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The Moveon Effect

Author: David Karpf
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 0199898383
Size: 38.67 MB
Format: PDF
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The Internet is facilitating a generational transition among American political advocacy organizations. This book provides a detailed exploration of how "netroots" advocacy groups - MoveOn.org, DailyKos.com, DemocracyforAmerica.com, and the Progressive Change Campaign Committee - differ from "legacy" peer organizations. It also explains the partisan character of these technological innovations.

Analytic Activism

Author: David Karpf
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190266147
Size: 29.17 MB
Format: PDF
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Among the ways that digital media has transformed political activism, the most remarkable is not that new media allows disorganized masses to speak, but that it enables organized activist groups to listen. Beneath the waves of e-petitions, "likes," and hashtags lies a sea of data - a newly quantified form of supporter sentiment - and advocacy organizations can now utilize new tools to measure this data to make decisions and shape campaigns. In this book, David Karpf discusses the power and potential of this new "analytic activism," exploring the organizational and media logics that determine how digital inputs shape the choices that political campaigners make. He provides the first careful analysis of how organizations like Change.org and Upworthy.com influence the types of political narratives that dominate our Facebook newsfeeds and Twitter timelines, and how MoveOn.org and its "netroots" peers use analytics to listen more effectively to their members and supporters. As well, he identifies the boundaries that define the scope of this new style of organized citizen engagement. But also raising a note of caution, Karpf identifies the dangers and limitations in putting too much faith in these new forms of organized listening.

Taking Our Country Back

Author: Daniel Kreiss
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199936781
Size: 52.49 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Taking Our Country Back presents the previously untold history of the uptake of new media in Democratic electoral campaigning over the last decade. Drawing on open-ended interviews with more than fifty political staffers, fieldwork during the 2008 primaries and general election, and archival research, Daniel Kreiss shows how a group of young, technically-skilled internet staffers came together on the Howard Dean campaign and created a series of innovations in organization, tools, and practice that have changed the campaign game. After the election, these individuals founded an array of consulting firms and training organizations and staffed prominent Democratic campaigns. In the process, they carried their innovations across Democratic politics and contributed to a number of electoral victories, including Barack Obama's historic bid for the presidency. In revealing this history, the book provides a rich empirical look at the communication tools, practices, and infrastructure that shape contemporary online campaigning. Through a detailed history of new media and political campaigning, Taking Our Country Back contributes to an interdisciplinary body of scholarship from communication, sociology, and political science. The book theorizes processes of innovation in online electoral politics and gives readers a new understanding of how the internet and its use by the Dean campaign have fundamentally changed the field of political campaigning. Kreiss shows how these innovations, exemplified by the Dean and Obama campaigns, were the product of the movement of staffers between industries and within organizational structures. Such movement provided a space for technical development and incentives for experimentation. Taking Our Country Back is a serious and vital analysis, both on-the-ground and theoretical, of how a small group of internet staffers transformed what campaigning means today and how cultural work mobilizes and motivates supporters to participate in collective action.

The Only Constant Is Change

Author: Ben Epstein
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190698985
Size: 50.88 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"The overarching goals of political communication rarely change, yet political communication strategies have evolved a great deal over the course of American history. As this book argues, these changes (at least the successful ones) occur during brief periods of dramatic and permanent transformation, are driven by political actors and organizations, and tend to follow predictable patterns each time. Covering over 300 years of such changes - what it identifies as Political Communication Revolutions - the book shows how this process of change happens and why. To do this, Ben Epstein, following an American Political Development approach, proposes a new model that accounts for the technological, behavioral, and political factors that lead to revolutionary political communication changes over time. In this way the book moves beyond the technological determinism that characterizes communication history scholarship and the medium-specific focus of much political communication work. The book identifies the political communication revolutions that have, in the United States, led to four, relatively stable political communication orders over history: the elite, mass, broadcast, and (the current) information orders. It identifies and tests three pattern phases of each revolution, ultimately sketching possible paths for the future"--

Democracy S Fourth Wave

Author: Philip N. Howard
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199936978
Size: 64.85 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In 2011, the international community watched as citizens mobilized through the Internet and digital media to topple three of the world's most entrenched dictators: Ben Ali in Tunisia, Mubarak in Egypt, and Qaddafi in Libya. This book examines not only the unexpected evolution of events during the Arab Spring, but the longer history of desperate-and creative-digital activism through the Arab world.

Parties Interest Groups And Political Campaigns

Author: Matthew Burbank
Publisher: Paradigm Pub
ISBN: 9781612050959
Size: 48.93 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Just in time for the 2012 US Presidential elections, this book shows how political parties and interest groups have become highly interdependent in the era of candidate-centred elections and media-driven campaigns.With up-to-date data including 2008 and 2010 mid-term results, this book looks ahead to 2012 illustrating important developments such as the Tea Party movement, social media, controversies over healthcare and financial sector reform and the impact of the Supreme Court decision on campaign finance reform.Parties, Interest Groups, and Political Campaigns is the essential guide for understanding the new style of American politics.

The Organization Of Political Interest Groups

Author: Darren R. Halpin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317814126
Size: 17.45 MB
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Interest groups form an important part of the development of political and social systems. This book goes beyond current literature in examining the survival and ‘careers’ of such groups beyond their formation. The author introduces the concept of organizational form and develops a framework to describe and evaluate organisations, and uncover how they adapt to survive. Using example case studies from the UK, US and Australia, the book presents extensive historical analyses of specific groups, to better understand the organisation and position of such groups within their political system. It analyses how groups differentiate themselves from each other, how they develop differently and what impact this has on policy implementation and democratic legitimacy. The Organization of Political Interest Groups will be of interest to students and scholars of political science, comparative politics, public representation, and public policy.

Revolution 2 0

Author: Wael Ghonim
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547774044
Size: 22.68 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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“A gripping chronicle of how a fear-frozen society finally topples its oppressors with the help of social media.” — San Francisco Chronicle Wael Ghonim was a little-known, thirty-year-old Google executive in the summer of 2010 when he anonymously launched a Facebook page to protest the death of one Egyptian man at the hands of security forces. The page’s following expanded quickly and moved from online protests to a nonconfrontational movement. On January 25, 2011, Tahrir Square resounded with calls for change. Yet just as the revolution began in earnest, Ghonim was captured and held for twelve days of brutal interrogation. After he was released, he gave a tearful speech on national television, and the protests grew more intense. Four days later, the president of Egypt was gone. In this riveting story, Ghonim takes us inside the movement and shares the keys to unleashing the power of crowds. In Revolution 2.0, we can all be heroes. “Revolution 2.0 is an engaging read, and it offers a sharply detailed look from the inside of an uprising that owed almost as much to social media connections as it did to anti-Mubarak passions.” — Los Angeles Times “Revolution 2.0 excels in chronicling the roiling tension in the months before the uprising, the careful organization required and the momentum it unleashed.” — NPR.org

Using Technology Building Democracy

Author: Jessica Baldwin-Philippi
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190231947
Size: 49.71 MB
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The days of "revolutionary" campaign strategies are gone. The extraordinary has become ordinary, and campaigns at all levels, from the federal to the municipal, have realized the necessity of incorporating digital media technologies into their communications strategies. Still, little is understood about how these practices have been taken up and routinized on a wide scale, or the ways in which the use of these technologies is tied to new norms and understandings of political participation and citizenship in the digital age. The vocabulary that we do possess for speaking about what counts as citizenship in a digital age is limited. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in a federal-level election, interviews with communications and digital media consultants, and textual analysis of campaign materials, this book traces the emergence and solidification of campaign strategies that reflect what it means to be a citizen in the digital era. It identifies shifting norms and emerging trends to build new theories of citizenship in contemporary democracy. Baldwin-Philippi argues that these campaign practices foster engaged and skeptical citizens. But, rather than assess the quality or level of participation and citizenship due to the use of technologies, this book delves into the way that digital strategies depict what "good" citizenship ought to be and the goals and values behind the tactics.

Affective Publics

Author: Zizi Papacharissi
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190243031
Size: 67.36 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Over the past few decades, we have witnessed the growth of movements using digital means to connect with broader interest groups and express their points of view. These movements emerge out of distinct contexts and yield different outcomes, but tend to share one thing in common: online and offline solidarity shaped around the public display of emotion. Social media facilitate feelings of engagement, in ways that frequently make people feel re-energized about politics. In doing so, media do not make or break revolutions but they do lend emerging, storytelling publics their own means for feeling their way into events, frequently by making those involved a part of the developing story. Technologies network us but it is our stories that connect us to each other, making us feel close to some and distancing us from others. Affective Publics explores how storytelling practices facilitate engagement among movements tuning into a current issue or event by employing three case studies: Arab Spring movements, various iterations of Occupy, and everyday casual political expressions as traced through the archives of trending topics on Twitter. It traces how affective publics materialize and disband around connective conduits of sentiment every day and find their voice through the soft structures of feeling sustained by societies. Using original quantitative and qualitative data, Affective Publics demonstrates, in this groundbreaking analysis, that it is through these soft structures that affective publics connect, disrupt, and feel their way into everyday politics.