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The Age Of Stem

Author: Brigid Freeman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317663675
Size: 53.41 MB
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Across the world STEM (learning and work in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) has taken central importance in education and the economy in a way that few other disciplines have. STEM competence has become seen as key to higher productivity, technological adaptation and research-based innovation. No area of educational provision has a greater current importance than the STEM disciplines yet there is a surprising dearth of comprehensive and world-wide information about STEM policy, participation, programs and practice. The Age of STEM is a state of the art survey of the global trends and major country initiatives in STEM. It gives an international overview of issues such as: STEM strategy and coordination curricula, teaching and assessment women in STEM indigenous students research training STEM in the graduate labour markets STEM breadth and STEM depth The individual chapters give comparative international analysis as well as a global overview, particularly focusing on the growing number of policies and practices in mobilising and developing talent in the STEM fields. The book will be of particular interest to anyone involved in educational policy, those in education management and leaders in both schooling and tertiary education. It will have a wider resonance among practitioners in the STEM disciplines, particularly at university level, and for those interested in contemporary public policy.

The Routledge International Handbook Of Innovation Education

Author: Larisa V. Shavinina
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136698086
Size: 29.52 MB
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The Routledge International Handbook of Innovation Education is the international reference work on innovation education and potentially opens an entirely new direction in education. The overall goal of the handbook is to address the question of how to develop innovators in general and how to develop the innovative potential of today’s young people with exceptional talents in science, technology, engineering, and maths (STEM) disciplines in particular. Today many governments around the world are interested in the development of STEM innovators. This handbook provides the first and most comprehensive account available of what should be done in order to develop innovators and how to do it successfully. It includes chapters by leading specialists from around the world responsible for much of the current research in the fields of innovation, gifted education, scientific talent, science education, and high ability studies. Based on the latest research findings and expert opinion, this book goes beyond mere anecdotes to consider what science can tell us about the development of innovators. By enlisting chapters from innovation experts, educators, psychologists, policy makers, and researchers in the field of management The Routledge International Handbook of Innovation Education will allow all of these scholars to speak to each other about how to develop innovators via innovation education, including such issues as: the nature of innovation education, its basis, main components and content, its criteria and specificity in various domains and contexts, societal demands placed upon it. This ground-breaking and potentially field defining work will thus serve as the first authoritative resource on all aspects of theory, research, and practice of innovation education.

Collaboration And The Future Of Education

Author: Gordon Andrews
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317859421
Size: 56.96 MB
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Current educational reforms have given rise to various types of "educational Taylorism," which encourage the creation of efficiency models in pursuit of a unified way to teach. In history education curricula, this has been introduced through scripted textbook-based programs such as Teacher Curriculum Institute’s History Alive! and completely online curricula. They include the jargon of authentic methods, such as primary sources, cooperative learning, differentiated instruction, and access to technology; yet the craft of teaching is removed, and an experience that should be marked by discovery and reflection is replaced with comparatively empty processes. This volume provides systematic models and examples of ways that history teachers can compete with and effectively halt this transformation. The alternatives the authors present are based on collaborative models that address the art of teaching for pre-service and practicing secondary history teachers as well as collegiate history educators. Relying on original research, and a maturing body of secondary literature on historical thinking, this book illuminates how collaboration can create real historical learning.

Theorizing Pedagogical Interaction

Author: Hansun Zhang Waring
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317614895
Size: 63.38 MB
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Pedagogical interaction can be observed through many different landscapes, such as the graduate seminar, the writing skills center, the after-school literacy program, adult ESL classrooms, and post-observation conferences. By viewing these settings through the lens of conversation analysis, this volume lays the groundwork for three principles of pedagogical interaction: competence, complexity, and contingency. The author explores these principles and how they inform what makes a good teacher, how people learn, and why certain pedagogical encounters are more enlightening than others. Drawn from the author’s original research in various pedagogical settings, this volume collects empirical insights from conversation analysis and contributes to theory building. Theorizing Pedagogical Interaction will appeal to students and scholars in applied linguistics, educational linguistics, and communication studies who are interested in the discourse of teaching and learning.

Evidence Based Practice In Education

Author: Tone Kvernbekk
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135039186
Size: 24.89 MB
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Much educational debate today is dominated by a "what works" vocabulary, intimately associated with evidence-based practice (EBP). The vocabulary consists of concepts and ideas such as accountability, competency, effectiveness, employability, learning outcomes, predictability, qualifications, and testing. As schooling and education are considered successful when predetermined outcomes have been achieved, education is often believed to require assessment, measurement and documentation. In this book, Tone Kvernbekk leaves the political, ethical and professional dimensions on the sidelines and focuses instead on further unpacking the core of EBP. Chapters concentrate on several fundamental issues ignored by current literature, including: the character of the evidence that plays a central role in EBP in both practical reasoning and acting under uncertainty the notion of causality presupposed by discussion of the production of desired effects and played out in the basic structure of interventions a system-theoretical look at why interventions might not work. By considering these key points, Kvernbekk articulates both the legitimate uses and the illegitimate, philosophically problematic misuses of EBP in educational thinking and practice. The book will be of key value for academics and postgraduate students in the fields of educational research and practice, philosophy of education and educational theory, especially those concerned with research methodology, professionalism, and discussions regarding evidence-based practice.

Teaching Gifted Learners In Stem Subjects

Author: Keith S. Taber
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317448960
Size: 31.45 MB
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This book offers an overview of programmes designed to support the learning of gifted and talented students in STEM subjects, both to allow them to meet their potential and to encourage them to proceed towards careers in STEM areas. The chapters from a range of national contexts report on perspectives, approaches and projects in gifted education in STEM subjects. These contributions provide a picture of the state of research and practice in this area, both to inform further research and development, and to support classroom teachers in their day-to-day work. Chapters have been written with practitioners in mind, but include relevant scholarly citations to the literature. The book includes some contributions illustrating research and practice in specific STEM areas, and others which bridge across different STEM subjects. The volume also includes an introductory theoretical chapter exploring the implications for gifted learners of how 'STEM' is understood and organized within the school curriculums.

Successful K 12 Stem Education

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309213002
Size: 15.33 MB
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Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are cultural achievements that reflect our humanity, power our economy, and constitute fundamental aspects of our lives as citizens, consumers, parents, and members of the workforce. Providing all students with access to quality education in the STEM disciplines is important to our nation's competitiveness. However, it is challenging to identify the most successful schools and approaches in the STEM disciplines because success is defined in many ways and can occur in many different types of schools and settings. In addition, it is difficult to determine whether the success of a school's students is caused by actions the school takes or simply related to the population of students in the school. Successful K-12 STEM Education defines a framework for understanding "success" in K-12 STEM education. The book focuses its analysis on the science and mathematics parts of STEM and outlines criteria for identifying effective STEM schools and programs. Because a school's success should be defined by and measured relative to its goals, the book identifies three important goals that share certain elements, including learning STEM content and practices, developing positive dispositions toward STEM, and preparing students to be lifelong learners. A successful STEM program would increase the number of students who ultimately pursue advanced degrees and careers in STEM fields, enhance the STEM-capable workforce, and boost STEM literacy for all students. It is also critical to broaden the participation of women and minorities in STEM fields. Successful K-12 STEM Education examines the vast landscape of K-12 STEM education by considering different school models, highlighting research on effective STEM education practices, and identifying some conditions that promote and limit school- and student-level success in STEM. The book also looks at where further work is needed to develop appropriate data sources. The book will serve as a guide to policy makers; decision makers at the school and district levels; local, state, and federal government agencies; curriculum developers; educators; and parent and education advocacy groups.

A Handbook For Teaching And Learning In Higher Education

Author: Heather Fry
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317650220
Size: 17.95 MB
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This entirely new edition of a very successful book focuses on developing professional academic skills for supporting and supervising student learning and effective teaching. It is built on the premise that the roles of those who teach in higher education are complex and multi-faceted. A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education is sensitive to the competing demands of teaching, research, scholarship, and academic management. The new edition reflects and responds to the rapidly changing context of higher education and to current understanding of how to best support student learning. Drawing together a large number of expert authors, it continues to feature extensive use of case studies that show how successful teachers have implemented these ideas. It includes key topics such as student engagement and motivation, internationalisation, employability, inclusive strategies for teaching, effective use of technology and issues relating to postgraduate students and student retention. Part 1 explores a number of aspects of the context of UK higher education that affect the education of students, looking at the drivers of institutional behaviours and how to achieve success as a university teacher. Part 2 examines learning, teaching and supervising in higher education and includes chapters on working with diversity, encouraging independent learning and learning gain. Part 3 considers approaches to teaching and learning in different disciplines, covering a full range including arts and humanities, social sciences, experimental sciences through to medicine and dentistry. Written to support the excellence in teaching and learning design required to bring about student learning of the highest quality, this will be essential reading for all new lecturers, particularly anyone taking an accredited course in teaching and learning in higher education, as well as those experienced lecturers who wish to improve their teaching practice. Those working in adult learning and educational development will also find the book to be a particularly useful resource. In addition it will appeal to staff who support learning and teaching in various other roles.

Handbook Of Design Research Methods In Education

Author: Anthony E. Kelly
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317639642
Size: 46.73 MB
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This Handbook presents the latest thinking and current examples of design research in education. Design-based research involves introducing innovations into real-world practices (as opposed to constrained laboratory contexts) and examining the impact of those designs on the learning process. Designed prototype applications (e.g., instructional methods, software or materials) and the research findings are then cycled back into the next iteration of the design innovation in order to build evidence of the particular theories being researched, and to positively impact practice and the diffusion of the innovation. The Handbook of Design Research Methods in Education-- the defining book for the field -- fills a need in how to conduct design research by those doing so right now. The chapters represent a broad array of interpretations and examples of how today’s design researchers conceptualize this emergent methodology across areas as diverse as educational leadership, diffusion of innovations, complexity theory, and curriculum research. This volume is designed as a guide for doctoral students, early career researchers and cross-over researchers from fields outside of education interested in supporting innovation in educational settings through conducting design research.

A Practice Based Model Of Stem Teaching

Author: Alpaslan Sahin
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9463000194
Size: 26.24 MB
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The STEM Students on the Stage (SOS)TM model was developed by Harmony Public Schools with the goal of teaching rigorous content in an engaging, fun and effective way. In this book, you will learn that the STEM SOS model is not only helping students learn STEM content and develop 21st-century skills, but also helping teachers improve their classroom climate through increased student-teacher communication and a reduction in classroom management issues. There are at least two ways in which this book is innovative. First, you will find student videos and websites associated with QR codes; readers can use their QR readers to watch student videos related to the content in the chapter and see student e-portfolio samples at their Google sites. This provides the opportunity to see that what is discussed in the book actually happened. Second, the book is not about a theory; it is an actual implemented model that has evolved through the years and has been used in more than 25 schools since 2012. Every year, the model continues to be improved to increase its rigor and ease of implementation for both teachers and students. In addition to using the book as a classroom teacher resource and guide, it can also be used as a textbook in advanced graduate level curriculum and instruction, educational leadership, and STEM education programs. Therefore, STEM educators, leaders, pre-service and in-service teachers and graduate students will all benefit from reading this book. Appendices will be one of the favorite aspects of this book for teachers who are constantly looking for ready-to-use student and teacher handouts and activities. Full handouts, including formative and summative assessments materials and grading rubrics, will provide an opportunity for teachers and curriculum directors to understand the ideas and secrets behind the STEM SOS model. Lastly, STEM directors will find this to be one of the best STEM teaching model examples on the market because the model has fully accessible student and teacher handouts, assessment materials, rubrics and hundreds of student products (e-portfolios including video presentations and project brochures) online.