Download the color of the law race violence and justice in the post world war ii south the john hope franklin series in african american history and culture in pdf or read the color of the law race violence and justice in the post world war ii south the john hope franklin series in african american history and culture in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get the color of the law race violence and justice in the post world war ii south the john hope franklin series in african american history and culture in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



The Color Of The Law

Author: Gail Williams O'Brien
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807882305
Size: 77.68 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 818
Download and Read
On February 25, 1946, African Americans in Columbia, Tennessee, averted the lynching of James Stephenson, a nineteen-year-old, black Navy veteran accused of attacking a white radio repairman at a local department store. That night, after Stephenson was safely out of town, four of Columbia's police officers were shot and wounded when they tried to enter the town's black business district. The next morning, the Tennessee Highway Patrol invaded the district, wrecking establishments and beating men as they arrested them. By day's end, more than one hundred African Americans had been jailed. Two days later, highway patrolmen killed two of the arrestees while they were awaiting release from jail. Drawing on oral interviews and a rich array of written sources, Gail Williams O'Brien tells the dramatic story of the Columbia "race riot," the national attention it drew, and its surprising legal aftermath. In the process, she illuminates the effects of World War II on race relations and the criminal justice system in the United States. O'Brien argues that the Columbia events are emblematic of a nationwide shift during the 1940s from mob violence against African Americans to increased confrontations between blacks and the police and courts. As such, they reveal the history behind such contemporary conflicts as the Rodney King and O. J. Simpson cases.

Self Taught

Author: Heather Andrea Williams
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807888971
Size: 54.44 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6819
Download and Read
In this previously untold story of African American self-education, Heather Andrea Williams moves across time to examine African Americans' relationship to literacy during slavery, during the Civil War, and in the first decades of freedom. Self-Taught traces the historical antecedents to freedpeople's intense desire to become literate and demonstrates how the visions of enslaved African Americans emerged into plans and action once slavery ended. Enslaved people, Williams contends, placed great value in the practical power of literacy, whether it was to enable them to read the Bible for themselves or to keep informed of the abolition movement and later the progress of the Civil War. Some slaves devised creative and subversive means to acquire literacy, and when slavery ended, they became the first teachers of other freedpeople. Soon overwhelmed by the demands for education, they called on northern missionaries to come to their aid. Williams argues that by teaching, building schools, supporting teachers, resisting violence, and claiming education as a civil right, African Americans transformed the face of education in the South to the great benefit of both black and white southerners.

America History And Life

Author: Eric H. Boehm
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 11.34 MB
Format: PDF
View: 5355
Download and Read
Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

Newsletter

Author: American Society for Legal History
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 31.63 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 1820
Download and Read