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The Day Freedom Died

Author: Charles Lane
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 9781429936781
Size: 54.80 MB
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The untold story of the slaying of a Southern town's ex-slaves and a white lawyer's historic battle to bring the perpretators to justice Following the Civil War, Colfax, Louisiana, was a town, like many, where African Americans and whites mingled uneasily. But on April 13, 1873, a small army of white ex–Confederate soldiers, enraged after attempts by freedmen to assert their new rights, killed more than sixty African Americans who had occupied a courthouse. With skill and tenacity, The Washington Post's Charles Lane transforms this nearly forgotten incident into a riveting historical saga. Seeking justice for the slain, one brave U.S. attorney, James Beckwith, risked his life and career to investigate and punish the perpetrators—but they all went free. What followed was a series of courtroom dramas that culminated at the Supreme Court, where the justices' verdict compromised the victories of the Civil War and left Southern blacks at the mercy of violent whites for generations. The Day Freedom Died is an electrifying piece of historical detective work that captures a gallery of characters from presidents to townspeople, and re-creates the bloody days of Reconstruction, when the often brutal struggle for equality moved from the battlefield into communities across the nation.

The Day Freedom Died

Author: Charles Lane
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0805083421
Size: 77.15 MB
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Following the Civil War, Colfax, Louisiana, was a town, like many, where Negroes and whites mingled uneasily. But on April 13, 1873, a small army of white ex-Confederate soldiers, enraged after attempts by freedmen to assert their new rights, killed moret

The Colfax Massacre

Author: LeeAnna Keith
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195393082
Size: 75.89 MB
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Drawing on a large body of documents, including eyewitness accounts and evidence from the site itself, Keith explores the racial tensions that led to the Colfax massacre - during which surrendering blacks were mercilessly slaughtered - and the reverberations this message of terror sent throughout the South.

The Forgotten Memoir Of John Knox

Author: John Knox
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226448626
Size: 30.44 MB
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Recapturing life in Washington, D.C., when it was still a genteel Southern town, this personal memoir was written by law clerk John Knox (1907-1997), private secretary to U.S. Supreme Court Justice James C. McReynolds. 16 halftones.

What This Cruel War Was Over

Author: Chandra Manning
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307267431
Size: 79.44 MB
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In this unprecedented account, Chandra Manning uses letters, diaries, and regimental newspapers to take the reader inside the minds of Civil War soldiers-black and white, Northern and Southern-as they fought and marched across a divided country. With stunning poise and narrative verve, Manning explores how the Union and Confederate soldiers came to identify slavery as the central issue of the war and what that meant for a tumultuous nation. This is a brilliant and eye-opening debut and an invaluable addition to our understanding of the Civil War as it has never been rendered before. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Justice Of Shattered Dreams

Author: Michael Anthony Ross
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 9780807129241
Size: 14.16 MB
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"Best known for his opinions in cases dealing with race and the Fourteenth Amendment particularly the 1873 Slaughter-House Cases, Miller has often been considered a misguided opponent of Reconstruction and racial equality. In this major reinterpretation, Ross argues that historians have failed to study the evolution of Miller's views during the war and explains how Miller, a former slave-holder, became a champion of African Americans' economic and political rights. He was also the staunchest supporter on the Court of Lincoln's controversial war measures, including the decision to suspend such civil liberties as habeas corpus." "The first biography of Miller since 1939, this welcome volume draws on Miller's previously unavailable papers to shed new light on a man who saw his dreams for America shattered but whose essential political and social values, as well as his personal integrity, remained intact."--BOOK JACKET.

Inherently Unequal

Author: Lawrence Goldstone
Publisher: Walker
ISBN: 9780802778857
Size: 28.10 MB
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A potent and original examination of how the Supreme Court subverted justice and empowered the Jim Crow era. In the years following the Civil War, the 13th Amendment abolished slavery; the 14th conferred citizenship and equal protection under the law to white and black; and the 15th gave black American males the right to vote. In 1875, the most comprehensive civil rights legislation in the nation's history granted all Americans "the full and equal enjoyment" of public accommodations. Just eight years later, the Supreme Court, by an 8-1 vote, overturned the Civil Rights Act as unconstitutional and, in the process, disemboweled the equal protection provisions of the 14th Amendment. Using court records and accounts of the period, Lawrence Goldstone chronicles how "by the dawn of the 20th century the U.S. had become the nation of Jim Crow laws, quasi-slavery, and precisely the same two-tiered system of justice that had existed in the slave era." The very human story of how and why this happened make Inherently Unequal as important as it is provocative. Examining both celebrated decisions like Plessy v. Ferguson and those often overlooked, Goldstone demonstrates how the Supreme Court turned a blind eye to the obvious reality of racism, defending instead the business establishment and status quo--thereby legalizing the brutal prejudice that came to define the Jim Crow era.

Roman Disasters

Author: Jerry Toner
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745665497
Size: 27.20 MB
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Roman Disasters looks at how the Romans coped with, thought about, and used disasters for their own ends. Rome has been famous throughout history for its great triumphs. Yet Rome also suffered colossal disasters. From the battle of Cannae, where fifty thousand men fell in a single day, to the destruction of Pompeii, to the first appearance of the bubonic plague, the Romans experienced large scale calamities.Earthquakes, fires, floods and famines also regularly afflicted them. This insightful book is the first to treat such disasters as a conceptual unity. It shows that vulnerability to disasters was affected by politics, social status, ideology and economics. Above all, it illustrates how the resilience of their political and cultural system allowed the Romans to survive the impact of these life-threatening events. The book also explores the important role disaster narratives played in Christian thought and rhetoric. Engaging and accessible, Roman Disasters will be enjoyed by students and general readers alike.

Death In The Haymarket

Author: James Green
Publisher: Anchor Canada
ISBN: 1400033225
Size: 68.34 MB
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A study of America's early labor movement and the 1886 Haymarket bombing at a Chicaco labor rally that killed several police officers discusses the events of the infamous attack, its sensational aftermath, and its devastating repercussions in terms of the growing union movement. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.