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The Good Immigrants

Author: Madeline Y. Hsu
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691176213
Size: 17.31 MB
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Conventionally, US immigration history has been understood through the lens of restriction and those who have been barred from getting in. In contrast, The Good Immigrants considers immigration from the perspective of Chinese elites—intellectuals, businessmen, and students—who gained entrance because of immigration exemptions. Exploring a century of Chinese migrations, Madeline Hsu looks at how the model minority characteristics of many Asian Americans resulted from US policies that screened for those with the highest credentials in the most employable fields, enhancing American economic competitiveness. The earliest US immigration restrictions targeted Chinese people but exempted students as well as individuals who might extend America's influence in China. Western-educated Chinese such as Madame Chiang Kai-shek became symbols of the US impact on China, even as they patriotically advocated for China's modernization. World War II and the rise of communism transformed Chinese students abroad into refugees, and the Cold War magnified the importance of their talent and training. As a result, Congress legislated piecemeal legal measures to enable Chinese of good standing with professional skills to become citizens. Pressures mounted to reform American discriminatory immigration laws, culminating with the 1965 Immigration Act. Filled with narratives featuring such renowned Chinese immigrants as I. M. Pei, The Good Immigrants examines the shifts in immigration laws and perceptions of cultural traits that enabled Asians to remain in the United States as exemplary, productive Americans.

Asian American History A Very Short Introduction

Author: Madeline Y. Hsu
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190219769
Size: 30.98 MB
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A 2012 survey by the Pew Research Center reported that Asian Americans are the best-educated, highest-income, and best-assimilated racial group in the United States. Before reaching this level of economic success and social assimilation, however, Asian immigrants' path was full of difficult, even demeaning, moments. This book provides a sweeping and nuanced history of Asian Americans, revealing how and why the perception of Asian immigrants changed over time. Asian migrants, in large part Chinese, arrived in significant numbers on the West Coast during the 1850s and 1860s to work in gold mining and on the construction of the transcontinental Railroad. Unlike their contemporary European counterparts, Asians, often stigmatized as "coolies," challenged American ideals of equality with the problem of whether all racial groups could be integrated into America's democracy. The fear of the "Yellow Peril" soon spurred an array of legislative and institutional efforts to segregate them through immigration laws, restrictions on citizenship, and limits on employment, property ownership, access to public services, and civil rights. Prejudices against Asian Americans reached a peak during World War II, when Japanese Americans were interned en masse. It was only with changes in the immigration laws and the social and political activism of the 1960s and 1970s that Asian Americans gained ground and acceptance, albeit in the still stereotyped category of "model minorities." Madeline Y. Hsu weaves a fascinating historical narrative of this "American Dream." She shows how Asian American success, often attributed to innate cultural values, is more a result of the immigration laws, which have largely pre-selected immigrants of high economic and social potential. Asian Americans have, in turn, been used by politicians to bludgeon newer (and more populous) immigrant groups for their purported lack of achievement. Hsu deftly reveals how public policy, which can restrict and also selectively promote certain immigrant populations, is a key reason why some immigrant groups appear to be more naturally successful and why the identity of those groups evolves differently from others.

The Oxford Handbook Of American Immigration And Ethnicity

Author: Ronald H. Bayor
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190626186
Size: 47.41 MB
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Scholarship on immigration to America is a coin with two sides: it asks both how America changed immigrants, and how they changed America. Were the immigrants uprooted from their ancestral homes, leaving everything behind, or were they transplanted, bringing many aspects of their culture with them? Although historians agree with the transplantation concept, the notion of the melting pot, which suggests a complete loss of the immigrant culture, persists in the public mind. The Oxford Handbook of American Immigration and Ethnicity bridges this gap and offers a comprehensive and nuanced survey of American racial and ethnic development, assessing the current status of historical research and simultaneously setting the goals for future investigation. Early immigration historians focused on the European migration model, and the ethnic appeal of politicians such as Fiorello La Guardia and James Michael Curley in cities with strong ethno-political histories like New York and Boston. But the story of American ethnicity goes far beyond Ellis Island. Only after the 1965 Immigration Act and the increasing influx of non-Caucasian immigrants, scholars turned more fully to the study of African, Asian and Latino migrants to America. This Handbook brings together thirty eminent scholars to describe the themes, methodologies, and trends that characterize the history and current debates on American immigration. The Handbook's trenchant chapters provide compelling analyses of cutting-edge issues including identity, whiteness, borders and undocumented migration, immigration legislation, intermarriage, assimilation, bilingualism, new American religions, ethnicity-related crime, and pan-ethnic trends. They also explore the myth of "model minorities" and the contemporary resurgence of anti-immigrant feelings. A unique contribution to the field of immigration studies, this volume considers the full racial and ethnic unfolding of the United States in its historical context.

Alle Menschen Sind Gleich Erfolgreiche Nicht

Author: Amy Chua
Publisher: Campus Verlag
ISBN: 3593501171
Size: 35.34 MB
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Warum sind Einwanderer aus China und dem Iran Gewinnertypen und die aus anderen Nationen oft nicht? »Tigermutter« Amy Chua und ihr Mann Jed Rubenfeld haben eine überraschende Antwort. Erfolg hat, wer drei Dinge mit auf den Weg bekommt: das Gefühl kollektiver Überlegenheit, gepaart mit einer tiefen Unsicherheit gegenüber der neuen Gesellschaft und nicht zuletzt einer guten Portion Selbstdisziplin. Das Gute: Das Erfolgsprinzip ist kulturell geprägt, aber dennoch übertragbar und kann uns auch hierzulande eine Lehre sein. Vorausgesetzt, wir haben den nötigen Biss!

Das Geheimnis Des Dr Fu Manchu

Author: Sax Rohmer
Publisher: BookRix
ISBN: 3743843374
Size: 59.32 MB
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Zum ersten Mal erfährt der Arzt Petrie von dem mysteriösen Dr. Fu-Manchu, als ihn sein Freund Nayland Smith eines Abends unerwartet aufsucht und sofort die Fenster verdunkelt. "Du wirst rasch begreifen, dass ich allen Grund habe, vorsichtig zu sein", erklärt dieser sein seltsames Verhalten.Dann begeben sich beide zu einem schicksalhaften Treffen im nächtlichen London: Doch der Mann, zu dessen Rettung sie geeilt waren, ist bereits tot, und irgendjemand – oder irgendetwas – verfolgt sie auf dem Heimweg.So beginnt der mörderische Kampf mit Dr. Fu-Manchu, einem Chinesen von verbrecherischer Genialität. Zusammen mit seiner verführerischen Komplizin will er die westliche Welt durch unvorstellbare orientalische Schrecken ins Chaos stürzen und die Herrschaft über den gesamten Erdball an sich reißen...Mit der Figur des Dr. Fu-Manchu schuf der englische Schriftsteller Sax Rohmer eine der bekanntesten und einzigartigsten Verbrecherfiguren der Kriminalliteraur, vergleichbar am ehesten mit Norbert Jacques Dr. Mabuse.In Das Geheimnis des Dr. Fu-Manchu hat der größenwahnsinnige Verbrecher seinen ersten Auftritt – in einem klassischen, internationalen Beststeller, packend wie Edgar Allan Poe, spannend wie Edgar Wallace: Einer der berühmtesten Thriller, die je geschrieben wurden, vom Apex-Verlag in einer durchgesehenen, in Teilen neu übersetzte Neu-Ausgabe veröffentlicht.

Choreographing Asian America

Author: Yutian Wong
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
ISBN: 0819571083
Size: 75.52 MB
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Poised at the intersection of Asian American studies and dance studies, Choreographing Asian America is the first book-length examination of the role of Orientalist discourse in shaping Asian Americanist entanglements with U.S. modern dance history. Moving beyond the acknowledgement that modern dance has its roots in Orientalist appropriation, Yutian Wong considers the effect that invisible Orientalism has on the reception of work by Asian American choreographers and the conceptualization of Asian American performance as a category. Drawing on ethnographic and choreographic research methods, the author follows the work of Club O’ Noodles—a Vietnamese American performance ensemble—to understand how Asian American artists respond to competing narratives of representation, aesthetics, and social activism that often frame the production of Asian American performance.

The Politics Of Asian Americans

Author: Pei-te Lien
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135952302
Size: 54.62 MB
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Through the perspectives of mass politics, this book challenges popular misconceptions about Asian Americans as politically apathetic, disloyal, fragmented, unsophisticated and inscrutable by showcasing results of the 2000-01 Multi City Asian American Political Survey.

America S Asia

Author: Colleen Lye
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400826438
Size: 18.94 MB
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What explains the perception of Asians both as economic exemplars and as threats? America's Asia explores a discursive tradition that affiliates the East with modern efficiency, in contrast to more familiar primitivist forms of Orientalism. Colleen Lye traces the American stereotype of Asians as a "model minority" or a "yellow peril"--two aspects of what she calls "Asiatic racial form"-- to emergent responses to globalization beginning in California in the late nineteenth century, when industrialization proceeded in tandem with the nation's neocolonial expansion beyond its continental frontier. From Progressive efforts to regulate corporate monopoly to New Deal contentions with the crisis of the Great Depression, a particular racial mode of social redress explains why turn-of-the-century radicals and reformers united around Asian exclusion and why Japanese American internment during World War II was a liberal initiative. In Lye's reconstructed archive of Asian American racialization, literary naturalism and its conventions of representing capitalist abstraction provide key historiographical evidence. Arguing for the profound influence of literature on policymaking, America's Asia examines the relationship between Jack London and leading Progressive George Kennan on U.S.-Japan relations, Frank Norris and AFL leader Samuel Gompers on cheap immigrant labor, Pearl S. Buck and journalist Edgar Snow on the Popular Front in China, and John Steinbeck and left intellectual Carey McWilliams on Japanese American internment. Lye's materialist approach to the construction of race succeeds in locating racialization as part of a wider ideological pattern and in distinguishing between its different, and sometimes opposing, historical effects.

The Racial Mundane

Author: Ju Yon Kim
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479821748
Size: 32.25 MB
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Winner, Lois P. Rudnick Book Prize presented by the New England American Studies Association Across the twentieth century, national controversies involving Asian Americans have drawn attention to such seemingly unremarkable activities as eating rice, greeting customers, and studying for exams. While public debates about Asian Americans have invoked quotidian practices to support inconsistent claims about racial difference, diverse aesthetic projects have tested these claims by experimenting with the relationships among habit, body, and identity. In The Racial Mundane, Ju Yon Kim argues that the ambiguous relationship between behavioral tendencies and the body has sustained paradoxical characterizations of Asian Americans as ideal and impossible Americans. The body’s uncertain attachment to its routine motions promises alternately to materialize racial distinctions and to dissolve them. Kim’s study focuses on works of theater, fiction, and film that explore the interface between racialized bodies and everyday enactments to reveal new and latent affiliations. The various modes of performance developed in these works not only encourage audiences to see habitual behaviors differently, but also reveal the stakes of noticing such behaviors at all. Integrating studies of race, performance, and the everyday, The Racial Mundane invites readers to reflect on how and to what effect perfunctory behaviors become objects of public scrutiny.

Asian American Women And Men

Author: Yen Le Espiritu
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780803972551
Size: 67.99 MB
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This groundbreaking volume is among the first to explore the Asian-American experience from a gendered perspective. Yen Le Espiritu documents how the historical and contemporary oppression of Asian-Americans has structured gender relationships among them, and has contributed to the creation of social institutions and systems of meaning.