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The Columbia History Of Jews And Judaism In America

Author: Marc Lee Raphael
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231132239
Size: 41.95 MB
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This collection focuses on a variety of important themes in the American Jewish and Judaic experience. It opens with essays on early Jewish settlers (1654-1820), the expansion of Jewish life in America (1820-1901), the great wave of eastern European Jewish immigrants (1880-1924), the character of American Judaism between the two world wars, American Jewish life from the end of World War II to the Six-Day War, and the growth of Jews' influence and affluence. The second half of the volume includes essays on Orthodox Jews, the history of Jewish education in America, the rise of Jewish social clubs at the turn of the century, the history of southern and western Jewry, Jewish responses to Nazism and the Holocaust, feminism's confrontation with Judaism, and the eternal question of what defines American Jewish culture. Original and elegantly crafted, The Columbia History of Jews and Judaism in America not only introduces the student to a thrilling history, but also provides the scholar with new perspectives and insights.

The Columbia History Of Jews And Judaism In America

Author: Marc Lee Raphael
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231132220
Size: 72.94 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 1141
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This collection focuses on a variety of important themes in the American Jewish and Judaic experience. It opens with essays on early Jewish settlers (1654-1820), the expansion of Jewish life in America (1820-1901), the great wave of eastern European Jewish immigrants (1880-1924), the character of American Judaism between the two world wars, American Jewish life from the end of World War II to the Six-Day War, and the growth of Jews' influence and affluence. The second half of the volume includes essays on Orthodox Jews, the history of Jewish education in America, the rise of Jewish social clubs at the turn of the century, the history of southern and western Jewry, Jewish responses to Nazism and the Holocaust, feminism's confrontation with Judaism, and the eternal question of what defines American Jewish culture. Original and elegantly crafted, "The Columbia History of Jews and Judaism in America" not only introduces the student to a thrilling history, but also provides the scholar with new perspectives and insights.

Judaism In America

Author: Marc Lee Raphael
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231120613
Size: 38.98 MB
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This book is about the beliefs, doctrines, history, institutions, and leaders of the Jewish religious community. It is based on historical evidence as well as interviews and direct observation of about 100 synagogues in the country and presents a full portrait of a religious tradition that comprises only two percent of America's population but has a large influence on American culture.

Interpreting American Jewish History At Museums And Historic Sites

Author: Avi Y. Decter
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442264365
Size: 17.97 MB
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Interpreting American Jewish History at Museums and Historic Sites begins with a broad overview of American Jewish history in the context of a religious culture than extends back more than 3,000 years and which manifests itself in a variety of distinctive American forms. Five chapters examine key themes in American Jewish history: movement, home life, community, prejudice, and culture. Each thematic chapter is followed by a series of case studies that describe and analyze a variety of projects by historical organizations to interpret American Jewish life and culture for general public audiences. The last two chapters of the book are a history of Jewish collections and Jewish museums in North America and a look at “next practice,” intended to promote continuous innovation, new thinking, and programming that is responsive to ever-changing circumstances.

The Synagogue In America

Author: Marc Lee Raphael
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814775829
Size: 71.80 MB
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Chronicles the history of the Jewish synagogue in America over the course of three centuries, discussing its changing role in the American Jewish community.

Women And Judaism

Author: Frederick E. Greenspahn
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814732186
Size: 42.19 MB
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Although women constitute half of the Jewish population and have always played essential roles in ensuring Jewish continuity and the preservation of Jewish beliefs and values, only recently have their contributions and achievements received sustained scholarly attention. Scholars have begun to investigate Jewish women’s domestic, economic, intellectual, spiritual, and creative roles in Jewish life from biblical times to the present. Yet little of this important work has filtered down beyond specialists in their respective academic fields. Women and Judaism brings the broad new insights they have uncovered to the world. Women and Judaism communicates this research to a wider public of students and educated readers outside of the academy by presenting accessible and engaging chapters written by key senior scholars that introduce the reader to different aspects of women and Judaism. The contributors discuss feminist approaches to Jewish law and Torah study, the spirituality of Eastern European Jewish women, Jewish women in American literature, and many other issues. Contributors: Nehama Aschkenasy, Judith R. Baskin, Sylvia Barack Fishman, Harriet Pass Freidenreich, Esther Fuchs, Judith Hauptman, Sara R. Horowitz, Renée Levine, Pamela S. Nadell, and Dvora Weisberg.

Ballots Babies And Banners Of Peace

Author: Melissa R. Klapper
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814748953
Size: 43.49 MB
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Winner of the 2013 National Jewish Book Award, Women's Studies Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace explores the social and political activism of American Jewish women from approximately 1890 to the beginnings of World War II. Written in an engaging style, the book demonstrates that no history of the birth control, suffrage, or peace movements in the United States is complete without analyzing the impact of Jewish women's presence. The volume is based on years of extensive primary source research in more than a dozen archives and among hundreds of primary sources, many of which have previously never been seen. Voluminous personal papers and institutional records paint a vivid picture of a world in which both middle-class and working-class American Jewish women were consistently and publicly engaged in all the major issues of their day and worked closely with their non-Jewish counterparts on behalf of activist causes. This extraordinarily well researched volume makes a unique contribution to the study of modern women's history, modern Jewish history, and the history of American social movements. Instructor's Guide

Chosen Capital

Author: Rebecca Kobrin
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813553296
Size: 36.41 MB
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At which moments and in which ways did Jews play a central role in the development of American capitalism? Many popular writers address the intersection of Jews and capitalism, but few scholars, perhaps fearing this question’s anti-Semitic overtones, have pondered it openly. Chosen Capital represents the first historical collection devoted to this question in its analysis of the ways in which Jews in North America shaped and were shaped by America’s particular system of capitalism. Jews fundamentally molded aspects of the economy during the century when American capital was being redefined by industrialization, war, migration, and the emergence of the United States as a superpower. Surveying such diverse topics as Jews’ participation in the real estate industry, the liquor industry, and the scrap metal industry, as well as Jewish political groups and unions bent on reforming American capital, such as the American Labor Party and the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union, contributors to this volume provide a new prism through which to view the Jewish encounter with America. The volume also lays bare how American capitalism reshaped Judaism itself by encouraging the mass manufacturing and distribution of foods like matzah and the transformation of synagogue cantors into recording stars. These essays force us to rethink not only the role Jews played in American economic development but also how capitalism has shaped Jewish life and Judaism over the course of the twentieth century. Contributors: Marni Davis, Georgia State University Phyllis Dillon, independent documentary producer, textile conservator, museum curator Andrew Dolkart, Columbia University Andrew Godley, Henley Business School, University of Reading Jonathan Karp, executive director, American Jewish Historical Society Daniel Katz, Empire State College, State University of New York Ira Katznelson, Columbia University David S. Koffman, New York University Eli Lederhendler, Hebrew University, Jerusalem Jonathan Z. S. Pollack, University of Wisconsin—Madison Jonathan D. Sarma, Brandeis University Jeffrey Shandler, Rutgers University Daniel Soyer, Fordham University

Geschichte Der Juden Im Stlichen Europa 1772 1881

Author: Israel Bartal
Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
ISBN: 3647363820
Size: 17.26 MB
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In der Zeit zwischen 1772 bis 1881 lebte die Mehrheit der Juden, verteilt auf hunderte von kleinen Städten und Dörfern, in dem Gebiet zwischen der Ostsee und dem Schwarzen Meer. Mit dem Aufkommen des Spätabsolutismus begann eine Epoche tiefgehender Transformation. Sie führte zur Auflösung der traditionellen jüdischen Autonomie und einer forcierten Integration in die nichtjüdische Umwelt, verbunden mit einer Erweckung eines nationalen jüdischen Selbstverständnisses. Diese Phase endet mit den Ausbrüchen russischer Pogrome und einer antisemitisch geprägten Gesetzgebung im Zarenreich.Israel Bartal untersucht diese Transformation einer traditionalen Gemeinschaft nach und entdeckt in ihr die Ursprünge der jüdischen Moderne.

The Wiley Blackwell History Of Jews And Judaism

Author: Alan T. Levenson
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118232933
Size: 63.61 MB
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In The Wiley-Blackwell History of Jews and Judaism, a teamof internationally-renowned scholars offer a comprehensive andauthoritative overview of Jewish life and culture, from thebiblical period to contemporary times. Provides a comprehensive and authoritative overview of the mainperiods and themes of Jewish history, from Biblical Israel, throughmedieval and early modern periods, to Judaism since the Holocaust,the Arab-Israeli conflict, and Judaism today Brings together an international team of established andemerging scholars across a range of disciplines Discusses how to present Judaism - to both non-Jews and Jews -as a religious system on its own terms and with its own uniquevocabulary Explores the latest scholarship on a range of issues, includingfolk practices, politics, economic structure, the relationship ofJudaism to Christianity, and the nature of Zionism diaspora and itsimplications for contemporary Israel Considers Jewish historiography and the lives of ordinarypeople, the achievements of Jewish women, and the sustainedinteraction of Jews within the environments they inhabited Edited by a leading scholar in Jewish studies and history