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Teaching Without Bells

Author: Joey Feldman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317250745
Size: 41.33 MB
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Small schools have the potential to fundamentally change the conditions of teaching and learning when practitioners deliberately exploit smallness and recognize relationships as a powerful mechanism for improving student achievement. Feldman explains the dynamics of teaching in a small high school--what having fewer students in a school affords teachers, as well as the challenges for teaching that exist alongside the opportunities--based on research, teacher interviews, and the author's own experiences as a practitioner in both small and large schools. This book is for any educator or researcher who wants to better understand the kind of promising practices and professional norms that have been nurtured under conditions of smallness. Being informed about what is possible and often facilitated in small schools will enable educators to better reflect on their own practice, consider certain pedagogical strategies against the organizational characteristics of schools, and make educated career choices. Armed with this information, educators and researchers can become more focused in their advocacy efforts and more empowered to improve our public high schools whether by redesigning them into small schools or by transplanting and translating small school practices and strategies."

Small Teaching

Author: James M. Lang
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118944496
Size: 17.53 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"Research into how we learn has opened the door for utilizing cognitive theory to facilitate better student learning. But that's easier said than done. Many books about cognitive theory introduce radical but impractical theories, failing to make the connection to the classroom. In Small Teaching, James Lang presents a strategy for improving student learning with a series of modest but powerful changes that make a big difference many of which can be put into practice in a single class period. These strategies are designed to bridge the chasm between primary research and the classroom environment in a way that can be implemented by any faculty in any discipline, and even integrated into pre-existing teaching techniques &. Each chapter introduces a basic concept in cognitive theory, explains when and how it should be employed, and provides firm examples of how the intervention has been or could be used in a variety of disciplines. Small teaching techniques include brief classroom or online learning activities, one-time interventions, and small modifications in course design or communication with students."--Publisher's website

Leading From The Inside Out

Author: David Grubb
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317256832
Size: 77.45 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book proposes that the collective responsibility of teachers as classroom and school leaders working together to solve their own problems provides the fulcrum of school change. It makes the case that teachers and school leaders do not operate in a vacuum, but rather, they work within the larger context of policy and other social influences. Grubb and Tredway provide the building blocks of history, policy, and social analysis that are necessary if teachers are to be effective in the collective school a place where adults thrive as learners and are able to co-create joyful learning experiences for children and youth. By encouraging teachers to move out of the individual classroom and to think critically and institutionally about the schools they would like to work in, about their own responsibilities for creating such schools, about the range of policies from outside the school and how they can influence those policies rather than being subjected to them this book shows that a teacher s influence is not limited to the classroom and students, but can significantly shape and inform external policies and decisions."

Teaching For Success

Author: Brad Olsen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317250869
Size: 80.23 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book focuses on the process of becoming a teacher and on how to teach well in this contemporary age. Wrapping its discussions around the core concept of teacher identity, the book introduces a model of teacher learning that illuminates how you can systematically examine your own personal and professional teaching influences and work to arrange, adjust, and assemble them in conjunction with educational research into a coherent, unique, successful whole. The book demonstrates the many ways your personal self and professional self become integrated into your teaching work. Features of this book:

Teaching English Learners

Author: Kip Tellez
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317250958
Size: 22.13 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book examines the teaching of English language learners (ELL) by exploring topics not typically covered in theory or methods textbooks. Although methods texts commonly draw readers through well-known strategies such as the audio-lingual method, this book, by contrast, focuses attention on how music can advance and improve language skills. Looking broadly at the sociocultural implications of ELD, Tellez examines the role of the teacher in introducing and inspiring students to learn both a new language and a new society. Furthermore, he offers alterative views of language, and shows how a deeper understanding of it can shape and enrich the lives of both students and teachers. Drawing upon progressive pragmatic philosophy of Dewey, Addams, and Rorty, this book helps teachers to understand the important lineage and profession they have joined (or will join), and the urgent role they play as agents of democratic ideals and actions."

How People Learn

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309131979
Size: 62.49 MB
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First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.

A Handbook For Teaching And Learning In Higher Education

Author: Heather Fry
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317650220
Size: 54.32 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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This entirely new edition of a very successful book focuses on developing professional academic skills for supporting and supervising student learning and effective teaching. It is built on the premise that the roles of those who teach in higher education are complex and multi-faceted. A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education is sensitive to the competing demands of teaching, research, scholarship, and academic management. The new edition reflects and responds to the rapidly changing context of higher education and to current understanding of how to best support student learning. Drawing together a large number of expert authors, it continues to feature extensive use of case studies that show how successful teachers have implemented these ideas. It includes key topics such as student engagement and motivation, internationalisation, employability, inclusive strategies for teaching, effective use of technology and issues relating to postgraduate students and student retention. Part 1 explores a number of aspects of the context of UK higher education that affect the education of students, looking at the drivers of institutional behaviours and how to achieve success as a university teacher. Part 2 examines learning, teaching and supervising in higher education and includes chapters on working with diversity, encouraging independent learning and learning gain. Part 3 considers approaches to teaching and learning in different disciplines, covering a full range including arts and humanities, social sciences, experimental sciences through to medicine and dentistry. Written to support the excellence in teaching and learning design required to bring about student learning of the highest quality, this will be essential reading for all new lecturers, particularly anyone taking an accredited course in teaching and learning in higher education, as well as those experienced lecturers who wish to improve their teaching practice. Those working in adult learning and educational development will also find the book to be a particularly useful resource. In addition it will appeal to staff who support learning and teaching in various other roles.

Building A Better Teacher How Teaching Works And How To Teach It To Everyone

Author: Elizabeth Green
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393244156
Size: 15.46 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A New York Times Notable Book "A must-read book for every American teacher and taxpayer." —Amanda Ripley, author of The Smartest Kids in the World Launched with a hugely popular New York Times Magazine cover story, Building a Better Teacher sparked a national conversation about teacher quality and established Elizabeth Green as a leading voice in education. Green's fascinating and accessible narrative dispels the common myth of the "natural-born teacher" and introduces maverick educators exploring the science behind their art. Her dramatic account reveals that great teaching is not magic, but a skill—a skill that can be taught. Now with a new afterword that offers a guide on how to identify—and support—great teachers, this provocative and hopeful book "should be part of every new teacher’s education" (Washington Post).

Teaching To Transgress

Author: Bell Hooks
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135200017
Size: 52.82 MB
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First published in 1994. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.