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The Life Of Langston Hughes

Author: Arnold Rampersad
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 70.84 MB
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Profiles one of the most extraordinary writers of the twentieth century, from his birth in Missouri in 1902, through his journeys around the world to the winter of 1941, providing insights into his political views.

The Life Of Langston Hughes

Author: Arnold Rampersad
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199882274
Size: 55.42 MB
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February 1, 2002 marks the 100th birthday of Langston Hughes. To commemorate the centennial of his birth, Arnold Rampersad has contributed new Afterwords to both volumes of his highly-praised biography of this most extraordinary and prolific American writer. The second volume in this masterful biography finds Hughes rooting himself in Harlem, receiving stimulation from his rich cultural surroundings. Here he rethought his view of art and radicalism, and cultivated relationships with younger, more militant writers such as Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Amiri Bakara. Rampersad's Afterword to volume two looks further into his influence and how it expanded beyond the literary as a result of his love of jazz and blues, his opera and musical theater collaborations, and his participation in radio and television. In addition, Rempersad explores the controversial matter of Hughes's sexuality and the possibility that, despite a lack of clear evidence, Hughes was homosexual. Exhaustively researched in archival collections throughout the country, especially in the Langston Hughes papers at Yale University's Beinecke Library, and featuring fifty illustrations per volume, this anniversary edition will offer a new generation of readers entrance to the life and mind of one of the twentieth century's greatest artists.

The Life Of Langston Hughes 1914 1967

Author: Arnold Rampersad
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780195061697
Size: 51.34 MB
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The first volume of Arnold Rampersad's The Life of Langston Hughes received enormous praise. Michael Harper hailed it in The Boston Globe as "an exquisite orchestration of the fully lived life"; Alice Walker called it "a book I have waited half a lifetime for"; and John Gross declared in The New York Times that "Rampersad [leaves] you eager to see what he makes of the rest of the story." Now we have just that: the second and final volume of Rampersad's epic biography of black America's most original and beloved poet. Rampersad traces Hughes' life from the humiliations of 1940-41, with his career in jeopardy, to his death in 1967. By that time, the world revered him not only as the dean of Afro-American writers, but also as a renowned artist whose poems, plays, and stories had profoundly influenced writers in Africa, the Caribbean, and elsewhere. This volume grippingly describes Hughes' reassessment of radicalism and art during World War II, when he contributed steadily to the national war effort even as he relentlessly attacked segregation in his country. It recounts the FBI's surveillance of him and the hounding of him by right-wing forces, including Senator Joe McCarthy, who eventually forced him to testify about his radical years. Rampersad reveals that throughout this period Hughes never lost sight of his greatest goal: to be an artist in words, committed to black life. His devotion to this dream led to an outpouring of books of verse and fiction that reflected his love of jazz and the blues; operas in which he collaborated with Kurt Weill, William Grant Still, and Jan Meyerowitz; musical plays that introduced black gospel to the American stage; books for children; and programs for radio and television featuring stars such as Harry Belafonte and Sidney Poitier. His passion for life and literature brought him into fellowship--and sometimes sharp conflict--with a wide range of writers, including Richard Wright, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Amiri Baraka. Written with Rampersad's characteristic grace and meticulous attention to detail, this book combines with the first volume to offer a matchless panorama of life and culture in America and abroad during the first seventy years of this century.

The Life Of Langston Hughes Volume I 1902 1941 I Too Sing America

Author: Arnold Rampersad
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199760861
Size: 25.72 MB
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February 1, 2002 marks the 100th birthday of Langston Hughes. To commemorate the centennial of his birth, Arnold Rampersad has contributed new Afterwords to both volumes of his highly-praised biography of this most extraordinary and prolific American writer. In young adulthood Hughes possessed a nomadic but dedicated spirit that led him from Mexico to Africa and the Soviet Union to Japan, and countless other stops around the globe. Associating with political activists, patrons, and fellow artists, and drawing inspiration from both Walt Whitman and the vibrant Afro-American culture, Hughes soon became the most original and revered of black poets. In the first volumes Afterword, Rampersad looks back at the significant early works Hughes produced, the genres he explored, and offers a new perspective on Hughess lasting literary influence. Exhaustively researched in archival collections throughout the country, especially in the Langston Hughes papers at Yale Universitys Beinecke Library, and featuring fifty illustrations per volume, this anniversary edition will offer a new generation of readers entrance to the life and mind of one of the twentieth centurys greatest artists.

Sanctuary

Author: Nicole Waligora-Davis
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195369912
Size: 56.94 MB
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In 2005, hurricane Katrina and its aftermath starkly revealed the continued racial polarization of America. Disproportionately impacted by the ravages of the storm, displaced black victims were often characterized by the media as "refugees." The characterization was wrong-headed, and yet deeply revealing. Sanctuary: African Americans and Empire traces the long history of this and related terms, like alien and foreign, a rhetorical shorthand that has shortchanged black America for over 250 years. In tracing the language and politics that have informed debates about African American citizenship, Sanctuary in effect illustrates the historical paradox of African American subjecthood: while frequently the target of legislation (slave law, the Black Codes, and Jim Crow), blacks seldom benefited from the actions of the state. Blackness helped to define social, cultural, and legal aspects of American citizenship in a manner that excluded black people themselves. They have been treated, rather, as foreigners in their home country. African American civil rights efforts worked to change this. Activists and intellectuals demanded equality, but they were often fighting for something even more fundamental: the recognition that blacks were in fact human beings. As citizenship forced acknowledgement of the humanity of African Americans, it thus became a gateway to both civil and human rights. Waligora-Davis shows how artists like Langston Hughes underscored the power of language to define political realities, how critics like W.E.B. Du Bois imagined democratic political strategies, and how they and other public figures have used their writing as a forum to challenge the bankruptcy of a social economy in which the value of human life is predicated on race and civil identity.

A Historical Guide To Langston Hughes

Author: Steven C. Tracy
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199729159
Size: 14.94 MB
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Langston Hughes has been an inspiration to generations of readers and writers seeking a passionate, intelligent, and socially responsible art. In this volume, Steven C. Tracy has gathered a broad range of critics to produce an interdisciplinary approach to the important historical and cultural elements reflected in the variety of genres in which Hughes worked. Through the lenses of creative writers, musicians, social activists and critics, this collection explores the ways that Hughes transformed American literature and society. Rooting his aesthetic in the art and values of Black folk, Hughes mediated the conflicting artistic demands of both the literati and the masses, demonstrating the social and spiritual power of art. Contributors to this volume place Hughes in the context of Harlem, his preferred geographical and spiritual home base, as well as the larger political, social, musical, and artistic milieu of his rapidly changing times. Their essays examine Hughes's negotiation of his own moral and ethical ground in a complex, sometimes hostile world, and demonstrate the remarkable triumph of a sensitive, creative human being who refused to be overwhelmed by the forces of discrimination, pessimism, and bitterness that claimed so many writers of his generation. An essentially very private individual, Hughes nonetheless rejected difficulty, obscurity, and the ivory tower in order to generate a very public life and art. This volume, with its historical essays, brief biography, and illustrated chronology, provides a concise yet authoritative portrait of one of America's and the world's most beloved writers.

Langston Hughes

Author: Harold Bloom
Publisher: Infobase Publishing
ISBN: 0791096122
Size: 66.24 MB
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Poet, playwright, novelist, and public figure, Langston Hughes is regarded as a cultural hero who made his mark during the Harlem Renaissance. A prolific author, Hughes focused his writing on discrimination in and disillusionment with American society. His most noted works include the novel Not Without Laughter, the poem "The Negro Speaks of Rivers," and the essay The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain, to name just a few. Langston Hughes, New Edition features compelling critical essays that create a well-rounded portrait of this great American writer. An introductory essay by Harold Bloom and a chronology tracing the major events in Hughes's life add further depth to this newly updated study tool.

Langston Hughes

Author: C. James Trotman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317946162
Size: 40.31 MB
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First published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Duke Ellington S America

Author: Harvey G. Cohen
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226112659
Size: 12.80 MB
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Few American artists in any medium have enjoyed the international and lasting cultural impact of Duke Ellington. From jazz standards such as “Mood Indigo” and “Don’t Get Around Much Anymore,” to his longer, more orchestral suites, to his leadership of the stellar big band he toured and performed with for decades after most big bands folded, Ellington represented a singular, pathbreaking force in music over the course of a half-century. At the same time, as one of the most prominent black public figures in history, Ellington demonstrated leadership on questions of civil rights, equality, and America’s role in the world. With Duke Ellington’s America, Harvey G. Cohen paints a vivid picture of Ellington’s life and times, taking him from his youth in the black middle class enclave of Washington, D.C., to the heights of worldwide acclaim. Mining extensive archives, many never before available, plus new interviews with Ellington’s friends, family, band members, and business associates, Cohen illuminates his constantly evolving approach to composition, performance, and the music business—as well as issues of race, equality and religion. Ellington’s own voice, meanwhile, animates the book throughout, giving Duke Ellington’s America an intimacy and immediacy unmatched by any previous account. By far the most thorough and nuanced portrait yet of this towering figure, Duke Ellington’s America highlights Ellington’s importance as a figure in American history as well as in American music.