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The Free State Of Jones

Author: Victoria E. Bynum
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807854679
Size: 53.34 MB
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Across a century, Victoria Bynum reinterprets the cultural, social, and political meaning of Mississippi's longest civil war, waged in the Free State of Jones, the southeastern Mississippi county that was home to a Unionist stronghold during the Civil War and home to a large and complex mixed-race community in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

The Free State Of Jones Movie Edition

Author: Victoria E. Bynum
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 146962706X
Size: 79.40 MB
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Between late 1863 and mid-1864, an armed band of Confederate deserters battled Confederate cavalry in the Piney Woods region of Jones County, Mississippi. Calling themselves the Knight Company after their captain, Newton Knight, they set up headquarters in the swamps of the Leaf River, where they declared their loyalty to the U.S. government. The story of the Jones County rebellion is well known among Mississippians, and debate over whether the county actually seceded from the state during the war has smoldered for more than a century. Adding further controversy to the legend is the story of Newt Knight's interracial romance with his wartime accomplice, Rachel, a slave. From their relationship there developed a mixed-race community that endured long after the Civil War had ended, and the ambiguous racial identity of their descendants confounded the rules of segregated Mississippi well into the twentieth century. Victoria Bynum traces the origins and legacy of the Jones County uprising from the American Revolution to the modern civil rights movement. In bridging the gap between the legendary and the real Free State of Jones, she shows how the legend--what was told, what was embellished, and what was left out--reveals a great deal about the South's transition from slavery to segregation; the racial, gender, and class politics of the period; and the contingent nature of history and memory. In a new afterword, Bynum updates readers on recent scholarship, current issues of race and Southern heritage, and the coming movie that make this Civil War story essential reading. The Free State of Jones film, starring Matthew McConaughey, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, and Keri Russell, will be released in May 2016.

The State Of Jones

Author: Sally Jenkins
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 0385530323
Size: 74.28 MB
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New York Times bestselling author Sally Jenkins and distinguished Harvard professor John Stauffer mine a nearly forgotten piece of Civil War history and strike gold in this surprising account of the only Southern county to secede from the Confederacy. The State of Jones is a true story about the South during the Civil War—the real South. Not the South that has been mythologized in novels and movies, but an authentic, hardscrabble place where poor men were forced to fight a rich man’s war for slavery and cotton. In Jones County, Mississippi, a farmer named Newton Knight led his neighbors, white and black alike, in an insurrection against the Confederacy at the height of the Civil War. Knight’s life story mirrors the little-known story of class struggle in the South—and it shatters the image of the Confederacy as a unified front against the Union. This riveting investigative account takes us inside the battle of Corinth, where thousands lost their lives over less than a quarter mile of land, and to the dreadful siege of Vicksburg, presenting a gritty picture of a war in which generals sacrificed thousands through their arrogance and ignorance. Off the battlefield, the Newton Knight story is rich in drama as well. He was a man with two loves: his wife, who was forced to flee her home simply to survive, and an ex-slave named Rachel, who, in effect, became his second wife. It was Rachel who cared for Knight during the war when he was hunted by the Confederates, and, later, when members of the Knight clan sought revenge for the disgrace he had brought upon the family name. Working hand in hand with John Stauffer, distinguished chair and professor of the History of American Civilization at Harvard University, Sally Jenkins has made the leap from preeminent sportswriter to a historical writer endowed with the accuracy, drive, and passion of Doris Kearns Goodwin. The result is Civil War history at its finest. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Unruly Women

Author: Victoria E. Bynum
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469616998
Size: 77.39 MB
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In this richly detailed and imaginatively researched study, Victoria Bynum investigates "unruly" women in central North Carolina before and during the Civil War. Analyzing the complex and interrelated impact of gender, race, class, and region on the lives of black and white women, she shows how their diverse experiences and behavior reflected and influenced the changing social order and political economy of the state and region. Her work expands our knowledge of black and white women by studying them outside the plantation setting. Bynum searched local and state court records, public documents, and manuscript collections to locate and document the lives of these otherwise ordinary, obscure women. Some appeared in court as abused, sometimes abusive, wives, as victims and sometimes perpetrators of violent assaults, or as participants in ilicit, interracial relationships. During the Civil War, women freqently were cited for theft, trespassing, or rioting, usually in an effort to gain goods made scarce by war. Some women were charged with harboring evaders or deserters of the Confederacy, an act that reflected their conviction that the Confederacy was destroying them. These politically powerless unruly women threatened to disrupt the underlying social structure of the Old South, which depended on the services and cooperation of all women. Bynum examines the effects of women's social and sexual behavior on the dominant society and shows the ways in which power flowed between private and public spheres. Whether wives or unmarried, enslaved or free, women were active agents of the society's ordering and dissolution.

Bitterly Divided

Author: David Williams
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595585958
Size: 63.62 MB
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A fascinating look at a hidden side of the South’s history

Mississippi Women

Author: Martha H. Swain
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 082033393X
Size: 32.63 MB
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Some of the women are well known, others were prominent in their time but have since faded into obscurity, and a few have never received the attention they deserve."--BOOK JACKET.

Rebels Against Confederate Mississippi

Author: Victoria E. Bynum
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9780807838501
Size: 51.19 MB
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Between late 1863 and mid-1864, an armed band of Confederate deserters battled Confederate cavalry in the Piney Woods region of Jones County, Mississippi. Calling themselves the Knight Company after their captain, Newton Knight, and aided by women, slaves, and children who spied on the Confederacy and provided food and shelter, they set up headquarters in the swamps of the Leaf River. There, legend has it, they declared the Free State of Jones. In this UNC Press Short, excerpted from The Free State of Jones: Mississippi's Longest Civil War, Victoria E. Bynum traces Newton Knight's story from his enlistment in the Confederate Army, to his desertion and formation of the Knight Company, to the violent clashes with Confederate authorities that culminated in the infamous Lowry raids of 1864. UNC Press Civil War Shorts excerpt compelling, shorter narratives from selected best-selling books published by the University of North Carolina Press and present them as engaging, quick reads. Produced exclusively in ebook format, these shorts present essential concepts, defining moments, and concise introductions to topics. They are intended to stir the imagination and encourage further exploration of the original publications from which these works are drawn.

The Free State Of Jones And The Echo Of The Black Horn

Author: Thomas Jefferson Knight
Publisher: Racehorse Publishing
ISBN: 9781944686956
Size: 25.76 MB
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"The life and activities of Captain Newton Knight originally published in 1935; The echo of the Black Horn originally published in 1951 by Parthenon Press."--Title page verso.

Justice Older Than The Law

Author: Katie McCabe
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 9781604737745
Size: 63.41 MB
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From the streets of Charlotte, North Carolina, to the segregated courtrooms of the nation's capital, from the white male bastion of the World War II Army to the male stronghold of Howard University Law School, from the pulpits of churches where women had waited years for the right to minister--in all these places Dovey Johnson Roundtree (b. 1914) sought justice. Though she is a legendary African American figure in the legal community of Washington, D.C., she remains largely unknown to the American public. "Justice Older than the Law" is her story, the product of a remarkable, ten-year collaboration with National Magazine Award-winner Katie McCabe. As a protege of Mary McLeod Bethune, Roundtree became one of the first women to break the gender and color barriers in the United States military. Inspired by Thurgood Marshall and James Madison Nabrit, Jr., Roundtree went on to make history by winning a 1955 bus desegregation case, "Sarah Keys v. Carolina Coach Company." That decision demolished "separate but equal" in the realm of interstate transportation and enabled Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to combat southern resistance to the Freedom Riders' campaign in 1961. At a time when black attorneys had to leave the courthouses to use the bathrooms, Roundtree took on Washington's white legal establishment and prevailed. She led the vanguard of women ordained to the ministry in the African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1961 and merged her law practice with her ministry to fight for families and children being destroyed by urban violence. Hers is a vision of biblical and social justice older by far than the law, and her life story speaks movingly and urgently to our racially troubled times."

Tap Roots

Author: James H. Street
Publisher: eNet Press
ISBN: 1618864572
Size: 12.82 MB
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In the second novel of the Dabney family saga, Sam'l Dabney is no longer "ol' man Dabney's brat" but has become a rich and successful aristocrat of such great influence that some call him the Father of Mississippi and Alabama. Old and dying, he and Tishomingo, a prince of the Choctaws, are all who are left of the group who fled the Promised Land. After Sam's death, the Dabney family, strong, greedy, and imbued with raw courage, jeers at fate and dares the impossible. They secede from Mississippi, organize an independent republic called the Free State of Lebanon, and wage a no-quarter war against the might and millions of the Confederacy at a time when the Union seemed doomed. Some die in battle, others on the gallows, and only a few live to see the tiny spark they kindled blaze into a fire for freedom. The family is led by Sam's son, Hoab, a shouting abolitionist and religious zealot, whose secret is still carefully guarded and, if ever revealed, may rock the South. He and wife, Shellie, and their children — Cormac, red-headed Morna, in spirit much like her great-aunt, Honoria, and the twins Aven and Bruce continue Sam's legacy — the tap root that pushed through the loam and into the red clay bed of the valley and from which the Dabney legacy continues to flourish. They are joined by others — neighbor Claiborne MacIvor, who loved two Dabney women; Keith Alexander, the morose and unbelievably handsome Black Knight of Vengeance; and Reverend Kirkland, the pudgy little preacher who told a great denomination, "I'll see you in hell before I surrender my rights. I am but a feeble ripple, but behind me comes the whirlwind." Tap Roots begins in 1858 and moves to a thunderous climax in 1865. The book is based on the true story of the "free state of Jones" in which the farmers and workmen of Jones County in Mississippi decide to succeed from both the United States and the Confederacy. In this part of the South there were few if any plantations, most people worked their own farms and held no slaves and they strongly resented being required "to fight a rich man's war". The majority of settlers were also of Scots-Irish decent and did not believe in slavery, so they decided to form a Republic of free men. Tap Roots was a best seller and later made into a film starring Susan Hayward.