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The American Jury System

Author: Randolph N. Jonakait
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300129403
Size: 14.86 MB
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How are juries selected in the United States? What forces influence juries in making their decisions? Are some cases simply beyond the ability of juries to decide? How useful is the entire jury system? In this important and accessible book, a prominent expert on constitutional law examines these and other issues concerning the American jury system. Randolph N. Jonakait describes the historical and social pressures that have driven the development of the jury system; contrasts the American jury system to the legal process in other countries; reveals subtle changes in the popular view of juries; examines how the news media, movies, and books portray and even affect the system; and discusses the empirical data that show how juries actually operate and what influences their decisions. Jonakait endorses the jury system in both civil and criminal cases, spelling out the important social role juries play in legitimizing and affirming the American justice system.

American Civil Procedure

Author: Geoffrey C. Hazard
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300065046
Size: 48.62 MB
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From divorce proceedings to personal injury disputes to lawsuits over busing, affirmative action, and labor relations, most conflicts in American society may eventually find their way into a courtroom. Such civil conflicts, which do not involve violations of the criminal code, encompass both actions between private parties and public controversies. This book describes and analyzes civil litigation in the United States. Geoffrey C. Hazard, Jr., and Michele Taruffo discuss both specific details and broader themes of American civil litigation, explaining (without legalese) jury trial, the adversary system, the power of courts to make law as well as to 'declare' it, and the role of civil justice in government and in the resolution of controversial social issues. Hazard and Taruffo examine the stages of civil procedure, including the lawyers' role in - preparing and presenting cases; the pretrial, pleading and discovery, trial, and appeal process; and procedural variations. They explore the historical evolution of common law and procedure and compare American civil procedure with that in other modern societies in Europe, Latin America, and Japan. They conclude by discussing the economic, political, and moral constraints on litigation, possible innovations to the process, and the political significance of public access to civil justice.

A Man S Place

Author: John Tosh
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300123623
Size: 34.82 MB
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Based on family records and didactic texts, this book reconstructs how men of the Victorian middle class experienced the demands of an exacting domestic code, and how they negotiated its contradictions.

Burdens Of Proof In Modern Discourse

Author: Richard H. Gaskins
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300063066
Size: 15.38 MB
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This study aims to provide a systematic treatment of arguments-from-ignorance across a wide range of modern discourse - from constitutional law, scientific inquiry and moral philosophy to organizational behaviour, computer operation and personal interaction.

The Origins Of Reasonable Doubt

Author: James Q. Whitman
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300116007
Size: 26.47 MB
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To be convicted of a crime in the United States, a person must be proven guilty “beyond a reasonable doubt.” But what is reasonable doubt? Even sophisticated legal experts find this fundamental doctrine difficult to explain. In this accessible book, James Q. Whitman digs deep into the history of the law and discovers that we have lost sight of the original purpose of “reasonable doubt.” It was not originally a legal rule at all, he shows, but a theological one. The rule as we understand it today is intended to protect the accused. But Whitman traces its history back through centuries of Christian theology and common-law history to reveal that the original concern was to protect the souls of jurors. In Christian tradition, a person who experienced doubt yet convicted an innocent defendant was guilty of a mortal sin. Jurors fearful for their own souls were reassured that they were safe, as long as their doubts were not “reasonable.” Today, the old rule of reasonable doubt survives, but it has been turned to different purposes. The result is confusion for jurors, and a serious moral challenge for our system of justice.

History Of The Common Law

Author: John H. Langbein
Publisher: Aspen Publishers
ISBN:
Size: 37.91 MB
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This introductory text explores the historical origins of the main legal institutions that came to characterize the Anglo-American legal tradition, and to distinguish it from European legal systems. The book contains both text and extracts from historical sources and literature. The book is published in color, and contains over 250 illustrations, many in color, including medieval illuminated manuscripts, paintings, books and manuscripts, caricatures, and photographs. Two great themes dominate the book: (1) the origins, development, and pervasive influence of the jury system and judge/jury relations across eight centuries of Anglo-American civil and criminal justice; and (2) the law/equity division, from the emergence of the Court of Chancery in the fourteenth century down through equity's conquest of common law in the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. The chapters on criminal justice explore the history of pretrial investigation, policing, trial, and sentencing, as well as the movement in modern times to nonjury resolution through plea bargaining. Considerable attention is devoted to distinctively American developments, such as the elective bench, and the influence of race relations on the law of criminal procedure. Other major subjects of this book include the development of the legal profession, from the serjeants, barristers, and attorneys of medieval times down to the transnational megafirms of twenty-first century practice; the literature of the law, especially law reports and treatises, from the Year Books and Bracton down to the American state reports and today's electronic services; and legal education, from the founding of the Inns of Court to the emergence and growth of university law schools in the United States. History of the Common Law offers: dynamic teaching materials that include primary sources, scholarship, summaries, notes, and questions judiciously selected and edited sources over 250 illustrations--many in full color "Living Law "units that connect legal-historical developments to modern law an illustrated timeline that highlights key dates a comprehensive Teacher's Manual, with suggestions for using the book in a two- or three-credit course Vivid writing, engaging source materials, and lavish illustrations breathe life into nearly 1,000 years of Anglo-American legal history. Concise summaries, manageable extracts, clear organization, and a detailed Teacher's Manual consistently support your teaching. *Teacher's Manuals are a professional courtesy offered to professors only. For more information or to request a copy, please contact Aspen Publishers at 800-950-5259 or [email protected]

Origins Of The Bill Of Rights

Author: Leonard Williams Levy
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300089011
Size: 33.19 MB
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In this history of the origins of the Bill of Rights, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Leonard W. Levy offers a panoramic view of the liberties secured by the first ten amendments to the Constitution. Levy illuminates the behind-the-scenes maneuverings, public rhetoric, and political motivations of James Madison and others who overcame fierce opposition to ensure the ratification of these crucial liberties.

The Yale Law Journal

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 54.53 MB
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The Yale Law Journal publishes scholarly articles and essays covering a broad range of legal and law-related topics. The Journal also includes case notes and book reviews.

The Future Of Law And Economics

Author: Guido Calabresi
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300216262
Size: 27.79 MB
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In a concise, compelling argument, one of the founders and most influential advocates of the law and economics movement divides the subject into two separate areas, which he identifies with Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill. The first, Benthamite, strain, “economic analysis of law,” examines the legal system in the light of economic theory and shows how economics might render law more effective. The second strain, law and economics, gives equal status to law, and explores how the more realistic, less theoretical discipline of law can lead to improvements in economic theory. It is the latter approach that Judge Calabresi advocates, in a series of eloquent, thoughtful essays that will appeal to students and scholars alike.