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The Muse In Bronzeville

Author: Robert Bone
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813550432
Size: 30.49 MB
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The Muse in Bronzeville, a dynamic reappraisal of a neglected period in African American cultural history, is the first comprehensive critical study of the creative awakening that occurred on Chicago's South Side from the early 1930s to the cold war. Coming of age during the hard Depression years and in the wake of the Great Migration, this generation of Black creative artists produced works of literature, music, and visual art fully comparable in distinction and scope to the achievements of the Harlem Renaissance. This highly informative and accessible work, enhanced with reproductions of paintings of the same period, examines Black Chicago's "Renaissance" through richly anecdotal profiles of such figures as Richard Wright, Gwendolyn Brooks, Margaret Walker, Charles White, Gordon Parks, Horace Cayton, Muddy Waters, Mahalia Jackson, and Katherine Dunham. Robert Bone and Richard A. Courage make a powerful case for moving Chicago's Bronzeville, long overshadowed by New York's Harlem, from a peripheral to a central position within African American and American studies.

Dictionary Of Midwestern Literature Volume 2

Author: Philip A. Greasley
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253021162
Size: 23.73 MB
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The Midwest has produced a robust literary heritage. Its authors have won half of the nation’s Nobel Prizes for Literature plus a significant number of Pulitzer Prizes. This volume explores the rich racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity of the region. It also contains entries on 35 pivotal Midwestern literary works, literary genres, literary, cultural, historical, and social movements, state and city literatures, literary journals and magazines, as well as entries on science fiction, film, comic strips,graphic novels, and environmental writing. Prepared by a team of scholars, this second volume of the Dictionary of Midwestern Literature is a comprehensive resource that demonstrates the Midwest’s continuing cultural vitality and the stature and distinctiveness of its literature.

Along The Streets Of Bronzeville

Author: Elizabeth Schroeder Schlabach
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252095103
Size: 56.94 MB
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Along the Streets of Bronzeville examines the flowering of African American creativity, activism, and scholarship in the South Side Chicago district known as Bronzeville during the period between the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s. Poverty stricken, segregated, and bursting at the seams with migrants, Bronzeville was the community that provided inspiration, training, and work for an entire generation of diversely talented African American authors and artists who came of age during the years between the two world wars. In this significant recovery project, Elizabeth Schroeder Schlabach investigates the institutions and streetscapes of Black Chicago that fueled an entire literary and artistic movement. She argues that African American authors and artists--such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Richard Wright, Langston Hughes, painter Archibald Motley, and many others--viewed and presented black reality from a specific geographic vantage point: the view along the streets of Bronzeville. Schlabach explores how the particular rhythms and scenes of daily life in Bronzeville locations, such as the State Street "Stroll" district or the bustling intersection of 47th Street and South Parkway, figured into the creative works and experiences of the artists and writers of the Black Chicago Renaissance.

Chicago By The Book

Author: Caxton Club
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022646864X
Size: 70.92 MB
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Despite its rough-and-tumble image, Chicago has long been identified as a city where books take center stage. In fact, a volume by A. J. Liebling gave the Second City its nickname. Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle arose from the midwestern capital’s most infamous industry. The great Chicago Fire led to the founding of the Chicago Public Library. The city has fostered writers such as Nelson Algren, Saul Bellow, and Gwendolyn Brooks. Chicago’s literary magazines The Little Review and Poetry introduced the world to Eliot, Hemingway, Joyce, and Pound. The city’s robust commercial printing industry supported a flourishing culture of the book. With this beautifully produced collection, Chicago’s rich literary tradition finally gets its due. Chicago by the Book profiles 101 landmark publications about Chicago from the past 170 years that have helped define the city and its image. Each title—carefully selected by the Caxton Club, a venerable Chicago bibliophilic organization—is the focus of an illustrated essay by a leading scholar, writer, or bibliophile. Arranged chronologically to show the history of both the city and its books, the essays can be read in order from Mrs. John H. Kinzie’s 1844 Narrative of the Massacre of Chicago to Sara Paretsky’s 2015 crime novel Brush Back. Or one can dip in and out, savoring reflections on the arts, sports, crime, race relations, urban planning, politics, and even Mrs. O’Leary’s legendary cow. The selections do not shy from the underside of the city, recognizing that its grit and graft have as much a place in the written imagination as soaring odes and boosterism. As Neil Harris observes in his introduction, “Even when Chicagoans celebrate their hearth and home, they do so while acknowledging deep-seated flaws.” At the same time, this collection heartily reminds us all of what makes Chicago, as Norman Mailer called it, the “great American city.” With essays from, among others, Ira Berkow, Thomas Dyja, Ann Durkin Keating, Alex Kotlowitz, Toni Preckwinkle, Frank Rich, Don Share, Carl Smith, Regina Taylor, Garry Wills, and William Julius Wilson; and featuring works by Saul Bellow, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sandra Cisneros, Clarence Darrow, Erik Larson, David Mamet, Studs Terkel, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Frank Lloyd Wright, and many more.

Urban Green

Author: Colin Fisher
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469619962
Size: 28.48 MB
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In early twentieth-century America, affluent city-dwellers made a habit of venturing out of doors and vacationing in resorts and national parks. Yet the rich and the privileged were not the only ones who sought respite in nature. In this pathbreaking book, historian Colin Fisher demonstrates that working-class white immigrants and African Americans in rapidly industrializing Chicago also fled the urban environment during their scarce leisure time. If they had the means, they traveled to wilderness parks just past the city limits as well as to rural resorts in Wisconsin and Michigan. But lacking time and money, they most often sought out nature within the city itself--at urban parks and commercial groves, along the Lake Michigan shore, even in vacant lots. Chicagoans enjoyed a variety of outdoor recreational activities in these green spaces, and they used them to forge ethnic and working-class community. While narrating a crucial era in the history of Chicago's urban development, Fisher makes important interventions in debates about working-class leisure, the history of urban parks, environmental justice, the African American experience, immigration history, and the cultural history of nature.

Dark Days

Author: Dewey Roscoe Jones
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 9781475987508
Size: 29.21 MB
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Dewey Roscoe Jones was a pioneering African American journalist. While working for the Chicago Defender, the most widely read black newspaper in the United States, he edited a book review column and a poetry column whose contributors included Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Frank Marshall Davis, and Gwendolyn Brooks. Jones personally wrote about fifty reviews, becoming Black Chicago's premier literary critic and commentator on the Harlem Renaissance. Frequently disappointed by the novels emanating from New York, he endeavored to create his own masterwork of fiction. Dark Days is the fruit of his labors. Ishmael, the novel's protagonist, comes to age in Oklahoma, "a wild territory" where former slaves and their offspring vie with former plantation owners and their offspring to make a new life. Theirs is a common legacy of frontier violence and frontier dreams, born in the aftermath of the Civil War, forcible removal of Native Americans, and the 1889 Land Rush. Black Ishmael loves white Denise, and their interlocked fates are the center of the tale. Ishmael's turbulent journey follows Jones's own path from Muskogee to Chicago to the trenches of war-torn France. Dark Days was completed midway between 1930 publication of Langston Hughes's novel Not Without Laughter and Richard Wright's Native Son in 1940. That chronology situates it in the closing days of Harlem's Renaissance and on the cusp of Black Chicago's creative flowering. By recovering his father's novel, Dewey Roscoe Jones II has performed a service to all readers interested in the trajectory of African American creative expression in the early twentieth century. Richard A. Courage, Professor of English, Westchester Community College/SUNY; co-author of The Muse in Bronzeville: African American Creative Expression in Chicago, 1932-1950.

Der Engel Esmeralda

Author: Don DeLillo
Publisher: Kiepenheuer & Witsch
ISBN: 3462306200
Size: 79.10 MB
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Meisterhafte Literatur im Kurzformat – Don DeLillos erster Erzählband Mit seinen 15 Romanen hat sich Don DeLillo Weltruhm erschrieben. Er gilt international als einer der bedeutendsten Autoren und aussichtsreicher Nobelpreiskandidat. Zum ersten Mal legt DeLillo nun einen Erzählband vor. Die neun zwischen 1979 und 2011 entstandenen und hier erstmals gesammelten Erzählungen bieten eine virtuose Tour de Force durch den literarischen Kosmos dieses Ausnahmeschriftstellers.Die Karibik, Griechenland, Manhattan, ein Gefängnis für Wirtschaftsdelikte und das Weltall sind die Schauplätze dieser neun Erzählungen, die gleichsam als Kondensat des einzigartigen Oeuvres DeLillos gelesen werden können. Oft geht es in den Geschichten um Individuen, die sich in rätselhaften oder beängstigenden Umständen wiederfinden: ein Paar, durch einen tropischen Sturm festgehalten auf einer karibischen Insel, konfrontiert mit unzuverlässigen Flugauskünften – und einer alleinreisenden Frau. Zwei Männer in einer Raumkapsel, die auf einen von Stürmen und Kriegen zerrissenen Erdball herabschauen und Radiostimmen aus einer vergangenen Zeit hören. Zwei Nonnen, die als Streetworker in der South Bronx arbeiten und ein Wunder beglaubigen: die nächtliche Erscheinung eines ermordeten Kindes auf einer Werbetafel – der Engel Esmeralda.

Nigger Heaven

Author: Carl van Vechten
Publisher: Metrolit
ISBN: 3849300099
Size: 70.43 MB
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Als Nigger Heaven 1926 erschien, verursachte das Buch einen handfesten Skandal und wurde zum meist diskutierten Roman der Saison. Im Mittelpunkt steht ein junges Paar, eine Bibliothekarin und ein Möchtegern-Schriftsteller, gefangen im Tauziehen zwischen ihren Ambitionen, dem latenten Rassismus und den Versprechungen der afroamerikanischen Kultur Harlems. Van Vechten entführt den Leser in die Clubs und Bars und auf die Straßen Harlems. Er erzählt von der afroamerikanischen Kultur, ihrer Musik und Kunst und beschreibt die Lebensfreude und die Ausschweifungen der schwarzen Intellektuellen und der davon magisch angezogenen weißen Boheme.