Download the fiery trial abraham lincoln and american slavery in pdf or read the fiery trial abraham lincoln and american slavery in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get the fiery trial abraham lincoln and american slavery in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



The Fiery Trial Abraham Lincoln And American Slavery

Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393080827
Size: 58.73 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 4821
Download and Read
“A masterwork [by] the preeminent historian of the Civil War era.”—Boston Globe Selected as a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times Book Review, this landmark work gives us a definitive account of Lincoln's lifelong engagement with the nation's critical issue: American slavery. A master historian, Eric Foner draws Lincoln and the broader history of the period into perfect balance. We see Lincoln, a pragmatic politician grounded in principle, deftly navigating the dynamic politics of antislavery, secession, and civil war. Lincoln's greatness emerges from his capacity for moral and political growth.

The Fiery Trial Abraham Lincoln And American Slavery

Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 039334066X
Size: 69.82 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 2831
Download and Read
In a landmark work of deep scholarship and insight, Foner gives us a life of Lincoln as it intertwined with slavery, the defining issue of the time and the tragic hallmark of American history. The author demonstrates how Lincoln navigated a dynamic political landscape deftly, moving in measured steps, often on a path forged by abolitionists and radicals in his party, and that Lincoln's greatness lay in his capacity for moral and political growth.

The Fiery Trial Abraham Lincoln And American Slavery

Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: W. W. Norton
ISBN: 9780393066180
Size: 64.92 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5492
Download and Read
Winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in History, the Bancroft Prize, and the Lincoln Prize: from a master historian, the story of Lincoln's—and the nation's—transformation through the crucible of slavery and emancipation. In this landmark work of deep scholarship and insight, Eric Foner gives us the definitive history of Lincoln and the end of slavery in America. Foner begins with Lincoln's youth in Indiana and Illinois and follows the trajectory of his career across an increasingly tense and shifting political terrain from Illinois to Washington, D.C. Although “naturally anti-slavery” for as long as he can remember, Lincoln scrupulously holds to the position that the Constitution protects the institution in the original slave states. But the political landscape is transformed in 1854 when the Kansas-Nebraska Act makes the expansion of slavery a national issue. A man of considered words and deliberate actions, Lincoln navigates the dynamic politics deftly, taking measured steps, often along a path forged by abolitionists and radicals in his party. Lincoln rises to leadership in the new Republican Party by calibrating his politics to the broadest possible antislavery coalition. As president of a divided nation and commander in chief at war, displaying a similar compound of pragmatism and principle, Lincoln finally embraces what he calls the Civil War's “fundamental and astounding” result: the immediate, uncompensated abolition of slavery and recognition of blacks as American citizens. Foner's Lincoln emerges as a leader, one whose greatness lies in his capacity for moral and political growth through real engagement with allies and critics alike. This powerful work will transform our understanding of the nation's greatest president and the issue that mattered most.

This Fiery Trial

Author: Abraham Lincoln
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195151015
Size: 56.88 MB
Format: PDF
View: 4690
Download and Read
A revealing collection of Abraham Lincoln's best writings includes the Gettysburg Address, the Second Inaugural Address, and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Free Soil Free Labor Free Men

Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199762262
Size: 19.46 MB
Format: PDF
View: 615
Download and Read
Since its publication twenty-five years ago, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men has been recognized as a classic, an indispensable contribution to our understanding of the causes of the American Civil War. A key work in establishing political ideology as a major concern of modern American historians, it remains the only full-scale evaluation of the ideas of the early Republican party. Now with a new introduction, Eric Foner puts his argument into the context of contemporary scholarship, reassessing the concept of free labor in the light of the last twenty-five years of writing on such issues as work, gender, economic change, and political thought. A significant reevaluation of the causes of the Civil War, Foner's study looks beyond the North's opposition to slavery and its emphasis upon preserving the Union to determine the broader grounds of its willingness to undertake a war against the South in 1861. Its search is for those social concepts the North accepted as vital to its way of life, finding these concepts most clearly expressed in the ideology of the growing Republican party in the decade before the war's start. Through a careful analysis of the attitudes of leading factions in the party's formation (northern Whigs, former Democrats, and political abolitionists) Foner is able to show what each contributed to Republican ideology. He also shows how northern ideas of human rights--in particular a man's right to work where and how he wanted, and to accumulate property in his own name--and the goals of American society were implicit in that ideology. This was the ideology that permeated the North in the period directly before the Civil War, led to the election of Abraham Lincoln, and led, almost immediately, to the Civil War itself. At the heart of the controversy over the extension of slavery, he argues, is the issue of whether the northern or southern form of society would take root in the West, whose development would determine the nation's destiny. In his new introductory essay, Foner presents a greatly altered view of the subject. Only entrepreneurs and farmers were actually "free men" in the sense used in the ideology of the period. Actually, by the time the Civil War was initiated, half the workers in the North were wage-earners, not independent workers. And this did not account for women and blacks, who had little freedom in choosing what work they did. He goes onto show that even after the Civil War these guarantees for "free soil, free labor, free men" did not really apply for most Americans, and especially not for blacks. Demonstrating the profoundly successful fusion of value and interest within Republican ideology prior to the Civil War, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men remains a classic of modern American historical writing. Eloquent and influential, it shows how this ideology provided the moral consensus which allowed the North, for the first time in history, to mobilize an entire society in modern warfare.

Gateway To Freedom The Hidden History Of The Underground Railroad

Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393244385
Size: 28.48 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 7719
Download and Read
The dramatic story of fugitive slaves and the antislavery activists who defied the law to help them reach freedom. More than any other scholar, Eric Foner has influenced our understanding of America's history. Now, making brilliant use of extraordinary evidence, the Pulitzer Prize–winning historian once again reconfigures the national saga of American slavery and freedom. A deeply entrenched institution, slavery lived on legally and commercially even in the northern states that had abolished it after the American Revolution. Slaves could be found in the streets of New York well after abolition, traveling with owners doing business with the city's major banks, merchants, and manufacturers. New York was also home to the North’s largest free black community, making it a magnet for fugitive slaves seeking refuge. Slave catchers and gangs of kidnappers roamed the city, seizing free blacks, often children, and sending them south to slavery. To protect fugitives and fight kidnappings, the city's free blacks worked with white abolitionists to organize the New York Vigilance Committee in 1835. In the 1840s vigilance committees proliferated throughout the North and began collaborating to dispatch fugitive slaves from the upper South, Washington, and Baltimore, through Philadelphia and New York, to Albany, Syracuse, and Canada. These networks of antislavery resistance, centered on New York City, became known as the underground railroad. Forced to operate in secrecy by hostile laws, courts, and politicians, the city’s underground-railroad agents helped more than 3,000 fugitive slaves reach freedom between 1830 and 1860. Until now, their stories have remained largely unknown, their significance little understood. Building on fresh evidence—including a detailed record of slave escapes secretly kept by Sydney Howard Gay, one of the key organizers in New York—Foner elevates the underground railroad from folklore to sweeping history. The story is inspiring—full of memorable characters making their first appearance on the historical stage—and significant—the controversy over fugitive slaves inflamed the sectional crisis of the 1850s. It eventually took a civil war to destroy American slavery, but here at last is the story of the courageous effort to fight slavery by "practical abolition," person by person, family by family.

Abraham Lincoln And Horace Greeley

Author: Gregory A. Borchard
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809330458
Size: 54.82 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 6618
Download and Read
Explores the complex dynamic between the 16th President and the editor of the New York Tribune, offering insight into their mutual belief in Henry Clay's "American System" and similarities as self-made men as well as the political disparities that marked their otherwise working relationship.

Our Lincoln

Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated
ISBN: 9780393337051
Size: 19.37 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 7098
Download and Read
A volume of original essays on the sixteenth president includes James M. McPherson's evaluation of his politics and wartime strategies, Sean Wilentz's perspectives on Lincoln's party politics, and Eric Foner's assessment of his views on slavery and race. 15,000 first printing.

Slavery S Ghost

Author: Walter Johnson
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421403331
Size: 17.52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 4259
Download and Read
Written by three prominent historians of the period, Slavery’s Ghost forces readers to think critically about the way we study the past, the depth of racial prejudice, and how African Americans won and lost their freedom in nineteenth-century America.