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The Guarding Of Ireland The Garda S Och Na And The Irish State 1960 2014

Author: Conor Brady
Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd
ISBN: 0717159345
Size: 30.48 MB
Format: PDF
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A very timely analysis of the Garda Síochána, the Irish police force, as it navigates one of the most difficult years since its foundation. It is a story marked by success and failure, by attempted reform and resistance to change, by outstanding individual performance and deplorable lapses in discipline. More than an account of policing and politics, this is the story of the Republic's troubled coming of age. In this excellent history of the Garda Síochána, the Irish police force, Conor Brady, the most authoritative historian of Irish policing, explores its successes, its failures and the biggest challenges it has faced from 1960 to 2014, and looks at the recent spate of crises around the Garda Síochána Ombudsman Commission (GSOC), leading to the resignation of Justice Minister Alan Shatter and Garda Commissioner Martin Callinan, that have rocked the force to its very core. Beginning with one of the Gardaí’s greatest tests – maintaining the security of the Irish State during the Northern crisis and the Troubles – Brady goes on to chronicle the emergence of guns in Irish criminal life and the rapid expansion of the domestic drug trade and related gangland warfare, focussing on the interactions of the Gardaí and major Irish crime kingpins including Martin ‘the General’ Cahill, Gerard ‘the Monk’ Hutch and John Gilligan, alleged killer of Veronica Guerin. Acknowledged as one of the successes of the independent Irish State, the Garda Síochána has not been without its flaws and its failings, and the author does not shy away from exploring these. The Guarding of Ireland comprehensively covers the recent crisis surrounding the alleged bugging of the Garda Síochána Ombudsman Commission (GSOC), privacy concerns in relation to the recording of Garda phone calls, and the penalty points/whistle-blower controversy that led to the resignation of Garda Commissioner Martin Callinan and Justice Minister Alan Shatter. Other fascinating subjects explored are how the supposed operational independence of the organisation has led to clashes with those in political authority, from Charlie Haughey to Desmond O’Malley, the difficulties surrounding structural reform and the author's thesis that there is a distinct correlation between the political health of the State and the way its police discharge their functions. ‘The Guarding of Ireland focuses on Irish policing from 1969, which saw both the publication of the Conroy report and the commencement of the Troubles, up to the current and ongoing scandals that this year have led to the resignation of both a commissioner and a minister for justice … [The Guarding of Ireland] is &hellip as much an analysis of the politics of policing as it is of the policing itself. The Troubles, the modernisation of the force, and the rise in crime, drugs and organised crime are all documented in a style that is detailed but still engaging. Vicky Conway, The Irish Times Weekend Review ‘[The Guarding of Ireland] traces the history of An Garda Síochána from 1960 to the present day. It is a fascinating narrative that should be compulsory reading for anybody associated with the current attempts to reform the force, and how it is governed … For every vignette of personal heroism, like that of Garda [Michael] Reynolds, for every case of dedicated public service from individual members, there are also examples of a culture that leaves much to be desired. What emerges from these pages is that the culture within the force is attributable, to a great extent, to attitudes and oversight from its political masters. In this regard, nothing looms as large as the darkest days of the Troubles. Mick Clifford, Irish Examiner

The Irish Civil War And Society

Author: G. Foster
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137425709
Size: 28.72 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Irish Civil War and Society sheds new light on the social currents shaping the Irish Civil War, from the 'politics of respectability' behind animosities and discourses; to the intersection of social conflicts with political violence; to the social dimensions of the war's messy aftermath.

Policing Twentieth Century Ireland

Author: Vicky Conway
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113508954X
Size: 77.90 MB
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The twentieth century was a time of rapid social change in Ireland: from colonial rule to independence, civil war and later the Troubles; from poverty to globalisation and the Celtic Tiger; and from the rise to the fall of the Catholic Church. Policing in Ireland has been shaped by all of these changes. This book critically evaluates the creation of the new police force, an Garda Síochána, in the 1920s and analyses how this institution was influenced by and responded to these substantial changes. Beginning with an overview of policing in pre-independence Ireland, this book chronologically charts the history of policing in Ireland. It presents data from oral history interviews with retired gardaí who served between the 1950s and 1990s, giving unique insight into the experience of policing Ireland, the first study of its kind in Ireland. Particular attention is paid to the difficulties of transition, the early encounters with the IRA, the policing of the Blueshirts, the world wars, gangs in Dublin and the growth of drugs and crime. Particularly noteworthy is the analysis of policing the Troubles and the immense difficulties that generated. This book is essential reading for those interested in policing or Irish history, but is equally important for those concerned with the legacy of colonialism and transition.

The Civic Guard Mutiny

Author: Brian McCarthy
Publisher: Mercier PressLtd
ISBN: 9781781170458
Size: 15.42 MB
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Explores the reasons behind the mutiny of men responsible for maintaining law and order in the new Irish Free State.

A History Of The Garda S Och Na

Author: Liam McNiffe
Publisher: Irish American Book Company
ISBN:
Size: 40.86 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Published to coincide with the seventy-fifth anniversary of the foundation of the Garda Siochana, this absorbing and in-depth social history traces the beginnings of the Irish police force and tells of the influence of the Royal Irish Constabulary on the early Garda Siochana, the Kildare Mutiny, the decision to have an unarmed police force, the Broy Harriers, as well as its involvement in Irish sport.

A June Of Ordinary Murders

Author: Conor Brady
Publisher: Minotaur Books
ISBN: 1466861266
Size: 78.72 MB
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A thrilling, beautifully written mystery debut that brings Victorian Dublin vividly, passionately to life, drawing readers on a gripping journey of murder and intrigue. In the 1880s the Dublin Metropolitan Police classified crime in two distinct categories. Political crimes were classed as "special," whereas theft, robbery and even murder, no matter how terrible, were known as "ordinary." Dublin, June 1887: The city swelters in a long summer heat wave, the criminal underworld simmers, and with it, the threat of nationalist violence is growing. Meanwhile, the Castle administration hopes the celebration of Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee will pass peacefully. Then, the mutilated bodies of a man and a child are discovered in Phoenix Park and Detective Sergeant Joe Swallow steps up to investigate. Cynical and tired, Swallow is a man living on past successes in need of a win. With the Land War at its height, the priority is to contain special crime, and these murders appear to be ordinary—and thus of lesser priority. But when the evidence suggests high-level involvement, and the body count increases, Swallow must navigate the treacherous waters of foolish superiors, political directives, and frayed tempers to solve the case, find the true murderer, and deliver justice. Written by Conor Brady, the former editor of The Irish Times, A June of Ordinary Murders is an accomplished, atmospheric debut that captures the life and essence of Dublin in the 1880s and introduces an unforgettable new sleuth.

The Eloquence Of The Dead

Author: Conor Brady
Publisher: Minotaur Books
ISBN: 1466861274
Size: 49.14 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"Bodies can tell you a lot. There can be an eloquence about the dead. But you have to be able to interpret what they are telling you... " This captivating, expertly crafted mystery captures the life and essence of Victorian Dublin and draws the reader on a gripping journey of murder and intrigue. When a Dublin Pawnbroker is found murdered and the lead suspect goes missing, Sergeant Joe Swallow is handed the poisoned chalice of the investigation. On the way he uncovers deep-rooted corruption, discovers the power of new, scientific detection techniques and encounters a ruthless adversary. With authorities pressing for a quick resolution, the public living in fear of attack and the newspapers happy to point to the police's every mistake, Swallow must use every trick in his arsenal to crack the case. Following leads from Trim Castle to the Tower of London, The Eloquence of the Dead is a taut, fast-paced crime thriller perfect for fans of Charles Finch and Charles Todd.