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The International Human Rights Movement

Author: Aryeh Neier
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691135150
Size: 61.76 MB
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"Aryeh Neier's insightful account of the human rights movement underlines the crucial role played by individuals and human rights defenders in speaking out against abuses. This book describes many of the human rights challenges that remain and is essential reading for all those wishing to understand the political challenges of our times."--Kofi Annan, former secretary-general of the United Nations (1997--2006) "Human rights has become a global movement. Aryeh Neier was present at the creation of it, so nobody is better qualified to tell the story of its ongoing and epochal fight against brutality and injustice. We can all be grateful for Neier's life of activism and we can be thankful he has reflected on it with such insight."--Michael Ignatieff, University of Toronto and former leader of the Liberal Party of Canada "Aryeh Neier has done more than anyone else to shape the values and practices of the modern human rights movement. His decades of experience give him a unique perspective to describe the key events and decisions that shaped the movement, to detail its major successes, and to outline the steps that must now be taken to meet the challenges ahead."--Kenneth Roth, executive director, Human Rights Watch "With the intimate knowledge--and authority--of one who has been at the center of the international human rights movement for more than three decades, Aryeh Neier captures the movement's uneven but steady rise to the top of the agenda of the world community. The significant transformations chronicled here, and the struggles of the brave men and women around the world that made these changes possible, form a road map for the enormous challenges that still lie ahead."--Juan E. Mendez, UN special rapporteur on torture and coauthor of Taking a Stand: The Evolution of Human Rights "This is a valuable, lucid, and timely account of the international human rights movement. Neier has the unique authority to guide the public's understanding of this complex landscape, and his book is full of information, vision, and wisdom."--Andrew J. Nathan, Columbia University

The International Human Rights Movement

Author: Aryeh Neier
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400841879
Size: 34.72 MB
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During the past several decades, the international human rights movement has had a crucial hand in the struggle against totalitarian regimes, cruelties in wars, and crimes against humanity. Today, it grapples with the war against terror and subsequent abuses of government power. In The International Human Rights Movement, Aryeh Neier--a leading figure and a founder of the contemporary movement--offers a comprehensive and authoritative account of this global force, from its beginnings in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to its essential place in world affairs today. Neier combines analysis with personal experience, and gives a unique insider's perspective on the movement's goals, the disputes about its mission, and its rise to international importance. Discussing the movement's origins, Neier looks at the dissenters who fought for religious freedoms in seventeenth-century England and the abolitionists who opposed slavery before the Civil War era. He pays special attention to the period from the 1970s onward, and he describes the growth of the human rights movement after the Helsinki Accords, the roles played by American presidential administrations, and the astonishing Arab revolutions of 2011. Neier argues that the contemporary human rights movement was, to a large extent, an outgrowth of the Cold War, and he demonstrates how it became the driving influence in international law, institutions, and rights. Throughout, Neier highlights key figures, controversies, and organizations, including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, and he considers the challenges to come. Illuminating and insightful, The International Human Rights Movement is a remarkable account of a significant world movement, told by a key figure in its evolution.

The International Human Rights Movement

Author: Aryeh Neier
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780691159607
Size: 36.44 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 3499
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During the past several decades, the international human rights movement has had a crucial hand in the struggle against totalitarian regimes, cruelties in wars, and crimes against humanity. Today, it grapples with the war against terror and subsequent abuses of government power. In The International Human Rights Movement, Aryeh Neier--a leading figure and a founder of the contemporary movement--offers a comprehensive and authoritative account of this global force, from its beginnings in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to its essential place in world affairs today. Neier combines analysis with personal experience, and gives a unique insider's perspective on the movement's goals, the disputes about its mission, and its rise to international importance. Discussing the movement's origins, Neier looks at the dissenters who fought for religious freedoms in seventeenth-century England and the abolitionists who opposed slavery before the Civil War era. He pays special attention to the period from the 1970s onward, and he describes the growth of the human rights movement after the Helsinki Accords, the roles played by American presidential administrations, and the astonishing Arab revolutions of 2011. Neier argues that the contemporary human rights movement was, to a large extent, an outgrowth of the Cold War, and he demonstrates how it became the driving influence in international law, institutions, and rights. Throughout, Neier highlights key figures, controversies, and organizations, including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, and he considers the challenges to come. Illuminating and insightful, The International Human Rights Movement is a remarkable account of a significant world movement, told by a key figure in its evolution.

Evidence For Hope

Author: Kathryn Sikkink
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400888530
Size: 24.63 MB
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A history of the successes of the human rights movement and a case for why human rights work Evidence for Hope makes the case that, yes, human rights work. Critics may counter that the movement is in serious jeopardy or even a questionable byproduct of Western imperialism. They point out that Guantánamo is still open, the Arab Spring protests have been crushed, and governments are cracking down on NGOs everywhere. But respected human rights expert Kathryn Sikkink draws on decades of research and fieldwork to provide a rigorous rebuttal to pessimistic doubts about human rights laws and institutions. She demonstrates that change comes slowly and as the result of struggle, but in the long term, human rights movements have been vastly effective. Attacks on the human rights movement’s credibility are based on the faulty premise that human rights ideas emerged in North America and Europe and were imposed on developing southern nations. Starting in the 1940s, Latin American leaders and activists were actually early advocates for the international protection of human rights. Sikkink shows that activists and scholars disagree about the efficacy of human rights because they use different yardsticks to measure progress. Comparing the present to the past, she shows that genocide and violence against civilians have declined over time, while access to healthcare and education has increased dramatically. Cognitive and news biases contribute to pervasive cynicism, but Sikkink’s investigation into past and current trends indicates that human rights is not in its twilight. Instead, this is a period of vibrant activism that has made impressive improvements in human well-being. Exploring the strategies that have led to real humanitarian gains since the middle of the twentieth century, Evidence for Hope looks at how these essential advances can be supported and sustained for decades to come.

Crimes Against Humanity

Author: Geoffrey Robertson
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 9781595588630
Size: 75.96 MB
Format: PDF
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When it was first published in 1999, Crimes Against Humanity called for a radical shift from diplomacy to justice in international affairs. In vivid, non-legalese prose, leading human rights lawyer Geoffrey Robertson made a riveting case for holding political and military leaders accountable in international courts for genocide, torture, and mass murder. Since then, fearsome figures such as Charles Taylor, Laurent Gbagbo, and Ratko Mladic´ have been tried in international criminal court, and a global movement has rallied around the human rights framework of justice. Any such legal framework requires constant evolution in order to stay relevant, and this newly revised and expanded volume brings the conversation up to date. In substantial new chapters, Robertson covers the protection of war correspondents, the problem of piracy, crimes against humanity in Syria, nuclear armament in Iran, and other challenges we are grappling with today. He criticizes the Obama administration’s policies around “targeted killing” and the trials of Khalid Sheik Mohammed and other “high value” detainees. By rendering a complex debate accessible, Robertson once again provides an essential guide for anyone looking to understand human rights and how to work toward a more complete blueprint for justice.

All The Missing Souls

Author: David Scheffer
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691140154
Size: 30.63 MB
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Recounts the author's experiences of setting up the International Criminal Court, including problems with achieving international cooperation for tribunals, war crimes victims, and challenges from the U.S. due to fears of soldiers facing prosecution.

Human Rights After Hitler

Author: Dan Plesch
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 1626164339
Size: 40.81 MB
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Human Rights after Hitler reveals thousands of forgotten US and Allied war crimes prosecutions against Hitler and other Axis war criminals based on a popular movement for justice that stretched from Poland to the Pacific. These cases provide a great foundation for twenty-first-century human rights and accompany the achievements of the Nuremberg trials and postwar conventions. They include indictments of perpetrators of the Holocaust made while the death camps were still operating, which confounds the conventional wisdom that there was no official Allied response to the Holocaust at the time. This history also brings long overdue credit to the United Nations War Crimes Commission (UNWCC), which operated during and after World War II. From the 1940s until a recent lobbying effort by Plesch and colleagues, the UNWCC’s files were kept out of public view in the UN archives under pressure from the US government. The book answers why the commission and its files were closed and reveals that the lost precedents set by these cases have enormous practical utility for prosecuting war crimes today. They cover US and Allied prosecutions of torture, including “water treatment,” wartime sexual assault, and crimes by foot soldiers who were “just following orders.” Plesch’s book will fascinate anyone with an interest in the history of the Second World War as well as provide ground-breaking revelations for historians and human rights practitioners alike.

East West Street

Author: Philippe Sands
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0525433724
Size: 37.85 MB
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Winner of the 2016 Baillie Gifford Prize for Nonfiction A profound and profoundly important book--a moving personal detective story, an uncovering of secret pasts, and a book that explores the creation and development of world-changing legal concepts that came about as a result of the unprecedented atrocities of Hitler's Third Reich. East West Street looks at the personal and intellectual evolution of the two men who simultaneously originated the ideas of "genocide" and "crimes against humanity," both of whom, not knowing the other, studied at the same university with the same professors, in a city little known today that was a major cultural center of Europe, "the little Paris of Ukraine," a city variously called Lemberg, Lwów, Lvov, or Lviv. It is also a spellbinding family memoir, as the author traces the mysterious story of his grandfather, as he maneuvered through Europe in the face of Nazi atrocities. East West Street is a book that changes the way we look at the world, at our understanding of history and how civilization has tried to cope with mass murder.

The Civil Rights Movement And The Logic Of Social Change

Author: Joseph E. Luders
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521116511
Size: 52.87 MB
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This book examines the success and failure of social movements to bring about change in American society, focusing on the targets of protests to explain diverse outcomes.

Human Rights In International Relations

Author: David P. Forsythe
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316878511
Size: 59.72 MB
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This fourth edition of David P. Forsythe's successful textbook provides an authoritative and timely analysis of the place of human rights in an age of upheaval in international politics. Human rights standards are examined at the global, regional and national levels, with separate chapters on transnational corporations and advocacy groups. Completely updated and revised, the fourth edition takes account of new sources and recent scholarship, as well as recent events, such as the Syrian war, the rise of ISIS, refugee flows, South Sudan crises, and the resurgence of nationalism. A new chapter has been added on the media and human rights, covering both traditional and social media. Examining attempts to protect human rights by various actors, such as the United Nations, the European Union, transnational corporations, and the media, the book stresses that the open-ended fate of universal human rights depends on human agency in this context. Containing further reading suggestions and discussion questions, this textbook is a vital resource for courses on human rights in an international context.