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The Boatman

Author: Robert M. Thorson
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674977726
Size: 43.67 MB
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Robert Thorson gives readers a Thoreau for the Anthropocene. The boatman and backyard naturalist was keenly aware of the way humans had altered the waterways and meadows of his beloved Concord River Valley. Yet he sought out for solace and pleasure those river sites most dramatically altered by human invention and intervention—for better and worse.

The Boatman

Author: Robert M. Thorson
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780674545090
Size: 37.90 MB
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The Boatman gives readers a Thoreau for the Anthropocene epoch. As a backyard naturalist and river enthusiast, Thoreau was keenly aware of the way humans had altered the waterways and meadows of his beloved Concord River Valley. And he recognized that he himself--a land surveyor by trade--was as complicit in these transformations as the bankers, lawyers, builders, landowners, and elected officials who were his clients. Robert Thorson tells a compelling story of intellectual growth, as Thoreau moved from anger, to lament, to acceptance of the way humans had changed the river he cherished more than Walden Pond. In his twenties, Thoreau had contemplated industrial sabotage against a downstream factory dam. By the mid-1850s he realized that humans and an "imperfect" nature were inseparable. His beliefs and scientific understanding of the river would be challenged again when he was hired in 1859 as a technical consultant for the River Meadow Association, in America's first statewide case for dam removal--a veritable class-action suit of more than five hundred petitioners that pitted local farmers against industrialists. Thorson offers the most complete account to date of this "flowage controversy," including Thoreau's behind-the-scenes investigations and the political corruption that eventually carried the day. In the years after the publication of Walden (1854), the river boatman's joy in the natural world was undiminished by the prospect of environmental change. Increasingly, he sought out for solace and pleasure those river sites most dramatically altered by human invention and intervention--for better and worse.

The Guide To Walden Pond

Author: Robert M. Thorson
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 1328489175
Size: 25.25 MB
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The first guidebook to the landscape and history of the literary shrine to Thoreau, Walden Pond.

Thoreau S Morning Work

Author: H. Daniel Peck
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300061048
Size: 52.32 MB
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This important book presents a bold plan for converting the failing economies of the Soviet republics to functioning market economies. Its authors-Wil Albeda, Petr O. Aven, Richard N. Cooper, Alfred E. Kahn, William D. Nordhaus, Merton J. Peck, Thomas J. Richardson, and Kimio Uno-discuss the essential logic of the institutions of a market economy and argue persuasively for drastic and simultaneous economic reform within the Soviet system. Written at the request of Soviet economists and with their participation, the book offers advice on price deregulation, stabilizing and opening the Soviet economy, moderating the social costs of unemployment, and creating a commercial banking system.

Thoreaus Sense Of Place

Author: Richard J. Schneider
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1587293110
Size: 65.19 MB
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Recent Thoreau studies have shifted to an emphasis on the green" Thoreau, on Thoreau the environmentalist, rooted firmly in particular places and interacting with particular objects. In the wake of Buell's Environmental Imagination, the nineteen essayists in this challenging volume address the central questions in Thoreau studies today: how “green,” how immersed in a sense of place, was Thoreau really, and how has this sense of place affected the tradition of nature writing in America? The contributors to this stimulating collection address the ways in which Thoreau and his successors attempt to cope with the basic epistemological split between perceiver and place inherent in writing about nature; related discussions involve the kinds of discourse most effective for writing about place. They focus on the impact on Thoreau and his successors of culturally constructed assumptions deriving from science, politics, race, gender, history, and literary conventions. Finally, they explore the implications surrounding a writer's appropriation or even exploitation of places and objects.

Walden S Shore

Author: Robert M. Thorson
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674728408
Size: 28.80 MB
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Walden's Shore explores Thoreau's understanding of the "living rock" on which life's complexity depends--not as metaphor but as physical science. Robert Thorson's subject is Thoreau the rock and mineral collector, interpreter of landscapes, and field scientist whose compass and measuring stick were as important to him as his plant press.

Thoreau And The Language Of Trees

Author: Richard Higgins
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520967313
Size: 64.50 MB
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Trees were central to Henry David Thoreau’s creativity as a writer, his work as a naturalist, his thought, and his inner life. His portraits of them were so perfect, it was as if he could see the sap flowing beneath their bark. When Thoreau wrote that the poet loves the pine tree as his own shadow in the air, he was speaking about himself. In short, he spoke their language. In this original book, Richard Higgins explores Thoreau’s deep connections to trees: his keen perception of them, the joy they gave him, the poetry he saw in them, his philosophical view of them, and how they fed his soul. His lively essays show that trees were a thread connecting all parts of Thoreau’s being—heart, mind, and spirit. Included are one hundred excerpts from Thoreau’s writings about trees, paired with over sixty of the author’s photographs. Thoreau’s words are as vivid now as they were in 1890, when an English naturalist wrote that he was unusually able to “to preserve the flashing forest colors in unfading light.” Thoreau and the Language of Trees shows that Thoreau, with uncanny foresight, believed trees were essential to the preservation of the world.

Beyond Walden

Author: Robert Thorson
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 9780802719836
Size: 51.13 MB
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Acclaimed geologist Robert Thorson has been fascinated by kettle lakes ever since his youth in the upper Midwest. As with historic stone walls, each kettle lake has a story to tell, and each is emblematic of the interplay between geology and history. Beyond Walden covers the natural history of kettle lakes, a band of small lakes that extends from the prairie potholes of Montana to the cranberry bogs of Cape Cod. Kettle lakes were formed by glaciers and are recognizable by their round shape and deep waters. Kettles are the most common and widely distributed "species" of natural lake in the United States. They have no inlet or outlet streams so they are essentially natural wells tapping the groundwater. Isolated from one another, each lake has its own personality, and is vulnerable to pollution and climate warming. The most famous kettle lake is Walden Pond in Concord, Massachusetts; but northern Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota are most closely associated with them. These lakes have had a tremendous impact on the livelihood and lifestyles of peoples of the area--Native Americans, early explorers and settlers, and the locals and tourists who now use the lakes for recreation. Thorson explores lake science: how kettle lakes are different from other lakes, what it takes to keep all lakes healthy, how global warming and other factors affect lakes. Beyond Walden has a strong environmental message, and will do for the kettle lakes of America's Heartland--and beyond--what Stone by Stone did for the historic stone walls of New England.

This Radical Land

Author: Daegan Miller
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022633631X
Size: 17.99 MB
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“The American people sees itself advance across the wilderness, draining swamps, straightening rivers, peopling the solitude, and subduing nature,” wrote Alexis de Tocqueville in 1835. That’s largely how we still think of nineteenth-century America today: a country expanding unstoppably, bending the continent’s natural bounty to the national will, heedless of consequence. A country of slavery and of Indian wars. There’s much truth in that vision. But if you know where to look, you can uncover a different history, one of vibrant resistance, one that’s been mostly forgotten. This Radical Land recovers that story. Daegan Miller is our guide on a beautifully written, revelatory trip across the continent during which we encounter radical thinkers, settlers, and artists who grounded their ideas of freedom, justice, and progress in the very landscapes around them, even as the runaway engine of capitalism sought to steamroll everything in its path. Here we meet Thoreau, the expert surveyor, drawing anticapitalist property maps. We visit a black antislavery community in the Adirondack wilderness of upstate New York. We discover how seemingly commercial photographs of the transcontinental railroad secretly sent subversive messages, and how a band of utopian anarchists among California’s sequoias imagined a greener, freer future. At every turn, everyday radicals looked to landscape for the language of their dissent—drawing crucial early links between the environment and social justice, links we’re still struggling to strengthen today. Working in a tradition that stretches from Thoreau to Rebecca Solnit, Miller offers nothing less than a new way of seeing the American past—and of understanding what it can offer us for the present . . . and the future.