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The End Of Normal

Author: Lennard Davis
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472052020
Size: 74.46 MB
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Provocative essays that challenge notions of the “normal” in the new century

Enforcing Normalcy

Author: Lennard J. Davis
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1784780006
Size: 74.43 MB
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In this highly original study of the cultural assumptions governing our conception of people with disabilities, Lennard J. Davis argues forcefully against “ableist” discourse and for a complete recasting of the category of disability itself. Enforcing Normalcy surveys the emergence of a cluster of concepts around the term “normal” as these matured in western Europe and the United States over the past 250 years. Linking such notions to the concurrent emergence of discourses about the nation, Davis shows how the modern nation-state constructed its identity on the backs not only of colonized subjects, but of its physically disabled minority. In a fascinating chapter on contemporary cultural theory, Davis explores the pitfalls of privileging the figure of sight in conceptualizing the nature of textuality. And in a treatment of nudes and fragmented bodies in Western art, he shows how the ideal of physical wholeness is both demanded and denied in the classical aesthetics of representation. Enforcing Normalcy redraws the boundaries of political and cultural discourse. By insisting that disability be added to the familiar triad of race, class and gender, the book challenges progressives to expand the limits of their thinking about human oppression. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Enabling Acts

Author: Lennard J. Davis
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807059293
Size: 59.63 MB
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"This book is the first major book to focus exclusively on the history and impact of the ADA which was the widest ranging piece of civil rights legislation in the history of the United States and has become the model for most civil rights laws around the world. Yet the history isn't a dry account of bills and speeches. Rather it tells the fascinating story of how a group of leftist Berkeley hippies managed to make an alliance with upper-crust, conservative Republicans to bring about a truly bi-partisan bill. It covers how major politicians fought in public while staffers hammered out the details amidst public demonstrations by disability activists providing momentum for all. The book provides behind the scenes accounts and never-before published intrigues that led to a successful outcome. In addition, the book will assess the impact and legacy of the ADA through the stories of individuals who have been affected by the legislation"--

Disability Spaces And Places Of Policy Exclusion

Author: Karen Soldatic
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135008760
Size: 53.28 MB
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Geographies of disability have become a key research priority for many disability scholars and geographers. This edited collection, incorporating the work of leading international disability researchers, seeks to expand the current geographical frame operating within the realm of disability. Providing a critical and comprehensive examination of disability and spatial processes of exclusion and inclusion for disabled people, the book uniquely brings together insights from disability studies, spatial geographies and social policy with the purpose of exploring how spatial factors shape, limit or enhance policy towards, and the experiences of, disabled people. Divided into two parts, the first section explores the key concepts to have emerged within the field of disability geographies, and their relationship to new policy regimes. New and emerging concepts within the field are critically explored for their significance in conceptually framing disability. The second section provides an in-depth examination of disabled people’s experience of changing landscapes within the onset of emerging disability policy regimes. It deals with how the various actors and stakeholders, such as governments, social care agencies, families and disabled people traverse these landscapes under the new conditions laid out by changing policy regimes. Crucially, the chapters examine the lived meaning of changing spatial relations for disabled people. Grounded in recent empirical research, and with a global focus, each of the chapters reveal how social policy domains are challenged or undermined by the spatial realities faced by disabled people, and expands existing understandings of disability. In turn, the book supports readers to grasp future policy directions and processes that enable disabled people's choices, rights and participation. This important work will be invaluable reading for students and researchers involved in disability, geography and social policy.

The Disability Studies Reader

Author: Lennard J. Davis
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317397851
Size: 54.95 MB
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The fifth edition of The Disability Studies Reader addresses the post-identity theoretical landscape by emphasizing questions of interdependency and independence, the human–animal relationship, and issues around the construction or materiality of gender, the body, and sexuality. Selections explore the underlying biases of medical and scientific experiments and explode the binary of the sound and the diseased mind. The collection addresses physical disabilities, but as always investogates issues around pain, mental disability, and invisible disabilities as well. Featuring a new generation of scholars who are dealing with the most current issues, the fifth edition continues the Reader’s tradition of remaining timely, urgent, and critical.

Cultures Of Representation

Author: Benjamin Fraser
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231850964
Size: 27.50 MB
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Cultures of Representation is the first book to explore the cinematic portrayal of disability in films from across the globe. Contributors explore classic and recent works from Belgium, France, Germany, India, Italy, Iran, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Netherlands, Russia, Senegal, and Spain, along with a pair of globally resonant Anglophone films. Anchored by David T. Mitchell and Sharon L. Snyder's coauthored essay on global disability-film festivals, the volume's content spans from 1950 to today, addressing socially disabling forces rendered visible in the representation of physical, developmental, cognitive, and psychiatric disabilities. Essays emphasize well-known global figures, directors, and industries – from Temple Grandin to Pedro Almodóvar, from Akira Kurosawa to Bollywood – while also shining a light on films from less frequently studied cultural locations such as those portrayed in the Iranian and Korean New Waves. Whether covering postwar Italy, postcolonial Senegal, or twenty-first century Russia, the essays in this volume will appeal to scholars, undergraduates, and general readers alike.

Tackling Disability Discrimination And Disability Hate Crime

Author: Paul Giannasi
Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
ISBN: 0857009419
Size: 22.76 MB
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Placing the experiences of victims at its heart, this book provides an authoritative overview of disability hate crime - explaining what it is, how it happens, its legal status, the impact on victims and how individuals and agencies should respond. The guide outlines innovative projects developed to address the problem, and provides tailored guidance for professionals spanning education, health and social care, and criminal justice. It also offers recommendations for effective multi-agency working. After highlighting the crimes committed against disabled people and society's failure to protect them, the book concludes with a powerful argument for cross-government action to improve professional practice and eliminate disability-motivated hate crime.

Elsewhere In America

Author: David Trend
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317225430
Size: 63.82 MB
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Americans think of their country as a welcoming place where everyone has equal opportunity. Yet historical baggage and anxious times can restrain these possibilities. Newcomers often find that civic belonging comes with strings attached––riddled with limitations or legally punitive rites of passage. For those already here, new challenges to civic belonging emerge on the basis of belief, behavior, or heritage. This book uses the term "elsewhere" in describing conditions that exile so many citizens to "some other place" through prejudice, competition, or discordant belief. Yet, in another way, "elsewhere" evokes an undefined "not yet" ripe with potential. In the face of America’s daunting challenges, can "elsewhere" point to optimism, hope, and common purpose? Through 12 detailed chapters, the book applies critical theory in the humanities and social sciences to examine recurring crises of social inclusion in the U.S. After two centuries of incremental "progress" in securing human dignity, today the U.S. finds itself torn by new conflicts over reproductive rights, immigration, health care, religious extremism, sexual orientation, mental illness, and fear of terrorists. Is there a way of explaining this recurring tendency of Americans to turn against each other? Elsewhere in America engages these questions, charting the ever-changing faces of difference (manifest in contested landscapes of sex and race to such areas as disability and mental health), their spectral and intersectional character (recent discourses on performativity, normativity, and queer theory), and the grounds on which categories are manifest in ideation and movement politics (metapolitics, cosmopolitanism, dismodernism).

Cops And Docs In America After A Bioterrorist Attack Or Ebola Outbreak Will They Help Us

Author: Dennis J. Stevens
Publisher: AuthorHouse
ISBN: 150492374X
Size: 40.71 MB
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Cops and Docs in America is an account of disaster victims and the quality of care administered by justice and healthcare providers obligated by certification, regulation, and policy. This book represents a dialogue of the decisions made about deserving or undeserving victims. Its a story void of social justice resulting in the preventable death of Americas marginalized underserving populations before a bioterrorist attack or an infectious disease outbreak. Its no longer if an attack or outbreak will happen - its in progress orchestrated by ISIS trained agitators fueling race-hate and suicide disease carriers in American prisons.

Supernatural As Natural

Author: Michael Winkelman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317343735
Size: 40.43 MB
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This book provides a general introduction to the biological and evolutionary bases of religion and is suitable for introductory level courses in the anthropology and psychology of religion and comparative religion. Why did human ancestors everywhere adopt religious beliefs and customs? The presence and persistence of many religious features across the globe and time suggests that it is natural for humans to believe in the supernatural. In this new text, the authors explore both the biological and cultural dimensions of religion and the evolutionary origins of religious features.