Download the failures of integration how race and class are undermining the american dream in pdf or read the failures of integration how race and class are undermining the american dream in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get the failures of integration how race and class are undermining the american dream in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



The Failures Of Integration

Author: Sheryll Cashin
Publisher: Palabra
ISBN: 9781586483395
Size: 55.71 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 7693
Download and Read
Argues that racial segregation is still prevalent in American society and a transformation is necessary to build democracy and eradicate racial barriers.

Dark Ghettos

Author: Tommie Shelby
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 067497462X
Size: 48.22 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 6894
Download and Read
For Tommie Shelby, the persistence of ghettos raises many thorny questions of morality, and he offers practical answers framed in terms of what justice requires of government and its citizens. His social vision and political ethics calls for putting the abolition of ghettos at the center of reform.

Law And The Shaping Of The American Labor Movement

Author: William E. FORBATH
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674037081
Size: 72.86 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 6839
Download and Read
In a richly detailed survey of labor law and labor history, Forbath challenges the notion of American "individualism." He shows that, over time, struggles with the courts and the legal order were crucial in reshaping labor's outlook, driving the labor movement to temper its radical goals.

Tragic Failure

Author: Tom Wicker
Publisher: Harper Perennial
ISBN: 9780688155605
Size: 20.22 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 482
Download and Read
For twenty-five years Tom Wicker wrote for The New York Times with passion and intelligence, educating a generation of readers on important social and political issues of the day. In Tragic Failure, this keen observer assesses the failure of racial integration in America. Thirty years after the landmark achievements of the civil rights movement in the 1960s, racial equality has made little progress and has, in fact, suffered setbacks as issues such as affirmative action, welfare reform, crime, and unemployment have made race the subtext for bitter political debate. Here, Mr. Wicker examines the current state of race relations and proposes some bold solutions-including major political realignment-to the disturbing and complex problems of race in America.

Barack Obama And The Future Of American Politics

Author: Paul Street
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317263405
Size: 78.44 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2616
Download and Read
Many Americans believe Barak Obama represents a hopeful future for America. But does he also reflect the American politics of the past? This book offers the broadest and best-informed understanding on the meaning of the "Obama phenomenon" to date. Paul Street was on the ground throughout the Iowa campaign, and his stories of the rising Obama phenomenon are poignant. Yet the author's background in American political history allows him to explore the deeper meanings of Obama's remarkable political career. He looks at Obama in relation to contemporary issues of class, race, war, and empire. He considers Obama in the context of our nation's political history, with comparisons to FDR, JFK, Bill Clinton, and other leaders. Street finds that the Obama persona, crafted by campaign consultants and filtered through dominant media trends, masks the "change" candidate's adherence to long-prevailing power structures and party doctrines. He shows how American political culture has produced misperceptions by the electorate of Obama's positions and values. Obama is no magical exception to the narrow-spectrum electoral system and ideological culture that have done so much to define and limit the American political tradition. Yet the author suggests key ways in which Obama potentially advances democratic transformation. Street makes recommendations on how citizens can productively respond to and act upon Obama's influence and the broader historical and social forces that have produced his celebrity and relevance. He also lays out a real agenda for change for the new presidential administration, one that addresses the recent failures of democratic politics.

The Agitator S Daughter

Author: Sheryll Cashin
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 0786721723
Size: 34.42 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 4736
Download and Read
During Reconstruction, Herschel V. Cashin was a radical republican legislator who championed black political enfranchisement throughout the South. His grandson, Dr. John L. Cashin, Jr., inherited that passion for social justice and formed an independent Democratic party to counter George Wallace's Dixiecrats, electing more blacks to office than in any Southern state. His "uppity" ways attracted many enemies. Twice the private plane Cashin owned and piloted was sabotaged. His dental office and boyhood home were taken by eminent domain. The IRS pursued him, as did the FBI. Ultimately his passions would lead to ruin and leave his daughter, Sheryll, wondering why he would risk so much. In following generations of Cashins through the eras of slavery, Reconstruction, Jim Crow, civil rights, and post-civil rights political struggles, Sheryll Cashin conveys how she came to embrace being an agitator's daughter with humor, honesty, and love.

Racial Oppression In The Global Metropolis

Author: Paul Louis Street
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742540828
Size: 67.21 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 7325
Download and Read
Anti-black racism is a stark fact in Chicago, illustrated by significant racial inequality in and around contemporary "global" city. Here Street explains this neo-liberal apartheid and its resulting disparity in terms of persistently and deeply racist societal and institutional practices and policies. Racial Oppression in the Global Metropolis criticizes neoconservative and liberal explanations of the black urban crisis, challenges sharp distinctions between present and "past" racism, and proposes ideas for challenging urban racism in the 21st century.

Race Class And Politics In The Cappuccino City

Author: Derek S. Hyra
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022644967X
Size: 80.36 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 2038
Download and Read
For long-time residents of Washington, DC’s Shaw/U Street, the neighborhood has become almost unrecognizable in recent years. Where the city’s most infamous open-air drug market once stood, a farmers’ market now sells grass-fed beef and homemade duck egg ravioli. On the corner where AM.PM carryout used to dish out soul food, a new establishment markets its $28 foie gras burger. Shaw is experiencing a dramatic transformation, from “ghetto” to “gilded ghetto,” where white newcomers are rehabbing homes, developing dog parks, and paving the way for a third wave coffee shop on nearly every block. Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City is an in-depth ethnography of this gilded ghetto. Derek S. Hyra captures here a quickly gentrifying space in which long-time black residents are joined, and variously displaced, by an influx of young, white, relatively wealthy, and/or gay professionals who, in part as a result of global economic forces and the recent development of central business districts, have returned to the cities earlier generations fled decades ago. As a result, America is witnessing the emergence of what Hyra calls “cappuccino cities.” A cappuccino has essentially the same ingredients as a cup of coffee with milk, but is considered upscale, and is double the price. In Hyra’s cappuccino city, the black inner-city neighborhood undergoes enormous transformations and becomes racially “lighter” and more expensive by the year.

Place Not Race

Author: Sheryll Cashin
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807086150
Size: 72.12 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 524
Download and Read
From a nationally recognized expert, a fresh and original argument for bettering affirmative action Race-based affirmative action had been declining as a factor in university admissions even before the recent spate of related cases arrived at the Supreme Court. Since Ward Connerly kickstarted a state-by-state political mobilization against affirmative action in the mid-1990s, the percentage of four-year public colleges that consider racial or ethnic status in admissions has fallen from 60 percent to 35 percent. Only 45 percent of private colleges still explicitly consider race, with elite schools more likely to do so, although they too have retreated. For law professor and civil rights activist Sheryll Cashin, this isn’t entirely bad news, because as she argues, affirmative action as currently practiced does little to help disadvantaged people. The truly disadvantaged—black and brown children trapped in high-poverty environs—are not getting the quality schooling they need in part because backlash and wedge politics undermine any possibility for common-sense public policies. Using place instead of race in diversity programming, she writes, will better amend the structural disadvantages endured by many children of color, while enhancing the possibility that we might one day move past the racial resentment that affirmative action engenders. In Place, Not Race, Cashin reimagines affirmative action and champions place-based policies, arguing that college applicants who have thrived despite exposure to neighborhood or school poverty are deserving of special consideration. Those blessed to have come of age in poverty-free havens are not. Sixty years since the historic decision, we’re undoubtedly far from meeting the promise of Brown v. Board of Education, but Cashin offers a new framework for true inclusion for the millions of children who live separate and unequal lives. Her proposals include making standardized tests optional, replacing merit-based financial aid with need-based financial aid, and recruiting high-achieving students from overlooked places, among other steps that encourage cross-racial alliances and social mobility. A call for action toward the long overdue promise of equality, Place, Not Race persuasively shows how the social costs of racial preferences actually outweigh any of the marginal benefits when effective race-neutral alternatives are available.

The Columbia Guide To African American History Since 1939

Author: Robert L Harris
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023151087X
Size: 42.98 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 460
Download and Read
This book is a multifaceted approach to understanding the central developments in African American history since 1939. It combines a historical overview of key personalities and movements with essays by leading scholars on specific facets of the African American experience, a chronology of events, and a guide to further study. Marian Anderson's famous 1939 concert in front of the Lincoln Memorial was a watershed moment in the struggle for racial justice. Beginning with this event, the editors chart the historical efforts of African Americans to address racism and inequality. They explore the rise of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements and the national and international contexts that shaped their ideologies and methods; consider how changes in immigration patterns have complicated the conventional "black/white" dichotomy in U.S. society; discuss the often uneasy coexistence between a growing African American middle class and a persistent and sizable underclass; and address the complexity of the contemporary African American experience. Contributors consider specific issues in African American life, including the effects of the postindustrial economy and the influence of music, military service, sports, literature, culture, business, and the politics of self-designation, e.g.,"Colored" vs. "Negro," "Black" vs. "African American". While emphasizing political and social developments, this volume also illuminates important economic, military, and cultural themes. An invaluable resource, The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939 provides a thorough understanding of a crucial historical period.