Download the fire ant wars nature science and public policy in twentieth century america in pdf or read the fire ant wars nature science and public policy in twentieth century america in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get the fire ant wars nature science and public policy in twentieth century america in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



The Fire Ant Wars

Author: Joshua Blu Buhs
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226079820
Size: 43.54 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 6726
Download and Read
Recounts the unsuccessful attempt by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to eliminate invasive South American fire ants from the American South in the years following World War II with a pesticide campaign that left a wake of dead wildlife, sickened cattle, and public protest, in a study that examines twentieth-century American concepts of nature and environmental stewardship.

Six Legs Better

Author: Charlotte Sleigh
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801884450
Size: 52.52 MB
Format: PDF
View: 7036
Download and Read
Sleigh uses specific representations of ants within the field of entomology from the late nineteenth to mid twentieth centuries to explore the broader role of metaphors in science and their often unpredictable translations.

The Big Ratchet

Author: Ruth DeFries
Publisher:
ISBN: 0465044972
Size: 41.99 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 5436
Download and Read
"Our species' pervasive presence on the planet is the combined result of two powerful forces: earth's rich natural endowments and humanity's ability to manipulate nature. From our ability to control fire to our expertise in breeding palatable plants, from our capacity to ship fertilizer across the Atlantic to our skill in selectively tinkering with plant genomes, DeFries describes the ingenious manipulations of nature that have enabled humankind to nourish and flourish. Throughout history humans have been able to ratchet up populations, survive the hatchets that threaten the species, and pivot to a new strategy for survival"--

Fire Ants

Author: Stephen Welton Taber
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781603447119
Size: 14.64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5385
Download and Read
In the early years of the twentieth century, South American fire ants crossed the Caribbean and invaded the shores of the southeastern United States. These imported fire ants quickly found a niche in Gulf Coast fields and lawns, overpowered the native species, and began spreading. In the process they became a notorious pest to some, a beneficial ally to others, and a potential killer to allergy sufferers. As a result, they are among the most intensely studied insects in the world. Near the turn of the millennium the dominant species, the red imported fire ant, finally made its long-feared leap across the hostile western desert into the greener oasis of southern California, where it stood poised to infest the richest agricultural region in the country.In this authoritative book, five economically important species take center stage. These are the red imported fire ant, the black imported fire ant, the tropical fire ant, the southern fire ant, and the golden fire ant. A general introduction and a history of their invasion of North America open the door to additional chapters on natural history, origin and evolution, animals that share the fire ants' nest, the mixed successes of chemical control, and natural enemies and the hopes for biocontrol. Also examined are the pros and cons of fire ants, their medical importance, and suggestions for future research. The appendices list all known fire ant species and explain how to prepare, preserve, and identify every known species occurring in the United States.Well written and enhanced by an extensive glossary, a thorough bibliography of scientific literature, and more than one hundred photos, maps, and drawings, Fire Ants engages and informs both nonprofessionals and specialists.

Toxic Archipelago

Author: Brett L. Walker
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295803010
Size: 32.65 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 1769
Download and Read
Every person on the planet is entangled in a web of ecological relationships that link farms and factories with human consumers. Our lives depend on these relationships -- and are imperiled by them as well. Nowhere is this truer than on the Japanese archipelago. During the nineteenth century, Japan saw the rise of Homo sapiens industrialis, a new breed of human transformed by an engineered, industrialized, and poisonous environment. Toxins moved freely from mines, factory sites, and rice paddies into human bodies. Toxic Archipelago explores how toxic pollution works its way into porous human bodies and brings unimaginable pain to some of them. Brett Walker examines startling case studies of industrial toxins that know no boundaries: deaths from insecticide contaminations; poisonings from copper, zinc, and lead mining; congenital deformities from methylmercury factory effluents; and lung diseases from sulfur dioxide and asbestos. This powerful, probing book demonstrates how the Japanese archipelago has become industrialized over the last two hundred years -- and how people and the environment have suffered as a consequence.

The Oxford Handbook Of Environmental History

Author: Andrew C. Isenberg
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199394474
Size: 62.59 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 5419
Download and Read
The field of environmental history emerged just decades ago but has established itself as one of the most innovative and important new approaches to history, one that bridges the human and natural world, the humanities and the sciences. With the current trend towards internationalizing history, environmental history is perhaps the quintessential approach to studying subjects outside the nation-state model, with pollution, global warming, and other issues affecting the earth not stopping at national borders. With 25 essays, this Handbook is global in scope and innovative in organization, looking at the field thematically through such categories as climate, disease, oceans, the body, energy, consumerism, and international relations.

Evolution Made To Order

Author: Helen Anne Curry
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022639011X
Size: 11.20 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 2139
Download and Read
In the mid-twentieth century, American plant breeders, frustrated by their dependence on natural variation in creating new crops and flowers, eagerly sought technologies that could extend human control over nature. Their search led them to celebrate a series of strange tools: an x-ray beam directed at dormant seeds, a drop of chromosome-altering colchicine on a flower bud, and a piece of radioactive cobalt in a field of growing crops. According to scientific and popular reports of the time, these mutation-inducing methods would generate variation on demand, in turn allowing breeders to genetically engineer crops and flowers to order. Creating a new crop or flower would soon be as straightforward as innovating any other modern industrial product. In Evolution Made to Order, Helen Anne Curry traces the history of America’s pursuit of tools that could speed up evolution. It is an immersive journey through the scientific and social worlds of midcentury genetics and plant breeding and a compelling exploration of American cultures of innovation. As Curry reveals, the creation of genetic technologies was deeply entangled with other areas of technological innovation—from electromechanical to chemical to nuclear. An important study of biological research and innovation in America, Evolution Made to Order provides vital historical context for current worldwide ethical and policy debates over genetic engineering.