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The Arts In The 1970s

Author: Dr Bart Moore-Gilbert
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113485837X
Size: 21.24 MB
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Were the 1970s really `the devils decade'? Images of strikes, galloping inflation, rising unemployment and bitter social divisions evoke a period of unparalleled economic decline, political confrontation and social fragmentation. But how significant were the pessimism and self-doubt of the 1970s, and what was the legacy of its cultural conflicts? Covering the entire spectrum of the arts - drama, television, film, poetry, the novel, popular music, dance, cinema and the visual arts - The Arts in the 1970s challenges received perceptions of the decade as one of cultural decline. The collection breaks new ground in providing the first detailed analysis of the cultural production of the decade as a whole, providing an invaluable resource for all those involved in cultural, media and communications studies.

British Culture And Society In The 1970s

Author: Laurel Forster
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443818380
Size: 74.23 MB
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This collection of essays highlights the variety of 1970s culture, and shows how it responded to the transformations that were taking place in that most elusive of decades. The 1970s was a period of extraordinary change on the social, sexual and political fronts. Moreover, the culture of the period was revolutionary in a number of ways; it was sometimes florid, innovatory, risk-taking and occasionally awkward and inconsistent. The essays collected here reflect this diversity and analyse many cultural forms of the 1970s. The book includes articles on literature, politics, drama, architecture, film, television, youth cultures, interior design, journalism, and contercultural “happenings”. Its coverage ranges across phenomena as diverse as the Wombles and Woman’s Own. The volume offers an interdisciplinary account of a fascinating period in British cultural history. This book makes an important intervention in the field of 1970s history. It is edited and introduced by Laurel Forster and Sue Harper, both experienced writers, and the book comprises work by both established and emerging scholars. Overall it makes an exciting interpretation of a momentous and colourful period in recent culture.

Don T Look Now

Author: Paul Newland
Publisher: Intellect Books
ISBN: 1841503207
Size: 76.95 MB
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While postwar British cinema and the British new wave have received much scholarly attention, the misunderstood period of the 1970s has been comparatively ignored. Don’t Look Now uncovers forgotten but richly rewarding films, including Nicolas Roeg’s Don’t Look Now and the films of Lindsay Anderson and Barney Platts-Mills. This volume offers insight into the careers of important filmmakers and sheds light on the genres of experimental film, horror, rock and punk films, as well as representations of the black community, shifts in gender politics, and adaptations of television comedies. The contributors ask searching questions about the nature of British film culture and its relationship to popular culture, television, and the cultural underground.

British Films Of The 1970s

Author: Paul Newland
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1526102307
Size: 69.91 MB
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British films of the 1970s offers highly detailed and insightful critical analysis of a range of individual films of the period. This analysis draws upon an innovative range of critical methodologies which place the film texts within a rich variety of historical contexts. The book sets out to examine British films of the 1970s in order to get a clearer understanding of two things - the fragmentary state of the filmmaking culture of the period, and the fragmentary nature of the nation that these films represent. It argues that there is no singular narrative to be drawn about British filmmaking in the 1970s, other than the fact that these films offer evidence of a Britain (and ideas of Britishness) characterised by vicissitudes. While this was a period of struggle and instability, it was also a period of openings, of experiment, and of new ideas. Newland looks at many films, including Carry On Girls, O Lucky Man!, That'll be the Day, The Shout, and The Long Good Friday.

The British Film Industry In The 1970s

Author: S. Barber
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137305924
Size: 63.54 MB
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Is there more to 1970s British cinema than sex, horror and James Bond? This lively account argues that this is definitely the case and explores the cultural landscape of this much maligned decade to uncover hidden gems and to explode many of the well-established myths about 1970s British film and cinema.

British Film Culture In The 1970s

Author: Sue Harper
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748654283
Size: 23.66 MB
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This volume draws a map of British film culture in the 1970s and provides a wide-ranging history of the period.

Analysing The Screenplay

Author: Jill Nelmes
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136912444
Size: 55.67 MB
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Most producers and directors acknowledge the crucial role of the screenplay, yet the film script has received little academic attention until recently, even though the screenplay has been in existence since the end of the 19th century. Analysing the Screenplay highlights the screenplay as an important form in itself, as opposed to merely being the first stage of the production process. It explores a number of possible approaches to studying the screenplay, considering the depth and breadth of the subject area, including: the history and early development of the screenplay in the United States, France and Britain the process of screenplay writing and its peculiar relationship to film production the assumption that the screenplay is standardised in form and certain stories or styles are universal the range of writing outside the mainstream, from independent film to story ideas in Bhutanese film production to animation possible critical approaches to analysing the screenplay. Analysing the Screenplay is a comprehensive anthology, offering a global selection of contributions from internationally renowned, specialist authors. Together they provide readers with an insight into this fascinating yet complex written form. This anthology will be of interest to undergraduate and postgraduate students on a range of Film Studies courses, particularly those on scriptwriting.

The Poetry Of Saying

Author: Robert Sheppard
Publisher: Liverpool University Press
ISBN: 9780853238195
Size: 24.51 MB
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The Poetry of Saying unearths a secret history of fifty years of experimental British verse, revealing and illuminating the daring work of British poets who have spent a half-century rewriting the rules of English poetry. Poet Robert Sheppard considers individual poets such as Roy Fisher and Lee Harwood as well as the role of poetry magazines and the Poetry Society. Sheppard's position at the center of the 1950s British Poetry Revival enables him to offer an insider's commentary on the social, political, and historical background of this particularly fertile and exciting period in British poetry.

B S Johnson

Author: Philip Tew
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 32.79 MB
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"The chapters analyse different themes and phases of Johnson's writing from the early experimental forms, to his autobiographical phase and finally the formally intricate works written in the years before his dramatic and tragic suicide. This literary recovery of Johnson offers new and original interpretations in the first full-length study of the author and his work. Given the growing interest in Johnson, and the reissue of his major works, the present study provides an essential critical context for students, researchers and academics interested in the fields of twentieth-century literature, the novel, cultural studies and literary theory."--BOOK JACKET.

Lyric Interventions

Author: Linda A. Kinnahan
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN:
Size: 38.28 MB
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Lyric Interventions explores linguistically innovative poetry by contemporary women in North America and Britain whose experiments give rise to fresh feminist readings of the lyric subject. The works discussed by Linda Kinnahan explore the lyric subject in relation to the social: an “I” as a product of social discourse and as a conduit for change. Contributing to discussions of language-oriented poetries through its focus on women writers and feminist perspectives, this study of lyric experimentation brings attention to the cultural contexts of nation, gender, and race as they significantly shift the terms by which the “experimental” is produced, defined, and understood. This study focuses upon lyric intervention in distinct but related spheres as they link public and ideological norms of identity. Firstly, lyric innovations with visual and spatial realms of cultural practice and meaning, particularly as they naturalize ideologies of gender and race in North America and the post-colonial legacies of the Caribbean, are investigated in the works of Barbara Guest, Kathleen Fraser, Erica Hunt, and M. Nourbese Philip. Secondly, experimental engagements with nationalist rhetorics of identity, marking the works of Carol Ann Duffy, Denise Riley, Wendy Mulford, and Geraldine Monk, are explored in relation to contemporary evocations of “self” in Britain. And thirdly, in discussions of all of the poets, but particularly accenuated in regard to Guest, Fraser, Riley, Mulford, and Monk, formal experimentation with the lyric “I” is considered through gendered encounters with critical and avant-garde discourses of poetics. Throughout the study, Kinnahan seeks to illuminate and challenge the ways in which visual and verbal constructs function to make “readable” the subjectivities historically supporting white, male-centered power within the worlds of art, poetry, social locations, or national policy. The potential of the feminist, innovative lyric to generate linguistic surprise simultaneously with engaging risky strategies of social intervention lends force and significance to the public engagement of such poetic experimentation. This fresh, energetic study will be of great interest to literary critics and womens studies scholars, as well as poets on both sides of the Atlantic.