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The Coquette

Author: Hannah Webster Foster
Publisher: Courier Dover Publications
ISBN: 0486806359
Size: 60.46 MB
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Based on the true and tragic story of Eliza Whitman, subject of America's first tabloid scandal, this 1797 sentimental novel recounts a young woman's choice between duty, romance, and freedom.

The Coquette

Author: Hannah W. Foster
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199770274
Size: 68.41 MB
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The Coquette tells the much-publicized story of the seduction and death of Elizabeth Whitman, a poet from Hartford, Connecticut. Written as a series of letters--between the heroine and her friends and lovers--it describes her long, tortuous courtship by two men, neither of whom perfectly suits her. Eliza Wharton (as Whitman is called in the novel) wavers between Major Sanford, a charming but insincere man, and the Reverend Boyer, a bore who wants to marry her. When, in her mid-30s, Wharton finds herself suddenly abandoned when both men marry other women, she willfully enters into an adulterous relationship with Sanford and becomes pregnant. Alone and dejected, she dies in childbirth at a roadside inn. Eliza Wharton, whose real-life counterpart was distantly related to Hannah Foster's husband, was one of the first women in American fiction to emerge as a real person facing a dilemma in her life. In her Introduction, Davidson discusses the parallels between Elizabeth Whitman and the fictional Eliza Wharton. She shows the limitations placed on women in the 18th century and the attempts of one woman to rebel against those limitations.

A To Z Of American Women Writers

Author: Carol Kort
Publisher: Infobase Publishing
ISBN: 1438107935
Size: 19.79 MB
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Presents a biographical dictionary profiling important women authors, including birth and death dates, accomplishments and bibliography of each author's work.

The Coquette And The Boarding School

Author: Hannah Webster Foster
Publisher: Broadview Press
ISBN: 9781770481077
Size: 21.70 MB
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Hannah Webster Foster based The Coquette on the true story of Elizabeth Whitman, an unmarried woman who died in childbirth in New England. Fictionalizing Whitman’s experiences in her heroine, Eliza Wharton, Foster created a compelling narrative of seduction that was hugely successful with readers. The Boarding School, a less widely known work by Foster, is an experimental text, part epistolary novel and part conduct book. Together, the novels explore the realities of women’s lives in early America. The critical introduction and appendices to this edition, which explore female friendship and the education of women in the novels, frame Foster as more than a purveyor of the sentimental novel, and re-evaluate her placement in American literary history.

The Power Of Sympathy And The Coquette

Author: William Wells Brown
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781440674204
Size: 10.90 MB
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Written in epistolary form and drawn from actual events, Brown’s The Power of Sympathy (1789) and Foster’s The Coquette (1797) were two of the earliest novels published in the United States. Both novels reflect the eighteenth-century preoccupation with the role of women as safekeepers of the young country’s morality.

Revolution And The Word The Rise Of The Novel In America

Author: Cathy N. Davidson Professor of English Duke University
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199728852
Size: 49.87 MB
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Revolution and the Word offers a unique perspective on the origins of American fiction, looking not only at the early novels themselves but at the people who produced them, sold them, and read them. It shows how, in the aftermath of the American Revolution, the novel found a special place among the least privileged citizens of the new republic. As Cathy N. Davidson explains, early American novels--most of them now long forgotten--were a primary means by which those who bought and read them, especially women and the lower classes, moved into the higher levels of literacy required by a democracy. This very fact, Davidson shows, also made these people less amenable to the control of the gentry who, naturally enough, derided fiction as a potentially subversive genre. Combining rigorous historical methods with the newest insights of literacy theory, Davidson brilliantly reconstructs the complex interplay of politics, ideology, economics, and other social forces that governed the way novels were written, published, distributed, and understood. Davidson also shows, in almost tactile detail, how many Americans lived during the Constitutional era. She depicts the life of the traveling book peddler, the harsh lot of the printer, the shortcomings of early American schools, the ambiguous politics of novelists like Brackenridge and Tyler, and the lost lives of ordinary women like Tabitha Tenney and Patty Rogers. Drawing on a vast body of material--the novels themselves as well as reviews, inscriptions in cherished books, letters and diaries, and many other records--Davidson presents the genesis of American literature in its fullest possible context.

American Women Writers

Author: Taryn Benbow-Pfalzgraf
Publisher: Saint James Press
ISBN: 9781558624313
Size: 42.39 MB
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Contains biographical and critical essays on 1,328 American women writers covering all genres and all periods of American history.