Download the populist signal why politics and democracy need to change in pdf or read the populist signal why politics and democracy need to change in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get the populist signal why politics and democracy need to change in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



The Populist Signal

Author: Claudia Chwalisz
Publisher: Policy Network
ISBN: 9781783485420
Size: 42.74 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 786
Download and Read
This book gathers together new survey data, interviews and case studies to explore the rise of populism and the need for democratic change across Britain and Europe.

The Predistribution Agenda

Author: Claudia Chwalisz
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857729101
Size: 32.68 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 1586
Download and Read
The concept of predistribution is increasingly setting the agenda in progressive politics. But what does it mean? The predistributive agenda is concerned with how states can alter the underlying distribution of market outcomes so they no longer rely solely on post hoc redistribution to achieve economic efficiency and social justice. It therefore offers an effective means of tackling economic and social inequality alongside traditional welfare policies, emphasising employability, human capital, and skills, as well as structuring markets to promote greater equity. At the same time, experts have warned that any shift away from a welfare state underpinned by traditional programmes of redistribution is potentially misguided: redistribution and predistribution should be complimentary rather than alternative strategies. This book explores how far key concerns of the pre-distribution agenda relate to social democratic politics in Western European societies, in particular how to secure the support of middle-income voters, women and families, and younger generational cohorts in an era of austerity. This book examines the key debates surrounding the emergence and development of predistributive thought with contributions from leading international scholars and policy-makers.

Class Politics And The Decline Of Deference In England 1968 2000

Author: Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198812574
Size: 23.65 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 4113
Download and Read
In late twentieth-century England, inequality was rocketing, yet some have suggested that the politics of class was declining in significance, while others argue that class identities lost little power. Neither interpretation is satisfactory: class remained important to "ordinary" people'snarratives about social change and their own identities throughout the period 1968-2000, but in changing ways. Using self-narratives drawn from a wide range of sources - the raw materials of sociological studies, transcripts from oral history projects, Mass Observation, and autobiography - the book examines class identities and narratives of social change between 1968 and 2000, showing that by the end of theperiod, class was often seen as an historical identity, related to background and heritage, and that many felt strict class boundaries had blurred quite profoundly since 1945. Class snobberies "went underground", as many people from all backgrounds began to assert that what was important wasauthenticity, individuality, and ordinariness. In fact, Sutcliffe-Braithwaite argues that it is more useful to understand the cultural changes of these years through the lens of the decline of deference, which transformed people's attitudes towards class, and towards politics.The study also examines the claim that Thatcher and New Labour wrote class out of politics, arguing that this simple - and highly political - narrative misses important points. Thatcher was driven by political ideology and necessity to try to dismiss the importance of class, while the New Labourproject was good at listening to voters - particularly swing voters in marginal seats - and echoing back what they were increasingly saying about the blurring of class lines and the importance of ordinariness. But this did not add up to an abandonment of a majoritarian project, as New Labourreoriented their political project to emphasize using the state to empower the individual.

What Kind Of Democracy Is This

Author: Matthew Flinders
Publisher: Policy Press
ISBN: 1447339924
Size: 76.45 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 2699
Download and Read
Has there ever been a period in modern history when democratic politics seemed more unpredictable or unruly? Matthew Flinders ranges expertly across architecture, art, fell running and fairy tales in an attempt to understand the emerging democratic landscape. This refreshing and stimulating book seeks to provoke and inform in equal measure.

Populism S Power

Author: Laura Grattan
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190277629
Size: 39.62 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 6355
Download and Read
"In Populism's Power, Laura Grattan looks at how populism cultivates the aspirations of ordinary people to exercise power over their everyday lives and their collective fate. She considers a range of populist moments and reopens the idea that grassroots movements can play a key role in democratizing power and politics in America"--

The People S Verdict

Author: Claudia Chwalisz
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781786604361
Size: 56.90 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 3391
Download and Read
Offers a study of close to 50 long-form deliberative processes in Canada and Australia.

People Power In An Era Of Global Crisis

Author: Barry K. Gills
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317967437
Size: 55.70 MB
Format: PDF
View: 1092
Download and Read
A quarter of a century has now passed since the historic popular uprising that led to the overthrow of the Ferdinand Marcos dictatorship in the Philippines. The mass movement known as the "People Power Revolution" was not only pivotal to the democratic transition within the Philippines, but it also became an inspiration for subsequent mass movements leading to further democratic transitions throughout the Third World and in the former Communist bloc in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. However, the neoliberal economic policies subsequently pursued by newly democratic governments throughout the Third World led all but the most celebratory observers to note the constrained and limited nature of these formal political transitions. This volume poses the question of the extent to which ‘people power’ has been able to play an active role resisting neoliberalism and deepen substantive democracy and social justice. Through a series of case studies of the regions and individual countries of Asia, Africa, Latin America and Eastern Europe, the contributions in the volume provide a new set of original and in-depth critical assessments of the nature of the longer-term impact of the democratic transitions commencing in the 1980s and continuing until the present, and questioning their impact and potential influence on human dignity, freedom, justice, and self-determination, and thus opening new avenues of enquiry into the future of democracy. This book was originally published as a special issue of Third World Quarterly.

Citizen Politics

Author: Russell J. Dalton
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 1483321436
Size: 23.91 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 1367
Download and Read
Now, more than ever, people drive the democratic process. What people think of their government and its leaders, how (or whether) they vote, and what they do or say about a host of political issues greatly affect the further strengthening or erosion of democracy and democratic ideals. This fully updated new sixth edition of Citizen Politics: Public Opinion and Political Parties in Advanced Industrial Democracies, by Russell J. Dalton, continues to offer the only truly comparative study of political attitudes and behavior in the United States, Great Britain, France, and Germany. In addition to its comprehensive, thematic examination of political values, political activity, voting, and public images of government within a cross-national context, Citizen Politics explores new forms of political activity, such as Internet-based activism and new forms of political consumerism. All chapters have been updated with the latest research and empirical evidence. Further, Dalton includes new discussions of citizen sophistication and its implications for democratic citizenship.

Changing Nature Of Democracy

Author: Inoguchi, Takashi
Publisher: United Nations Univ
ISBN: 9789280810059
Size: 79.43 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 2386
Download and Read
Democracy is recognized as the primary vehicle for the fulfilment of individual and collective aspirations, the articulation of interests, and the nurturing of civil society. Globalizing forces have underpinned the spread of this message across the globe. Yet the march of democratization is highly contested and politicized and there is little consensus on what democracy is or should be. This volume brings together preeminent scholars from around the world in a collection of essays that point to a changing and broadening agenda of democracy. Themes addressed include challenges to democracy in established democracies and in transitional societies, the media and communications, globalization, criteria of democracy, religion, culture, civil society, and the internationalization of the democratic ethos. While democracy has been given a new lease on life in the post-Cold War context and its sphere of applicability has widened beyond the state closure, this book highlights the limitations and tensions of this worldwide movement.