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The Courtesan And The Gigolo

Author: Aaron Freundschuh
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 1503600971
Size: 53.77 MB
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The intrigue began with a triple homicide in a luxury apartment building just steps from the Champs-Elyseés, in March 1887. A high-class prostitute and two others, one of them a child, had been stabbed to death—the latest in a string of unsolved murders targeting women of the Parisian demimonde. Newspapers eagerly reported the lurid details, and when the police arrested Enrico Pranzini, a charismatic and handsome Egyptian migrant, the story became an international sensation. As the case descended into scandal and papers fanned the flames of anti-immigrant politics, the investigation became thoroughly enmeshed with the crisis-driven political climate of the French Third Republic and the rise of xenophobic right-wing movements. Aaron Freundschuh's account of the "Pranzini Affair" recreates not just the intricacies of the investigation and the raucous courtroom trial, but also the jockeying for status among rival players—reporters, police detectives, doctors, and magistrates—who all stood to gain professional advantage and prestige. Freundschuh deftly weaves together the sensational details of the case with the social and political undercurrents of the time, arguing that the racially charged portrayal of Pranzini reflects a mounting anxiety about the colonial "Other" within France's own borders. Pranzini's case provides a window into a transformational decade for the history of immigration, nationalism, and empire in France.

The Courtesan And The Gigolo

Author: Aaron Freundschuh
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781503600157
Size: 17.90 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 6250
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The intrigue began with a triple homicide in a luxury apartment building just steps from the Champs-Elyseés, in March 1887. A high-class prostitute and two others, one of them a child, had been stabbed to death--the latest in a string of unsolved murders targeting women of the Parisian demimonde. Newspapers eagerly reported the lurid details, and when the police arrested Enrico Pranzini, a charismatic and handsome Egyptian migrant, the story became an international sensation. As the case descended into scandal and papers fanned the flames of anti-immigrant politics, the investigation became thoroughly enmeshed with the crisis-driven political climate of the French Third Republic and the rise of xenophobic right-wing movements. Aaron Freundschuh's account of the "Pranzini Affair" recreates not just the raucous courtroom trial and the grotesque aftermath of Pranzini's public guillotining, but also the jockeying for status among rival players--reporters, police detectives, doctors, and magistrates--who all stood to gain professional advantage and prestige. Freundschuh deftly weaves together the sensational details of the case with the social and political undercurrents of the time, arguing that the racially charged portrayal of Pranzini reflects a mounting anxiety about the colonial "Other" within France's own borders. Pranzini's case provides a window into a transformational decade for the history of immigration, nationalism, and empire in France.

The Courtesan And The Gigolo

Author: Aaron Freundschuh
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 1503600823
Size: 37.37 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 1802
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The intrigue began with a triple homicide in a luxury apartment building just steps from the Champs-Elyseés, in March 1887. A high-class prostitute and two others, one of them a child, had been stabbed to death—the latest in a string of unsolved murders targeting women of the Parisian demimonde. Newspapers eagerly reported the lurid details, and when the police arrested Enrico Pranzini, a charismatic and handsome Egyptian migrant, the story became an international sensation. As the case descended into scandal and papers fanned the flames of anti-immigrant politics, the investigation became thoroughly enmeshed with the crisis-driven political climate of the French Third Republic and the rise of xenophobic right-wing movements. Aaron Freundschuh's account of the "Pranzini Affair" recreates not just the intricacies of the investigation and the raucous courtroom trial, but also the jockeying for status among rival players—reporters, police detectives, doctors, and magistrates—who all stood to gain professional advantage and prestige. Freundschuh deftly weaves together the sensational details of the case with the social and political undercurrents of the time, arguing that the racially charged portrayal of Pranzini reflects a mounting anxiety about the colonial "Other" within France's own borders. Pranzini's case provides a window into a transformational decade for the history of immigration, nationalism, and empire in France.

Tacoma Confidential

Author: Paul LaRosa
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101098318
Size: 66.65 MB
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Gig Harbor, WA, a quiet Tacoma suburb, knew little of tragedy and scandal—until April 26, 2003. On that day David Brame, distraught over his impending divorce, shot his wife to death in a busy public parking lot. Then, with the couple’s two children only feet away, he turned the gun on himself. It was a horrific event, but Tacoma residents had special reason to be shocked. Many would have considered Brame their city’s least likely murderer. He was, after all, the chief of police. . . . But as the investigation unfolded, another side of Brame and his marriage came to light. Bizarre behavior. Years of abuse. Liaisons with multiple partners—and constant death threats. Here, in chilling detail, is the full story of Gig Harbor’s most violent and disturbing crime, meticulously pieced together by an award-winning newsman. Every secret is revealed—even the most confidential.

Paradise Destroyed

Author: Christopher M. Church
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 1496204514
Size: 39.23 MB
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Over a span of thirty years in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the French Caribbean islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe endured natural catastrophes from all the elements—earth, wind, fire, and water—as well as a collapsing sugar industry, civil unrest, and political intrigue. These disasters thrust a long history of societal and economic inequities into the public sphere as officials and citizens weighed the importance of social welfare, exploitative economic practices, citizenship rights, racism, and governmental responsibility. Paradise Destroyed explores the impact of natural and man-made disasters in the turn-of-the-century French Caribbean, examining the social, economic, and political implications of shared citizenship in times of civil unrest. French nationalists projected a fantasy of assimilation onto the Caribbean, where the predominately nonwhite population received full French citizenship and governmental representation. When disaster struck in the faraway French West Indies—whether the whirlwinds of a hurricane or a vast workers' strike—France faced a tempest at home as politicians, journalists, and economists, along with the general population, debated the role of the French state not only in the Antilles but in their own lives as well. Environmental disasters brought to the fore existing racial and social tensions and held to the fire France’s ideological convictions of assimilation and citizenship. Christopher M. Church shows how France’s “old colonies” laid claim to a definition of tropical French-ness amid the sociopolitical and cultural struggles of a fin de siècle France riddled with social unrest and political divisions.

Coco Chanel

Author: Lisa Chaney
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101545860
Size: 15.22 MB
Format: PDF
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The controversial story of Chanel, the twentieth century's foremost fashion icon. Revolutionizing women's dress, Gabrielle "Coco'' Chanel was the twentieth century's most influential designer. Her extraordinary and unconventional journey-from abject poverty to a new kind of glamour- helped forge the idea of modern woman. Unearthing an astonishing life, this remarkable biography shows how, more than any previous designer, Chanel became synonymous with a rebellious and progressive style. Her numerous liaisons, whose poignant and tragic details have eluded all previous biographers, were the very stuff of legend. Witty and mesmerizing, she became muse, patron, or mistress to the century's most celebrated artists, including Picasso, Dalí, and Stravinsky. Drawing on newly discovered love letters and other records, Chaney's controversial book reveals the truth about Chanel's drug habit and lesbian affairs. And the question about Chanel's German lover during World War II (was he a spy for the Nazis?) is definitively answered. While uniquely highlighting the designer's far-reaching influence on the modern arts, Chaney's fascinating biography paints a deeper and darker picture of Coco Chanel than any so far. Movingly, it explores the origins, the creative power, and the secret suffering of this exceptional and often misread woman.

Sentimental Savants

Author: Meghan K. Roberts
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022638411X
Size: 28.63 MB
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The Enlightenment was not an austere age of reason but rather a time when reason and emotion, science and sensibility, public and private, went neatly hand in hand. This book examines how the thinkers of the age attempted to live the Enlightenment, and it is a story that starts at home. "Sentimental Savants "is the first book to explore how and why the savants of the French Enlightenment embraced their family and domestic lives as no previous generation of intellectuals had done before. Meghan Roberts explores the effect this had on their scientific and intellectual labors by cleverly surveying their new domestic arrangements and by documenting their experiments in domestic knowledge-making. Her case studies include the inoculation debates, child-rearing and pedagogy, and family laboratory-work, and together they paint a striking portrait of how sentiment and reason interacted in the eighteenth century to produce new kinds of families and new kinds of knowledge. "

Historical Dictionary Of The Fashion Industry

Author: Francesca Sterlacci
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442239093
Size: 47.25 MB
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This second edition of Historical Dictionary of the Fashion Industry contains a chronology, an introduction, appendixes, a bibliography. The dictionary section has over 1,400 cross-referenced entries on designers, models, couture houses, significant articles of apparel and fabrics, trade unions, and the international trade organizations.

The Mistress Of Paris

Author: Catherine Hewitt
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1250120675
Size: 32.49 MB
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Catherine Hewitt's The Mistress of Paris is a fantastically readable biography of a nineteenth-century Parisian courtesan who harbored an incredible secret. “A gorgeous, smart, ambitious, hard-working, steely autodidact and businesswoman whose product was herself, Valtesse would be totally at home in our self-branding society.” —The New York Times Book Review Comtesse Valtesse de la Bigne was painted by Édouard Manet and inspired Émile Zola, who immortalized her in his scandalous novel Nana. Her rumored affairs with Napoleon III and the future King Edward VII kept gossip columns full. But her glamorous existence hid a dark secret: she was no comtesse. Valtesse was born into abject poverty, raised on a squalid backstreet among the dregs of Parisian society. Yet she transformed herself into an enchantress who possessed a small fortune, three mansions, fabulous carriages, and art the envy of connoisseurs across Europe. A consummate show-woman, she ensured that her life—and even her death—remained shrouded in just enough mystery to keep her audience hungry for more. Spectacularly evoking the sights and sounds of mid- to late nineteenth-century Paris in all its hedonistic glory, Catherine Hewitt’s biography tells, for the first time ever in English, the forgotten story of a remarkable woman who, though her roots were lowly, never stopped aiming high.