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Telling Lives

Author: Marianne Horsdal
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415680239
Size: 66.35 MB
Format: PDF
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Both interest in and understanding of narrative analysis had developed rapidly in recent years and is now a mainstream element of research across many disciplines. In the groundbreaking Telling Lives: Exploring dimensions of narratives, the author illustrates as many facets as possible of the stories people tell about their lives. She demonstrates the interconnectedness between engagements in narrative research and shows that the theoretical understanding of the nature of narrative is bound up with the methods for biographical narrative research. Through a combination of three independent, connected narrative dimensions, an embodied, a cognitive and a socio-cultural narrative, the author focuses on life story narratives as symbolic expressions where cultural constructions allow for interpersonal interaction. This book also outlines the influence cultural and social environments have upon our own unique narrative memories coupled with our own physical movements in space. The author concludes that the telling and exchanging of human narratives is the primary way of making sense and creating meaning of our own being. This book brings together neuro-physiology, philosophical perspectives and research data and methodology to formulate a new understanding of narrative analysis. It will also help you to produce and analyze your own narrative interviews and perform biographical research. Innovative and thought-provoking, this book will cut across disciplines and be of interest to all students at advanced undergraduate and post-graduate level and researchers in Education, Social Sciences and Humanities.

The Routledge International Handbook On Narrative And Life History

Author: Ivor Goodson
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317665716
Size: 63.22 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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In recent decades, there has been a substantial turn towards narrative and life history study. The embrace of narrative and life history work has accompanied the move to postmodernism and post-structuralism across a wide range of disciplines: sociological studies, gender studies, cultural studies, social history; literary theory; and, most recently, psychology. Written by leading international scholars from the main contributing perspectives and disciplines, The Routledge International Handbook on Narrative and Life History seeks to capture the range and scope as well as the considerable complexity of the field of narrative study and life history work by situating these fields of study within the historical and contemporary context. Topics covered include: • The historical emergences of life history and narrative study • Techniques for conducting life history and narrative study • Identity and politics • Generational history • Social and psycho-social approaches to narrative history With chapters from expert contributors, this volume will prove a comprehensive and authoritative resource to students, researchers and educators interested in narrative theory, analysis and interpretation.

Constructing Narratives Of Continuity And Change

Author: Hazel Reid
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317909283
Size: 27.43 MB
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In this volume, academics and researchers across disciplines including education, psychology and health studies come together to discuss personal, political and professional narratives of struggle, resilience and hope. Contributors draw from a rich body of auto/biographical research to examine the role of narrative and how it can be constructed to compose a life story, considering the roles of significant others, inspirational, educational and fictional characters, and those in myth and legend. The book discusses how personal narrative, often neglected in social and psychological enquiry, can be a valuable resource across a range of settings. Reference is made to the evolving role of narrative in education and health care, medicine and psychotherapy. This includes how particular narratives are hardwired into culture in ways that stifle personal and social understanding. Rather than providing a ‘how to’ guide, the book illustrates the range and power of narrative, including poetry, to re-awaken senses of self and agency in extremis. Each chapter draws on specific research, describing the context, explaining the methodology, and illuminating important findings. Discussing implications for research and practice, this book will be key reading for postgraduate and doctoral students in auto/biographical and narrative studies, and across a range of disciplines, including education, health and social care, politics, counselling and psychotherapy. It will be of interest to academics teaching research methods, and those developing biographical and auto/biographical narrative research.

Telling Women S Lives

Author: Kathleen Weiler
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780335201747
Size: 44.61 MB
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University of Waikato, New Zealand; Tufts University, USA. This collection brings together the work of scholars exploring the history of women in education in a number of different national settings. The contributors include both established scholars who have completed major studies & younger scholars exploring new directions. All of these scholars share an engagement in reflection on the process of history writing & consider the impact of recent theoretical debates on their own scholarship. Their work reflects the influence of feminist theory & poststructuralism, but also of postcolonial theory & theories of the educational state. In these essays, writers address such key issues as the nature of historical evidence, the continuing need to uncover the 'hidden histories' of women as teachers, the ways life history narratives can illuminate women's own conceptions of themselves as women & teachers, the material conditions of teaching as work for women, & the way conceptions of gender have shaped women's experiences in relation to the educational state, the family, class, sexuality & race. These feminist writers also explore the ways they are implicated in the very subject of their research - the educated woman who is also an educator. Contents: Part one: Introduction - Part two: Reflections on theory & historical truth - Teachers, memory & oral history - Woman/teacher/historian: a central Canadian perspective on writing the history of women teachers - Reflections on writing a history of women teachers - Reading the lives of women teachers: multiple data sources, interdisciplinary analysis - 'Being with Maori women': whose story is it? - Part three: Women teachers' life history narratives, class, race, & sexuality - Pathways & subjectivities of women teachers through life history - Disciplining the teaching body 1968-78 : progressive education & feminism in New Zealand - Where Haley stood: Margaret Haley, teachers' work & the problem of teacher identity - 'We're not what you thought' Southern African American female school teachers 1884-1954 - School desegregation & white women teachers - Sexuality, marriage & women teachers 1900-1939 - Index.

Literacy Research Methodologies Second Edition

Author: Nell K. Duke
Publisher: Guilford Press
ISBN: 1609181654
Size: 75.40 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The definitive reference on literacy research methods, this book serves as a key resource for researchers and as a text in graduate-level courses. Distinguished scholars clearly describe established and emerging methodologies, discuss the types of questions and claims for which each is best suited, identify standards of quality, and present exemplary studies that illustrate the approaches at their best. The book demonstrates how each mode of inquiry can yield unique insights into literacy learning and teaching and how the methods can work together to move the field forward. New to This Edition *Significantly expanded: covers 18 approaches instead of 13.*Incorporates the latest methodological advances and empirical findings.*Chapters on content analysis, research in digital contexts, mixed methods, narrative approaches, and single-subject experimental design.

Haunted Narratives

Author: Gabriele Rippl
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442646012
Size: 70.21 MB
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Exploring life writing from a variety of cultural contexts, Haunted Narratives provides new insights into how individuals and communities across time and space deal with traumatic experiences and haunting memories. From the perspectives of trauma theory, memory studies, gender studies, literary studies, philosophy, and post-colonial studies, the volume stresses the lingering, haunting presence of the past in the present. The contributors focus on the psychological, ethical, and representational difficulties involved in narrative negotiations of traumatic memories. Haunted Narratives focuses on life writing in the broadest sense of the term: biographies and autobiographies that deal with traumatic experiences, autobiographically inspired fictions on loss and trauma, and limit-cases that transcend clear-cut distinctions between the factual and the fictional. In discussing texts as diverse as Toni Morrison's Beloved, Vikram Seth's Two Lives, deportation narratives of Baltic women, Christa Wolf's Kindheitsmuster, Joy Kogawa's Obasan, and Ene Mihkelson's Ahasveeruse uni, the contributors add significantly to current debates on life writing, trauma, and memory; the contested notion of “cultural trauma”; and the transferability of clinical-psychological notions to the study of literature and culture.

Stories We Ve Heard Stories We Ve Told

Author: Jeffrey Kottler
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199328277
Size: 24.56 MB
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This is a book that integrates what is known from a wide variety of disciplines about the nature of storytelling and how it influences and transforms people's lives. Drawing on material from the humanities, sociology, anthropology, neurophysiology, media and communication studies, narrative inquiry, indigenous healing traditions, as well as education, counseling, and therapy, the book explores the ways that therapists operate as professional storytellers. In addition, our job is to hold and honor the stories of our clients, helping them to reshape them in more constructive ways. The book itself is written as a story, utilizing engaging prose, research, photographs, and powerful anecdotes to draw readers into the intriguing dynamics and processes involved in therapeutic storytelling. It sets the stage for what follows by discussing the ways that stories have influenced history, cultural development, and individual worldviews and then delves into the ways that everyday lives are impacted by the stories we hear, read, and view in popular media. The focus then moves to stories within the context of therapy, exploring how client stories are told, heard, and negotiated in sessions. Attention then moves to the ways that therapists can become more skilled and accomplished storytellers, regardless of their theoretical preferences and style.

Composing Diverse Identities

Author: D. Jean Clandinin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134232586
Size: 36.93 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In a climate of increasing emphasis on testing, measurable outcomes, competition and efficiency, the real lives of children and their teachers are often neglected or are too messy and intricate to legislate and quantify. As such, curricula are designed without including the very people that compose the identities of schools. Here Clandinin takes issue with this tendency, bringing together a collection of narratives from seven writers who spent a year in an urban school, exploring the experiences and contributions of children, families, teachers and administrators. These stories show us an alternative way of attending to what counts in schools, shifting away from the school as a business model towards an idea of schools as places to engage citizenship and to attend to the wholeness of people’s lives. Articulating the complex ethical dilemmas and issues that face people and schools every day, this fascinating study puts school life under the microscope raises new questions about who and what education is for.