganski, President of the Rochester, NY, Teachers Association. "Books about teaching seldom combine theory, research, practice, and inspiration, but that is precisely what The Teacher's Toolkit series does. Seasoned educators and researchers explore the profession of teaching through social justice and efficacy. University faculty, their students, and new teachers will cherish these books, while veteran teachers will develop new insights from them."---Sonia Nieto, University of Massachusetts, Amherst "this book is a wonderful resource to support the development of professional and collaborative teachers. Grubb and Tredway show how teachers can work together to create new educational environments that are essential to improving public schools for all students."---Ken Zeichner, University of Washington As classroom and school leaders, teachers working collectively can solve their own problems and become the fulcrum of school change. The authors encourage teachers to move out of the individual classroom and to think critically and institutionally about the schools they would like to work in, about their own responsibilities for creating such schools, and about the range of policies from outside the school and how they can influence those policies rather than being subjected to them. This book shows that a teacher's influence is not limited to the classroom and students, but that it can significantly shape and inform external policies and decisions. "The concerns of twenty-first-century teachers are significant, varied, and urgent. Addressing them as part of professional socialization and further professional development has never been more important. The Teacher's Toolkit does just that. Using powerful tools of inquiry, narrative, critical reflection, and analysis, these books help new and experienced teachers to achieve balance and perspective in their professional and personal lives."---Susan Florio-Ruane, Professor of Teacher Education, Michigan State University Teaching Toward Democracy challenges our core beliefs on today's pressing issues both inside our public schools and beyond them, too. The book is a must-read for teachers, parents, policymakers, university faculty, and students. This book examines the contested space of schooling and school reform with a focus on the unique challenges and opportunities that teaching in a democratic society provides. Teaching within and for democracy involves developing particular qualities of mind that teachers explore and work to develop as they become more effective educators. The authors offer specific ideas and interventions that can be implemented inside the classroom as well as with parents and the larger community. "This series renders complex ideas not only intelligible, but also meaningful. The authors brilliantly weave together theory and research, vision, and vivid examples. Teacher-readers will find themselves respected as intellectuals and empowered as leaders."---Christine Sleeter, California State University-Monterey Bay "Making a Difference is an easy-to-read book that gets at much of the complexity of what it means to `stay in' or `leave' teaching. This book makes it clear that this kind of simple distinction will no longer work to answer the most troubling---and the most important---questions related to teacher career trajectories. This book will make a significant contribution to the literature."---Marilyn Cochran Smith, Lynch School of Education, Boston College Our culture and media often simplify the choice many educators face---tostay in or leave classroom teaching. Written for teachers and other educational professionals, this book dispels this simple dichotomy by representing the range of responses and career pathways that enable educators to make a difference. Based on interviews with hundreds of change-minded educators, Making a Difference shares career stories and insights against a backdrop that maps out the complexities, roles, and structures that define professional advancement in education. "Books about teaching seldom combine theory, research, practice, and inspiration, but that is precisely what The Teacher's Toolkit series does. Seasoned educators and researchers explore the profession of teaching through social justice and efficacy. University faculty, their stud