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The Grimk Sisters From South Carolina

Author: Gerda Lerner
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807868096
Size: 51.43 MB
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A landmark work of women's history originally published in 1967, Gerda Lerner's best-selling biography of Sarah and Angelina Grimke explores the lives and ideas of the only southern women to become antislavery agents in the North and pioneers for women's rights. This revised and expanded edition includes two new primary documents and an additional essay by Lerner. In a revised introduction Lerner reinterprets her own work nearly forty years later and gives new recognition to the major significance of Sarah Grimke's feminist writings.

Die Erfindung Der Fl Gel

Author: Sue Monk Kidd
Publisher: btb Verlag
ISBN: 364115149X
Size: 32.97 MB
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Zwei Frauen, die die Welt verändern Die elfjährige Sarah, wohlbehütete Tochter reicher Gutsbesitzer, erhält in Charleston ein ungewöhnliches Geburtstagsgeschenk – die zehnjährige Hetty »Handful«, die ihr als Dienstmädchen zur Seite stehen soll. Dass Sarah dem schwarzen Mädchen allerdings das Lesen beibringt, hatten ihre Eltern nicht erwartet. Und dass sowohl Sarah als auch Hetty sich befreien wollen aus den Zwängen ihrer Zeit, natürlich auch nicht. Doch Sarah ahnt: Auf sie wartet eine besondere Aufgabe im Leben. Obwohl sie eine Frau ist. Handful ihrerseits sehnt sich nach einem Stück Freiheit. Denn sie weiß aus den märchenhaften Geschichten ihrer Mutter: Einst haben alle Menschen Flügel gehabt ...

Reader S Guide To American History

Author: Peter J. Parish
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134261896
Size: 17.44 MB
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There are so many books on so many aspects of the history of the United States, offering such a wide variety of interpretations, that students, teachers, scholars, and librarians often need help and advice on how to find what they want. The Reader's Guide to American History is designed to meet that need by adopting a new and constructive approach to the appreciation of this rich historiography. Each of the 600 entries on topics in political, social and economic history describes and evaluates some 6 to 12 books on the topic, providing guidance to the reader on everything from broad surveys and interpretive works to specialized monographs. The entries are devoted to events and individuals, as well as broader themes, and are written by a team of well over 200 contributors, all scholars of American history.

The Power Of Woman

Author: Pamela R. Durso
Publisher: Mercer University Press
ISBN: 9780865548763
Size: 58.24 MB
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"Sarah Moore Grimke (1792-1873) wanted to become a "useful member of society," a goal she met through her impressive contributions to American social reform during the 1830s. The issue that loomed largest during that decade was slavery, and Sarah became a spokeswoman for and a leader in the abolition movement. As a Southern gentlewoman, her contributions were unique in that she critiqued the institution based on personal experience." "But Sarah did more than fight for the rights of slaves. Perhaps her greatest contribution was as an advocate of women's rights. Her feminist beliefs are set forth in her Letters on the Equality of the Sexes (1838). In this collection of letters, she implemented a new hermeneutic to interpret biblical verses traditionally considered to subject women to the tyranny of men. She confronted the subjugation of women based on divine authority and rejected patriarchal interpretations of Scripture. Based on her interpretation of Scripture, Sarah advocated full equality for women in education, vocation, politics, and finances. She became a role model for many women who later became leaders in the suffrage movement, and is still a role model for many today. Sarah Moore Grimke confronted racism and prejudice within church, society, and herself." "Most books and articles dealing with the Grimke sisters focus on Angelina, and no biography has been written of Sarah. This is the first book-length treatment of Sarah's life and work, and as such as indispensable reading for those interested in women's studies, racism, suffrage history, and religious history."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Invention Of Wings

Author: Sue Monk Kidd
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698152425
Size: 78.92 MB
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From the celebrated author of The Secret Life of Bees, a #1 New York Times bestselling novel about two unforgettable American women. Writing at the height of her narrative and imaginative gifts, Sue Monk Kidd presents a masterpiece of hope, daring, the quest for freedom, and the desire to have a voice in the world. Hetty “Handful” Grimke, an urban slave in early nineteenth century Charleston, yearns for life beyond the suffocating walls that enclose her within the wealthy Grimke household. The Grimke’s daughter, Sarah, has known from an early age she is meant to do something large in the world, but she is hemmed in by the limits imposed on women. Kidd’s sweeping novel is set in motion on Sarah’s eleventh birthday, when she is given ownership of ten year old Handful, who is to be her handmaid. We follow their remarkable journeys over the next thirty five years, as both strive for a life of their own, dramatically shaping each other’s destinies and forming a complex relationship marked by guilt, defiance, estrangement and the uneasy ways of love. As the stories build to a riveting climax, Handful will endure loss and sorrow, finding courage and a sense of self in the process. Sarah will experience crushed hopes, betrayal, unrequited love, and ostracism before leaving Charleston to find her place alongside her fearless younger sister, Angelina, as one of the early pioneers in the abolition and women’s rights movements. Inspired by the historical figure of Sarah Grimke, Kidd goes beyond the record to flesh out the rich interior lives of all of her characters, both real and invented, including Handful’s cunning mother, Charlotte, who courts danger in her search for something better. This exquisitely written novel is a triumph of storytelling that looks with unswerving eyes at a devastating wound in American history, through women whose struggles for liberation, empowerment, and expression will leave no reader unmoved. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Radical Pacifism In Modern America

Author: Marian Mollin
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812202821
Size: 62.99 MB
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Radical Pacifism in Modern America traces cycles of success and decline in the radical wing of the American peace movement, an egalitarian strain of pacifism that stood at the vanguard of antimilitarist organizing and American radical dissent from 1940 to 1970. Using traditional archival material and oral history sources, Marian Mollin examines how gender and race shaped and limited the political efforts of radical pacifist women and men, highlighting how activists linked pacifism to militant masculinity and privileged the priorities of its predominantly white members. In spite of the invisibility that this framework imposed on activist women, the history of this movement belies accounts that relegate women to the margins of American radicalism and mixed-sex political efforts. Motivated by a strong egalitarianism, radical pacifist women rejected separatist organizing strategies and, instead, worked alongside men at the front lines of the struggle to construct a new paradigm of social and political change. Their compelling examples of female militancy and leadership challenge the essentialist association of female pacifism with motherhood and expand the definition of political action to include women's political work in both the public and private spheres. Focusing on the vexed alliance between white peace activists and black civil rights workers, Mollin similarly details the difficulties that arose at the points where their movements overlapped and challenges the seemingly natural association between peace and civil rights. Emphasizing the actions undertaken by militant activists, Radical Pacifism in Modern America illuminates the complex relationship between gender, race, activism, and political culture, identifying critical factors that simultaneously hindered and facilitated grassroots efforts at social and political change.

The New Encyclopedia Of Southern Culture

Author: Charles Reagan Wilson
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469616556
Size: 46.37 MB
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Providing a chronological and interpretive spine to the twenty-four volumes of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, this volume broadly surveys history in the American South from the Paleoindian period (approximately 8000 B.C.E.) to the present. In 118 essays, contributors cover the turbulent past of the region that has witnessed frequent racial conflict, a bloody Civil War fought and lost on its soil, massive in- and out-migration, major economic transformations, and a civil rights movement that brought fundamental change to the social order. Charles Reagan Wilson's overview essay examines the evolution of southern history and the way our understanding of southern culture has unfolded over time and in response to a variety of events and social forces--not just as the opposite of the North but also in the larger context of the Atlantic World. Longer thematic essays cover major eras and events, such as early settlement, slave culture, Reconstruction, the New Deal, and the rise of the New South. Brief topical entries cover individuals--including figures from the Civil War, the civil rights movement, and twentieth-century politics--and organizations such as the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Daughters of the Confederacy, and Citizens' Councils, among others. Together, these essays offer a sweeping reference to the rich history of the region.

Francis Butler Simkins

Author: James Scott Humphreys
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 64.77 MB
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In this biography, James Humphreys takes a close look at Simkins as a man, to better understand him as a historian. He engages with Simkins' physical and mental eccentricities and explores the extent to which the historian was shaped by the values he learned during his childhood in segregationist South Carolina.

Why The Civil War Came

Author: Gabor S. Boritt
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199879621
Size: 61.49 MB
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In the early morning of April 12, 1861, Captain George S. James ordered the bombardment of Fort Sumter, beginning a war that would last four horrific years and claim a staggering number of lives. Since that fateful day, the debate over the causes of the American Civil War has never ceased. What events were instrumental in bringing it about? How did individuals and institutions function? What did Northerners and Southerners believe in the decades of strife preceding the war? What steps did they take to avoid war? Indeed, was the great armed conflict avoidable at all? Why the Civil War Came brings a talented chorus of voices together to recapture the feel of a very different time and place, helping the reader to grasp more fully the commencement of our bloodiest war. From William W. Freehling's discussion of the peculiarities of North American slavery to Charles Royster's disturbing piece on the combatants' savage readiness to fight, the contributors bring to life the climate of a country on the brink of disaster. Mark Summers, for instance, depicts the tragically jubilant first weeks of Northern recruitment, when Americans on both sides were as yet unaware of the hellish slaughter that awaited them. Glenna Matthews underscores the important war-catalyzing role played by extraordinary public women, who proved that neither side of the Mason-Dixon line was as patriarchal as is thought. David Blight reveals an African-American world that "knew what time it was," and welcomed war. And Gabor Boritt examines the struggle's central figure, Lincoln himself, illuminating in the years leading up to the war a blindness on the future president's part, an unwillingness to confront the looming calamity that was about to smash the nation asunder. William E. Gienapp notes perhaps the most unsettling fact about the Civil War, that democratic institutions could not resolve the slavery issue without resorting to violence on an epic scale. With gripping detail, Why the Civil War Came takes readers back to a country fraught with bitterness, confusion, and hatred--a country ripe for a war of unprecedented bloodshed--to show why democracy failed, and violence reigned.