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The Failed Promise Of Sentencing Reform

Author: Michael O'Hear
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440840881
Size: 34.77 MB
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Despite 15 years of reform efforts, the incarceration rate in the United States remains at an unprecedented high level. This book provides the first comprehensive survey of these reforms and explains why they have proven to be ineffective. • Clearly identifies the real reasons that the wave of post-2000 sentencing reform has had minimal impact on reducing national imprisonment rates • Explains why reforms must target the excessive sentences imposed on violent and sexual offenders, even though the members of these offender groups are considered "justifiably punished" by long prison terms in the public eye • Enables readers to understand why increased consideration for the well-being of offenders and their families is likely a prerequisite to the acceptance of more fundamental changes to the U.S. sentencing system

Determinate Sentencing

Author: Pamala L. Griset
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791405352
Size: 17.14 MB
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This book discusses in depth the rise and fall of the determinate ideal, once heralded as a replacement to the old order of criminal justice. Using new materials and combining political, empirical, and theoretical perspectives, Griset examines the attempt in New York State to establish determinate sentencing — “punishment for its own sake” — to replace the existing policy of rehabilitation. In portraying New York’s experience against the backdrop of a national reform agenda, she analyzes the development and ultimate failure of a major social movement.

America S Courts And The Criminal Justice System

Author: David W. Neubauer
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1337670146
Size: 67.14 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The premier choice for Courts courses for decades, this popular text offers a comprehensive explanation of the courts and the criminal justice system, presented in a streamlined, straightforward manner that appeals to instructors and students alike. Neubauer and Fradella's crisp and clear writing, characterized by the organization of material into brief sections within chapters, ensures that readers gain a firm handle on the material. At the same time, the text's innovative courtroom workhouse model -- which focuses on the interrelationships among the judge, prosecutor, and defense attorney -- brings the courtroom to life. AMERICA'S COURTS AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM has long been known for the way it gives students an accurate glimpse of what it is like to work within the American criminal justice system, and the thirteenth edition is no exception. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Sentencing Reform In Overcrowded Times

Author: Michael Tonry
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195344455
Size: 24.87 MB
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Sentencing and corrections issues are much the same in every Western nation. Increasingly, countries are importing policies and practices that have succeeded elsewhere. In that spirit, this volume brings together articles on sentencing reform in the United States, other English-speaking countries, and Western Europe, all written by leading national and international authorities on sentencing and punishment policy, practices, and institutions. Timely and readable, many of these essays provide brief yet detailed sentencing policy histories for countries and states. Others offer concise overviews of research on racial disparities, public opinion, and evaluation of the effects of new policies. Together, they illustrate the radical, precipitate, and hyperpoliticized nature of American sentencing reform in the last twenty-five years. Sentencing Reform in Overcrowded Times: A Comparative Perspective fills a major gap in the academic and policy literatures on this subject, and will be essential reading for students, scholars, and practitioners.

The New Jim Crow

Author: Michelle Alexander
Publisher: Antje Kunstmann
ISBN: 3956141598
Size: 24.76 MB
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Die Wahl von Barack Obama im November 2008 markierte einen historischen Wendepunkt in den USA: Der erste schwarze Präsident schien für eine postrassistische Gesellschaft und den Triumph der Bürgerrechtsbewegung zu stehen. Doch die Realität in den USA ist eine andere. Obwohl die Rassentrennung, die in den sogenannten Jim-Crow-Gesetzen festgeschrieben war, im Zuge der Bürgerrechtsbewegung abgeschafft wurde, sitzt heute ein unfassbar hoher Anteil der schwarzen Bevölkerung im Gefängnis oder ist lebenslang als kriminell gebrandmarkt. Ein Status, der die Leute zu Bürgern zweiter Klasse macht, indem er sie ihrer grundsätzlichsten Rechte beraubt – ganz ähnlich den explizit rassistischen Diskriminierungen der Jim-Crow-Ära. In ihrem Buch, das in Amerika eine breite Debatte ausgelöst hat, argumentiert Michelle Alexander, dass die USA ihr rassistisches System nach der Bürgerrechtsbewegung nicht abgeschafft, sondern lediglich umgestaltet haben. Da unter dem perfiden Deckmantel des »War on Drugs« überproportional junge männliche Schwarze und ihre Communities kriminalisiert werden, funktioniert das drakonische Strafjustizsystem der USA heute wie das System rassistischer Kontrolle von gestern: ein neues Jim Crow.

The First Civil Right

Author: Naomi Murakawa
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199380724
Size: 33.53 MB
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The explosive rise in the U.S. incarceration rate in the second half of the twentieth century, and the racial transformation of the prison population from mostly white at mid-century to sixty-five percent black and Latino in the present day, is a trend that cannot easily be ignored. Many believe that this shift began with the "tough on crime" policies advocated by Republicans and southern Democrats beginning in the late 1960s, which sought longer prison sentences, more frequent use of the death penalty, and the explicit or implicit targeting of politically marginalized people. In The First Civil Right, Naomi Murakawa inverts the conventional wisdom by arguing that the expansion of the federal carceral state-a system that disproportionately imprisons blacks and Latinos-was, in fact, rooted in the civil-rights liberalism of the 1940s and early 1960s, not in the period after. Murakawa traces the development of the modern American prison system through several presidencies, both Republican and Democrat. Responding to calls to end the lawlessness and violence against blacks at the state and local levels, the Truman administration expanded the scope of what was previously a weak federal system. Later administrations from Johnson to Clinton expanded the federal presence even more. Ironically, these steps laid the groundwork for the creation of the vast penal archipelago that now exists in the United States. What began as a liberal initiative to curb the mob violence and police brutality that had deprived racial minorities of their 'first civil right-physical safety-eventually evolved into the federal correctional system that now deprives them, in unjustly large numbers, of another important right: freedom. The First Civil Right is a groundbreaking analysis of root of the conflicts that lie at the intersection of race and the legal system in America.