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The Fall Of The House Of Labor

Author: David Montgomery
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521379823
Size: 64.43 MB
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Traces the labor movement from the end of the Civil War to the 1920s, and looks at the relationships between workers of different ethnic backgrounds

The Fall Of The House Of Labor

Author: David Montgomery
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139935615
Size: 80.96 MB
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This book studies the changing ways in which American industrial workers mobilised concerted action in their own interests between the abolition of slavery and the end of open immigration from Europe and Asia. Sustained class conflict between 1916 and 1922 reshaped governmental and business policies, but left labour largely unorganised and in retreat. The House of Labor, so arduously erected by working-class activists during the preceeding generation, did not collapse, but ossified, so that when labour activism was reinvigorated after 1933, the movement split in two. These developments are analysed here in ways which stress the links between migration, neighbourhood life, racial subjugation, business reform, the state, and the daily experience of work itself.

Duquesne And The Rise Of Steel Unionism

Author: James Douglas Rose
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252026607
Size: 27.18 MB
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Not all workers' needs were served by the union. Focusing on the steel works at Duquesne, Pennsylvania, a linchpin of the old Carnegie Steel Company empire and then of U.S. Steel, James D. Rose demonstrates the pivotal role played by a nonunion form of employee representation usually dismissed as a flimsy front for management interests.The early New Deal set in motion two versions of workplace representation that battled for supremacy: company-sponsored employee representation plans (ERPs) and independent trade unionism. At Duquesne, the cause of the unskilled, hourly workers, mostly eastern and southern Europeans as well as blacks, was taken up by the union -- the Fort Dukane Lodge of the Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel, and Tin Workers. For skilled tonnage workers and skilled tradesmen, mainly U.S.-born and of northern and western European extraction, ERPs offered a better solution.Initially little more than a crude antiunion device, ERPs matured from tools of the company into semi-independent, worker-led organizations. Isolated from the union movement through the mid-1930s, ERP representatives and management nonetheless created a sophisticated bargaining structure that represented the shop-floor interests of the mill's skilled workforce. Meanwhile, the Amalgamated gave way to the Steel Workers Organizing Committee, a professionalized and tightly organized affiliate of John L. Lewis's CIO, that expended huge resources trying to gain companywide unionization. Even when the SWOC secured a collective bargaining agreement with U.S. Steel in 1937, however, the Union was still unable to sign up a majority of the workforce at Duquesne.A sophisticated study of the forces that shaped and responded to workers' interests, Duquesne and the Rise of Steel Unionism confirms that what people did on the shop floor was as critical to the course of steel unionism as were corporate decision making and shifts in government policy.

Encyclopedia Of U S Labor And Working Class History

Author: Eric Arnesen
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 0415968267
Size: 57.72 MB
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Providing sweeping coverage of U.S. labor history, this resource contains over 650 entries, encompassing labor history from the colonial era to the present. Written as an objective social history, the "Encyclopedia" encapsulates the rise and decline, and continuous change of U.S. labor history into the 21st century.

Law And The Shaping Of The American Labor Movement

Author: William E. FORBATH
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674037081
Size: 77.79 MB
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In a richly detailed survey of labor law and labor history, Forbath challenges the notion of American "individualism." He shows that, over time, struggles with the courts and the legal order were crucial in reshaping labor's outlook, driving the labor movement to temper its radical goals.

Beyond Equality

Author: David Montgomery
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252008696
Size: 37.18 MB
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Black Americans And Organized Labor

Author: Paul D. Moreno
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807148822
Size: 35.71 MB
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In Black Americans and Organized Labor, Paul D. Moreno offers a bold reinterpretation of the role of race and racial discrimination in the American labor movement. Moreno applies insights of the law-and-economics movement to formulate a powerfully compelling labor-race theorem of elegant simplicity: White unionists found that race was a convenient basis on which to do what unions do -- control the labor supply. Not racism pure and simple but "the economics of discrimination" explains historic black absence and under-representation in unions. Moreno's sweeping reexamination stretches from the antebellum period to the present, integrating principal figures such as Frederick Douglass and Samuel Gompers, Isaac Myers and Booker T. Washington, and W. E. B. Du Bois and A. Philip Randolph. He traces changing attitudes and practices during the simultaneous black migration to the North and consolidation of organized labor's power, through the confusing and conflicted post-World War II period, during the course of the civil rights movement, and into the era of affirmative action. Maneuvering across a wide span of time and a broad array of issues, Moreno brings remarkable clarity to the question of the importance of race in unions. He impressively weaves together labor, policy, and African American history into a cogent, persuasive revisionist study that cannot be ignored.

Wal Mart

Author: Nelson Lichtenstein
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595587462
Size: 52.47 MB
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Edited by one of the nation’s preeminent labor historians, this book marks an ambitious effort to dissect the full extent of Wal-Mart’s business operations, its social effects, and its role in the U.S. and world economy. Wal-Mart is based on a spring 2004 conference of leading historians, business analysts, sociologists, and labor leaders that immediately attracted the attention of the national media, drawing profiles in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and the New York Review of Books. Their contributions are adapted here for a general audience. At the end of the nineteenth century the Pennsylvania Railroad declared itself “the standard of the world.” In more recent years, IBM and then Microsoft seemed the template for a new, global information economy. But at the dawn of the twenty-first century, Wal-Mart has overtaken all rivals as the world-transforming economic institution of our time. Presented in an accessible format and extensively illustrated with charts and graphs, Wal-Mart examines such topics as the giant retailer’s managerial culture, revolutionary use of technological innovation, and controversial pay and promotional practices to provide the most complete guide yet available to America’s largest company.