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The Color Of Food

Author: Natasha Bowens
Publisher: New Society Publishers
ISBN: 1550925857
Size: 75.41 MB
Format: PDF
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Reclaiming the roots of farmers of color

The Color Of Food

Author: Natasha Bowens
Publisher: New Society Publishers
ISBN: 9780865717893
Size: 75.11 MB
Format: PDF
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Redefining the face of the American farmer Through her compelling stories and powerful images Natasha Bowens' rainbow of farmers ... remind us that the industrialization of our food system and the oppression of our people -- two sides of the same coin -- will, if not confronted, sow the seeds of our own destruction.--- Mark Winne, Author of "Closing the Food Gap: Resetting the Table in the Land of Plenty" ... "The Color of Food" is a stunning collection of portraits and stories that sheds light on the seemingly forgotten agricultural history of people of color. Author, photographer and biracial farmer Natasha Bowens' quest to explore her own roots in the soil leads her to unearth a larger story, weaving together culture, resilience and the critical issues that lie at the intersection of race and farming While honoring a tradition far richer than slavery and migrant labor, "The Color of Food" teaches us that the food and farm movement is about more than buying local and protecting our soil. It is about preserving community, digging deeply into the places we've overlooked, and celebrating those who have come before us. Blending storytelling, photography, oral history, and unique insight, these pages remind us that true food sovereignty means a place at the table for everyone. ... Captures the heart and souls of farmers of color... through the lens of a camera we step into the cultural history of our foods and the beautiful and proud people that grow them. ---Cynthia Hayes, Executive director of Southeastern African American Farmers Organic Network ... Natasha Bowens is an author, farmer, and creator of the multimedia project The Color of Food. Her advocacy focuses on food sovereignty and social issues.

Rebuilding The Foodshed

Author: Philip Ackerman-Leist
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603584242
Size: 75.45 MB
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Droves of people have turned to local food as a way to retreat from our broken industrial food system. From rural outposts to city streets, they are sowing, growing, selling, and eating food produced close to home—and they are crying out for agricultural reform. All this has made "local food" into everything from a movement buzzword to the newest darling of food trendsters. But now it's time to take the conversation to the next level. That's exactly what Philip Ackerman-Leist does in Rebuilding the Foodshed, in which he refocuses the local-food lens on the broad issue of rebuilding regional food systems that can replace the destructive aspects of industrial agriculture, meet food demands affordably and sustainably, and be resilient enough to endure potentially rough times ahead. Changing our foodscapes raises a host of questions. How far away is local? How do you decide the size and geography of a regional foodshed? How do you tackle tough issues that plague food systems large and small—issues like inefficient transportation, high energy demands, and rampant food waste? How do you grow what you need with minimum environmental impact? And how do you create a foodshed that's resilient enough if fuel grows scarce, weather gets more severe, and traditional supply chains are hampered? Showcasing some of the most promising, replicable models for growing, processing, and distributing sustainably grown food, this book points the reader toward the next stages of the food revolution. It also covers the full landscape of the burgeoning local-food movement, from rural to suburban to urban, and from backyard gardens to large-scale food enterprises.

Rural Geography

Author: Michael Woods
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780761947615
Size: 50.32 MB
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"Michael Woods has taken on the formidable task of giving an overview of rural places and society in advanced economies as a single author and has presented a book that rightly deserves to be called state-of-the-art." - Geographische Rundschau "For those students with an interest in rural change, this 'state of the art' book is essential reading." - Brian Ilbery, University of Coventry "With Rural Geography Michael Woods remedies the often underestimated dynamism of rural places and rural society by providing the much-needed synthesis of the European and North American literature on rural restructuring and globalization processes." - Patrick H. Mooney, University of Kentucky Rural Geography is an introduction to contemporary rural societies and economies in the developed world. It examines the social and economic processes at work in the contemporary countryside - including the more traditional: like agriculture; land use; and population; as well as wider themes like: rural health, crime, exclusion, commodification, and alternative lifestyles. With a contextualising section defining the rural, the text is organized systematically in three principal sections: Processes of Rural Restructuring, Responses to Rural Restructuring, and Experiences of Rural Restructuring. Using the most recent empirical material, statistical data, and research, the text is global in perspective using comparative examples throughout. Rural Geography is a systematic introduction to the processes, responses, and experiences of rural restructuring.

Farming While Black

Author: Leah Penniman
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing
ISBN: 1603587616
Size: 78.99 MB
Format: PDF
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In 1920, 14 percent of all land-owning US farmers were black. Today less than 2 percent of farms are controlled by black people--a loss of over 14 million acres and the result of discrimination and dispossession. While farm management is among the whitest of professions, farm labor is predominantly brown and exploited, and people of color disproportionately live in "food apartheid" neighborhoods and suffer from diet-related illness. The system is built on stolen land and stolen labor and needs a redesign. Farming While Black is the first comprehensive "how to" guide for aspiring African-heritage growers to reclaim their dignity as agriculturists and for all farmers to understand the distinct, technical contributions of African-heritage people to sustainable agriculture. At Soul Fire Farm, author Leah Penniman co-created the Black and Latinx Farmers Immersion (BLFI) program as a container for new farmers to share growing skills in a culturally relevant and supportive environment led by people of color. Farming While Black organizes and expands upon the curriculum of the BLFI to provide readers with a concise guide to all aspects of small-scale farming, from business planning to preserving the harvest. Throughout the chapters Penniman uplifts the wisdom of the African diasporic farmers and activists whose work informs the techniques described--from whole farm planning, soil fertility, seed selection, and agroecology, to using whole foods in culturally appropriate recipes, sharing stories of ancestors, and tools for healing from the trauma associated with slavery and economic exploitation on the land. Woven throughout the book is the story of Soul Fire Farm, a national leader in the food justice movement. The technical information is designed for farmers and gardeners with beginning to intermediate experience. For those with more experience, the book provides a fresh lens on practices that may have been taken for granted as ahistorical or strictly European. Black ancestors and contemporaries have always been leaders--and continue to lead--in the sustainable agriculture and food justice movements. It is time for all of us to listen.

The Psychology Of Eating And Drinking

Author: Alexandra W. Logue
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135067627
Size: 64.25 MB
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Choice Recommended Read This insightful, thought-provoking, and engaging book explores the truth behind how and why we eat and drink what we do. Instead of promising easy answers to eliminating picky eating or weight loss, this book approaches controversial eating and drinking issues from a more useful perspective—explaining the facts to promote understanding of our bodies. The only book to provide an educated reader with a broad, scientific understanding of these topics, The Psychology of Eating and Drinking explores basic eating and drinking processes, such as hunger and taste, as well as how these concepts influence complex topics such as eating disorders, alcohol use, and cuisine. This new edition is grounded in the most up-to-date advances in scientific research on eating and drinking behaviors and will be of interest to anyone.

Kabbalah And Ecology

Author: David Mevorach Seidenberg
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316240770
Size: 46.49 MB
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Kabbalah and Ecology is a groundbreaking book that resets the conversation about ecology and the Abrahamic traditions. David Mevorach Seidenberg challenges the anthropocentric reading of the Torah, showing that a radically different orientation to the more-than-human world of nature is not only possible, but that such an orientation also leads to a more accurate interpretation of scripture, rabbinic texts, Maimonides and Kabbalah. Deeply grounded in traditional texts and fluent with the physical sciences, this book proposes not only a new understanding of God's image but also a new direction for restoring religion to its senses and to a more alive relationship with the more-than-human, both with nature and with divinity.

The Farmers Market Cookbook

Author: Julia Shanks
Publisher: New Society Publishers
ISBN: 1550926152
Size: 43.15 MB
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Farmers' Markets and CSAs are among the best places to find high-quality, diverse, and exciting vegetables and fruits. But the rich array of unusual varieties can be confusing and overwhelming. From detailed produce descriptions to storage tips, preparation techniques, and over two hundred flavorful recipes, The Farmers' Market Cookbook has the answer to every prospective locavore's perennial question, "What do I do with this?" Featuring a range of traditional favorites alongside innovative creations showcasing the stunning flavors of heirloom fruits and vegetables, this guide to seasonal eating will help you engage your powers of creativity, learning, and experimentation. Recipes include: Garlic scape vichyssoise Potato fennel "risotto" Beef roulade with cilantro mojo Cantaloupe salsa Eating locally cultivates appreciation for those who grow our food. Full of practical insights from field to fork, The Farmers' Market Cookbook celebrates the small farmer's labor of love with recipes that showcase every crop at its best—essential reading for anyone who wants to appreciate fresh food at its best. Julia Shanks has honed her culinary talents working in restaurants around the country, developing a taste for fresh, local and seasonal foods. She consults with restaurants, farms and food producers, helping them maximize profits and streamline revenues through sustainable business practices. Brett Grohsgal worked as everything from line cook to executive chef while developing and sharing his appreciation for artisanal, seasonal foods. Now he runs Even' Star Organic Farm, growing and harvesting crops year-round for restaurants, grocery stores, universities, farmers markets, and the farm's own successful CSA.

We Want Land To Live

Author: Amy Trauger
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820350265
Size: 67.42 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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We Want Land to Live explores the current boundaries of radical approaches to food sovereignty. First coined by La Via Campesina (a global movement whose name means “the peasant’s way”), food sovereignty is a concept that expresses the universal right to food. Amy Trauger uses research combining ethnography, participant observation, field notes, and interviews to help us understand the material and definitional struggles surrounding the decommodification of food and the transfor­mation of the global food system’s political-economic foundations. Trauger’s work is the first of its kind to analytically and coherently link a dialogue on food sovereignty with case studies illustrating the spatial and territorial strate­gies by which the movement fosters its life in the margins of the corporate food regime. She discusses community gardeners in Portugal; small-scale, independent farmers in Maine; Native American wild rice gatherers in Minnesota; seed library supporters in Pennsylvania; and permaculturists in Georgia. The problem in the food system, as the activists profiled here see it, is not markets or the role of governance but that the right to food is conditioned by what the state and corporations deem to be safe, legal, and profitable—and not by what eaters think is right in terms of their health, the environment, or their communities. Useful for classes on food studies and active food movements alike, We Want Land to Live makes food sovereignty issues real as it illustrates a range of methodological alternatives that are consistent with its discourse: direct action (rather than charity, market creation, or policy changes), civil disobedience (rather than compliance with discriminatory laws), and mutual aid (rather than reliance on top-down aid).