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The Chaco Meridian

Author: Stephen H. Lekson
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442246464
Size: 30.29 MB
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Revisiting his ground-breaking synthesis of Southwestern prehistory, Lekson expands our understanding of the political and economic integration of the American Southwest to encapsulate over 1000 years and 1000 km, from AD 500to the arrival of the conquistadors, and from Chaco Canyon to Aztec Ruins to Paquimé and even Culiacán in Sinaloa, Mexico.

The Chaco Meridian

Author: Stephen H. Lekson
Publisher: Rowman Altamira
ISBN: 0759117373
Size: 19.48 MB
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Lekson's ground-breaking synthesis of 500 years of Southwestern prehistory—with its explanation of phenomena as diverse as the Great North Road, macaw feathers, Pueblo mythology, and the rise of kachina ceremonies—will be of great interest to all those concerned with the prehistory and history of the American Southwest.

A History Of The Ancient Southwest

Author: Stephen H. Lekson
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN:
Size: 38.16 MB
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According to archaeologist Stephen H. Lekson, much of what we think we know about the Southwest has been compressed into conventions and classifications and orthodoxies. This book challenges and reconfigures these accepted notions by telling two parallel stories, one about the development, personalities, and institutions of Southwestern archaeology and the other about interpretations of what actually happened in the ancient past. While many works would have us believe that nothing much ever happened in the ancient Southwest, this book argues that the region experienced rises and falls, kings and commoners, war and peace, triumphs and failures. In this view, Chaco Canyon was a geopolitical reaction to the "Colonial Period" Hohokam expansion and the Hohokam "Classic Period" was the product of refugee Chacoan nobles, chased off the Colorado Plateau by angry farmers. Far to the south, Casas Grandes was a failed attempt to create a Mesoamerican state, and modern Pueblo people--with societies so different from those at Chaco and Casas Grandes--deliberately rejected these monumental, hierarchical episodes of their past. From the publisher: The second printing of A History of the Ancient Southwest has corrected the errors noted below. SAR Press regrets an error on Page 72, paragraph 4 (also Page 275, note 2) regarding "absolute dates." "50,000 dates" was incorrectly published as "half a million dates." Also P. 125, lines 13-14: "Between 21,000 and 27,000 people lived there" should read "Between 2,100 and 2,700 people lived there."

Canyon Spirits

Author: John L. Ninnemann
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826332417
Size: 74.32 MB
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Eighty-five black-and-white photos and accompanying essays share the beauty of the canyons and mesas of the Colorado Plateau and the history of the resourceful inhabitants.

The Science Of Time 2016

Author: Elisa Felicitas Arias
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319599097
Size: 65.26 MB
Format: PDF
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The uses of time in astronomy - from pointing telescopes, coordinating and processing observations, predicting ephemerides, cultures, religious practices, history, businesses, determining Earth orientation, analyzing time-series data and in many other ways - represent a broad sample of how time is used throughout human society and in space. Time and its reciprocal, frequency, is the most accurately measurable quantity and often an important path to the frontiers of science. But the future of timekeeping is changing with the development of optical frequency standards and the resulting challenges of distributing time at ever higher precision, with the possibility of timescales based on pulsars, and with the inclusion of higher-order relativistic effects. The definition of the second will likely be changed before the end of this decade, and its realization will increase in accuracy; the definition of the day is no longer obvious. The variability of the Earth's rotation presents challenges of understanding and prediction. In this symposium speakers took a closer look at time in astronomy, other sciences, cultures, and business as a defining element of modern civilization. The symposium aimed to set the stage for future timekeeping standards, infrastructure, and engineering best practices for astronomers and the broader society. At the same time the program was cognizant of the rich history from Harrison's chronometer to today's atomic clocks and pulsar observations. The theoreticians and engineers of time were brought together with the educators and historians of science, enriching the understanding of time among both experts and the public.

Ten Thousand Years Of Inequality

Author: Timothy A. Kohler
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816538360
Size: 24.37 MB
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Is wealth inequality a universal feature of human societies, or did early peoples live an egalitarian existence? How did inequality develop before the modern era? Did inequalities in wealth increase as people settled into a way of life dominated by farming and herding? Why in general do such disparities increase, and how recent are the high levels of wealth inequality now experienced in many developed nations? How can archaeologists tell? Ten Thousand Years of Inequality addresses these and other questions by presenting the first set of consistent quantitative measurements of ancient wealth inequality. The authors are archaeologists who have adapted the Gini index, a statistical measure of wealth distribution often used by economists to measure contemporary inequality, and applied it to house-size distributions over time and around the world. Clear descriptions of methods and assumptions serve as a model for other archaeologists and historians who want to document past patterns of wealth disparity. The chapters cover a variety of ancient cases, including early hunter-gatherers, farmer villages, and agrarian states and empires. The final chapter synthesizes and compares the results. Among the new and notable outcomes, the authors report a systematic difference between higher levels of inequality in ancient Old World societies and lower levels in their New World counterparts. For the first time, archaeology allows humanity’s deep past to provide an account of the early manifestations of wealth inequality around the world. Contributors Nicholas Ames Alleen Betzenhauser Amy Bogaard Samuel Bowles Meredith S. Chesson Abhijit Dandekar Timothy J. Dennehy Robert D. Drennan Laura J. Ellyson Deniz Enverova Ronald K. Faulseit Gary M. Feinman Mattia Fochesato Thomas A. Foor Vishwas D. Gogte Timothy A. Kohler Ian Kuijt Chapurukha M. Kusimba Mary-Margaret Murphy Linda M. Nicholas Rahul C. Oka Matthew Pailes Christian E. Peterson Anna Marie Prentiss Michael E. Smith Elizabeth C. Stone Amy Styring Jade Whitlam

River Of Lost Souls

Author: Jonathan P. Thompson
Publisher: Torrey House Press
ISBN: 1937226840
Size: 69.57 MB
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Award–winning investigative environmental journalist Jonathan P. Thompson digs into the science, politics, and greed behind the 2015 Gold King Mine disaster, and unearths a litany of impacts wrought by a century and a half of mining, energy development, and fracking in southwestern Colorado. Amid these harsh realities, Thompson explores how a new generation is setting out to make amends. As shocking and heartbreaking as the Gold King spill and its aftermath may be, it's merely the tip of the proverbial iceberg. The disaster itself was the climax of the long and troubled story of the Gold King mine, staked by a Swedish immigrant back in 1887. And it was only the most visible manifestation of a slow–moving, multi–faceted environmental catastrophe that had been unfolding here long before the events of August 5, 2015. Jonathan Thompson is a native Westerner with deep roots in southwestern Colorado. He has been an environmental journalist focusing on the American West since he signed on as reporter and photographer at the Silverton Standard & the Miner newspaper in 1996. He has worked and written for High Country News for over a decade, serving as editor-in-chief from 2007 to 2010. He was a Ted Scripps fellow in environmental journalism at the University of Colorado in Boulder, and in 2016 he was awarded the Society of Environmental Journalists' Outstanding Beat Reporting, Small Market. He currently lives in Bulgaria with his wife Wendy and daughters Lydia and Elena.

Chaco S Northern Prodigies

Author: Paul F Reed
Publisher: University of Utah Press
ISBN: 0874809258
Size: 63.37 MB
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A timely synopsis of the archaeology of the Middle San Juan region bringing recent work at Salmon Ruins into the context of thirty-five years of research there.

People Of Chaco

Author: Kendrick Frazier
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393318258
Size: 48.87 MB
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Praised as a "breathtaking piece of work" that is "written in the best tradition of the science writer and the mystery writer" (Washington Times), People of Chaco is the essential book on the spectacular array of ruins at Chaco Canyon. Like Stonehenge, they are both a monument to our prehistory and a cryptic puzzle. We know that in Chaco Canyon, one thousand years ago, there arose among the Pueblo people a great and culturally sophisticated civilization. Kendrick Frazier addresses questions raised by the famous ruins: What function did Chaco Canyon fulfill? How great was its extent and influence? Why did its culture collapse? Frazier scours the canyon for clues and, in this expanded edition, adds the freshest discoveries on the cosmographic orientation of Chaco's buildings, reports conclusions of the new Chaco Synthesis Project, updates the cannibalism controversy, and summarizes other new archaeological and scientific understanding of this major landmark of the Southwest. 155 illustrations.

Chaco Canyon

Author: Brian M. Fagan
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN:
Size: 30.64 MB
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In this account of the people of Chaco Canyon, a leading expert on prehistoric culture weaves the latest discoveries on Chaco into a narrative of the foraging bands, humble farmers, and elaborate society that flourished between the tenth and twelfth centuries A.D.