Download the face that launched a thousand lawsuits the american women who forged a right to privacy yale law library series in legal history and reference in pdf or read the face that launched a thousand lawsuits the american women who forged a right to privacy yale law library series in legal history and reference in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get the face that launched a thousand lawsuits the american women who forged a right to privacy yale law library series in legal history and reference in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



The Face That Launched A Thousand Lawsuits

Author: Jessica Lake
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 030022530X
Size: 41.43 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 5209
Download and Read
A compelling account of how women shaped the common law right to privacy during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries Drawing on a wealth of original research, Jessica Lake documents how the advent of photography and cinema drove women—whose images were being taken and circulated without their consent—to court. There they championed the creation of new laws and laid the groundwork for America’s commitment to privacy. Vivid and engagingly written, this powerful work will draw scholars and students from a range of fields, including law, women’s history, the history of photography, and cinema and media studies.

The Ages Of American Law

Author: Grant Gilmore
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 030021104X
Size: 38.91 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 2907
Download and Read
Following its publication in 1974, Grant Gilmore's compact portrait of the development of American law from the eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century became a classic. In this new edition, the portrait is brought up to date with a new chapter by Philip Bobbitt that surveys the trajectory of American law since the original publication. Bobbitt also provides a Foreword on Gilmore and the celebrated lectures that inspired The Ages of American Law. "Sharp, opinionated, and as pungent as cheddar."—New Republic "This book has the engaging qualities of good table talk among a group of sophisticated and educated friends—given body by broad learning and a keen imagination and spiced with wit."—Willard Hurst

The Origins Of Reasonable Doubt

Author: James Q. Whitman
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300116007
Size: 48.62 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 6240
Download and Read
To be convicted of a crime in the United States, a person must be proven guilty “beyond a reasonable doubt.” But what is reasonable doubt? Even sophisticated legal experts find this fundamental doctrine difficult to explain. In this accessible book, James Q. Whitman digs deep into the history of the law and discovers that we have lost sight of the original purpose of “reasonable doubt.” It was not originally a legal rule at all, he shows, but a theological one. The rule as we understand it today is intended to protect the accused. But Whitman traces its history back through centuries of Christian theology and common-law history to reveal that the original concern was to protect the souls of jurors. In Christian tradition, a person who experienced doubt yet convicted an innocent defendant was guilty of a mortal sin. Jurors fearful for their own souls were reassured that they were safe, as long as their doubts were not “reasonable.” Today, the old rule of reasonable doubt survives, but it has been turned to different purposes. The result is confusion for jurors, and a serious moral challenge for our system of justice.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton And The Feminist Foundations Of Family Law

Author: Tracy A. Thomas
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081478304X
Size: 71.44 MB
Format: PDF
View: 577
Download and Read
Much has been written about women’s rights pioneer Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Historians have written her biography, detailed her campaign for woman’s suffrage, documented her partnership with Susan B. Anthony, and compiled all of her extensive writings and papers. Stanton herself was a prolific author; her autobiography, History of Woman Suffrage, and Woman’s Bible are classics. Despite this body of work, scholars and feminists continue to find new and insightful ways to re-examine Stanton and her impact on women’s rights and history. Law scholar Tracy A. Thomas extends this discussion of Stanton’s impact on modern-day feminism by analyzing her intellectual contributions to—and personal experiences with—family law. Stanton’s work on family issues has been overshadowed by her work (especially with Susan B. Anthony) on woman’s suffrage. But throughout her fifty-year career, Stanton emphasized reform of the private sphere of the family as central to achieving women’s equality. By weaving together law, feminist theory, and history, Thomas explores Stanton’s little-examined philosophies on and proposals for women’s equality in marriage, divorce, and family, and reveals that the campaigns for equal gender roles in the family that came to the fore in the 1960s and ’70s had nineteenth-century roots. Using feminist legal theory as a lens to interpret Stanton’s political, legal, and personal work on the family, Thomas argues that Stanton’s positions on divorce, working mothers, domestic violence, childcare, and many other topics were strikingly progressive for her time, providing significant parallels from which to gauge the social and legal policy issues confronting women in marriage and the family today.

Engines Of Truth

Author: Wendie Ellen Schneider
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300216556
Size: 45.82 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5626
Download and Read
During the Victorian era, new laws allowed more witnesses to testify in court cases. At the same time, an emerging cultural emphasis on truth-telling drove the development of new ways of inhibiting perjury. Strikingly original and drawing on a broad array of archival research, Wendie Schneider’s examination of the Victorian courtroom charts this period of experimentation and how its innovations shaped contemporary trial procedure. Blending legal, social, and colonial history, she shines new light on cross-examination, the most enduring product of this time and the “greatest legal engine ever invented for the discovery of truth.”

Congress S Constitution

Author: Josh Chafetz
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300197101
Size: 63.84 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 7684
Download and Read
A leading scholar of Congress and the Constitution analyzes Congress's surprisingly potent set of tools in the system of checks and balances. Congress is widely supposed to be the least effective branch of the federal government. But as Josh Chafetz shows in this boldly original analysis, Congress in fact has numerous powerful tools at its disposal in its conflicts with the other branches. These tools include the power of the purse, the contempt power, freedom of speech and debate, and more. Drawing extensively on the historical development of Anglo-American legislatures from the seventeenth century to the present, Chafetz concludes that these tools are all means by which Congress and its members battle for public support. When Congress uses them to engage successfully with the public, it increases its power vis-�-vis the other branches; when it does not, it loses power. This groundbreaking take on the separation of powers will be of interest to both legal scholars and political scientists.

Inventing American Exceptionalism

Author: Amalia D. Kessler
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300198078
Size: 51.44 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 7437
Download and Read
A highly engaging account of the developments--not only legal, but also socioeconomic, political, and cultural--that gave rise to Americans' distinctively lawyer-driven legal culture When Americans imagine their legal system, it is the adversarial trial--dominated by dueling larger-than-life lawyers undertaking grand public performances--that first comes to mind. But as award-winning author Amalia Kessler reveals in this engrossing history, it was only in the turbulent decades before the Civil War that adversarialism became a defining American practice and ideology, displacing alternative, more judge-driven approaches to procedure. By drawing on a broad range of methods and sources--and by recovering neglected influences (including from Europe)--the author shows how the emergence of the American adversarial legal culture was a product not only of developments internal to law, but also of wider socioeconomic, political, and cultural debates over whether and how to undertake market regulation and pursue racial equality. As a result, adversarialism came to play a key role in defining American legal institutions and practices, as well as national identity.

Antitrust Paradox

Author: Robert H. Bork
Publisher: Free Press
ISBN: 9780029044568
Size: 75.63 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 3158
Download and Read
Since it first appeared in 1978, this seminal work by one of the foremost American legal minds of our age has dramatically changed the way the courts view government's role in private affairs. Now reissued with a new introduction and epilogue by the author, this classic shows how antitrust suits adversely affect the consumer by encouraging a costly form of protection for inefficient and uncompetitive small businesses. Robert Bork's view of antitrust law has had a profound impact on how the law has been both interpreted and applied. The Antitrust Paradox illustrates how the purpose and integrity of law can be subverted by those who do not understand the reality law addresses or who seek to make it serve unintended political and social ends. - Back cover.

The Future Of Reputation

Author: Daniel J. Solove
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300138191
Size: 31.50 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 7377
Download and Read
Teeming with chatrooms, online discussion groups, and blogs, the Internet offers previously unimagined opportunities for personal expression and communication. But there's a dark side to the story. A trail of information fragments about us is forever preserved on the Internet, instantly available in a Google search. A permanent chronicle of our private lives, often of dubious reliability and sometimes totally false, will follow us wherever we go, accessible to friends, strangers, dates, employers, neighbours, relatives, and anyone else who cares to look. This engrossing book, brimming with amazing examples of gossip, slander, and rumour on the Internet, explores the profound implications of the online collision between free speech and privacy. Daniel Solove, an authority on information privacy law, offers a fascinating account of how the Internet is transforming gossip, the way we shame others, and our ability to protect our own reputations. Focusing on blogs, Internet communities, cybermobs, and other current trends, he shows that, ironically, the unconstrained flow of information on the Internet may impede opportunities for self-development and freedom. Long-standing notions of privacy need review, the author contends: unless we establish a balance between privacy and free speech, we may discover that the freedom of the Internet makes us less free.

The Criterion For Distinguishing Legal Opinions From Judicial Rulings And The Administrative Acts Of Judges And Rulers

Author: Shihab al-Din Ahmad ibn Idris al-Qarafi al-Maliki
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300191154
Size: 30.62 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5983
Download and Read
The first and much-needed English translation of a thirteenth-century text that shaped the development of Islamic law in the late middle ages. Scholars of Islamic law can find few English language translations of foundational Islamic legal texts, particularly from the understudied Mamluk era. In this edition of the Tamyiz, Mohammad Fadel addresses this gap, finally making the great Muslim jurist Shihab al-Din al-Qarafi's seminal work available to a wider audience. Al-Qarafi's examination of the distinctions among judicial rulings, which were final and unassailable, legal opinions, which were advisory and not binding, and administrative actions, which were binding but amenable to subsequent revision, remained standard for centuries and are still actively debated today.