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The Plausibility Of Life

Author: Marc W. Kirschner
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300119770
Size: 10.40 MB
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Two eminent biologists tackle and provide exhilarating new answers to what they argue is the central, unresolved question of evolution

The Plausibility Of Life

Author: Marc Kirschner
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300128673
Size: 13.70 MB
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Two eminent biologists tackle and provide exhilarating new answers to what they argue is the central, unresolved question of evolution

The Plausibility Of Life

Author: Marc Kirschner
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780300108651
Size: 26.67 MB
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Attempts to explain the origin of variation in evolution and explores how small, random genetic changes can be converted into complex, useful innovations.

Keywords And Concepts In Evolutionary Developmental Biology

Author:
Publisher: Discovery Publishing House
ISBN: 9788183562560
Size: 27.95 MB
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Contents: Sting Journalism: Introduction, Forms and Features, Sting Journalism: Ethics, Methods and Hidden Cameras, Sting Operations: Current Perspective, Famous Investigative Journalists and Scandals, Sting Operations in Indian Perspectives.

Developmental Plasticity And Evolution

Author: Mary Jane West-Eberhard
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198028567
Size: 25.57 MB
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The first comprehensive synthesis on development and evolution: it applies to all aspects of development, at all levels of organization and in all organisms, taking advantage of modern findings on behavior, genetics, endocrinology, molecular biology, evolutionary theory and phylogenetics to show the connections between developmental mechanisms and evolutionary change. This book solves key problems that have impeded a definitive synthesis in the past. It uses new concepts and specific examples to show how to relate environmentally sensitive development to the genetic theory of adaptive evolution and to explain major patterns of change. In this book development includes not only embryology and the ontogeny of morphology, sometimes portrayed inadequately as governed by "regulatory genes," but also behavioral development and physiological adaptation, where plasticity is mediated by genetically complex mechanisms like hormones and learning. The book shows how the universal qualities of phenotypes--modular organization and plasticity--facilitate both integration and change. Here you will learn why it is wrong to describe organisms as genetically programmed; why environmental induction is likely to be more important in evolution than random mutation; and why it is crucial to consider both selection and developmental mechanism in explanations of adaptive evolution. This book satisfies the need for a truly general book on development, plasticity and evolution that applies to living organisms in all of their life stages and environments. Using an immense compendium of examples on many kinds of organisms, from viruses and bacteria to higher plants and animals, it shows how the phenotype is reorganized during evolution to produce novelties, and how alternative phenotypes occupy a pivotal role as a phase of evolution that fosters diversification and speeds change. The arguments of this book call for a new view of the major themes of evolutionary biology, as shown in chapters on gradualism, homology, environmental induction, speciation, radiation, macroevolution, punctuation, and the maintenance of sex. No other treatment of development and evolution since Darwin's offers such a comprehensive and critical discussion of the relevant issues. Developmental Plasticity and Evolution is designed for biologists interested in the development and evolution of behavior, life-history patterns, ecology, physiology, morphology and speciation. It will also appeal to evolutionary paleontologists, anthropologists, psychologists, and teachers of general biology.

Cells Embryos And Evolution

Author: Jon Gerhart
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN:
Size: 47.23 MB
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This long awaited core textbook in the study of evolution takes a similar approach to the subject as Roger Lewin's classic text, Human Evolution, but goes a step further. The many important discoveries and new evidence that have emerged since the last edition make this book a timely and necessary addition to any introductory evolution course."

Probably Approximately Correct

Author: Leslie Valiant
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465032710
Size: 66.89 MB
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Presenting a theory of the theoryless, a computer scientist provides a model of how effective behavior can be learned even in a world as complex as our own, shedding new light on human nature.

Niche Construction

Author: F. John Odling-Smee
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400847265
Size: 19.44 MB
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The seemingly innocent observation that the activities of organisms bring about changes in environments is so obvious that it seems an unlikely focus for a new line of thinking about evolution. Yet niche construction--as this process of organism-driven environmental modification is known--has hidden complexities. By transforming biotic and abiotic sources of natural selection in external environments, niche construction generates feedback in evolution on a scale hitherto underestimated--and in a manner that transforms the evolutionary dynamic. It also plays a critical role in ecology, supporting ecosystem engineering and influencing the flow of energy and nutrients through ecosystems. Despite this, niche construction has been given short shrift in theoretical biology, in part because it cannot be fully understood within the framework of standard evolutionary theory. Wedding evolution and ecology, this book extends evolutionary theory by formally including niche construction and ecological inheritance as additional evolutionary processes. The authors support their historic move with empirical data, theoretical population genetics, and conceptual models. They also describe new research methods capable of testing the theory. They demonstrate how their theory can resolve long-standing problems in ecology, particularly by advancing the sorely needed synthesis of ecology and evolution, and how it offers an evolutionary basis for the human sciences. Already hailed as a pioneering work by some of the world's most influential biologists, this is a rare, potentially field-changing contribution to the biological sciences.

Discipline And Experience

Author: Peter Dear
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226139441
Size: 73.59 MB
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Although the Scientific Revolution has long been regarded as the beginning of modern science, there has been little consensus about its true character. While the application of mathematics to the study of the natural world has always been recognized as an important factor, the role of experiment has been less clearly understood. Peter Dear investigates the nature of the change that occurred during this period, focusing particular attention on evolving notions of experience and how these developed into the experimental work that is at the center of modern science. He examines seventeenth-century mathematical sciences—astronomy, optics, and mechanics—not as abstract ideas, but as vital enterprises that involved practices related to both experience and experiment. Dear illuminates how mathematicians and natural philosophers of the period—Mersenne, Descartes, Pascal, Barrow, Newton, Boyle, and the Jesuits—used experience in their argumentation, and how and why these approaches changed over the course of a century. Drawing on mathematical texts and works of natural philosophy from all over Europe, he describes a process of change that was gradual, halting, sometimes contradictory—far from the sharp break with intellectual tradition implied by the term "revolution."