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The Press The Rosenbergs And The Cold War

Author: John F. Neville
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275949952
Size: 53.98 MB
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A concisely written documentary history of the Rosenberg case that interprets the news media's unexplored role in reporting the case.

Executing The Rosenbergs

Author: Lori Clune
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190265884
Size: 69.94 MB
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"The Rosenberg case tested the limits of the federal government's new Cold War propaganda apparatus. Both the Harry Truman and Dwight Eisenhower administrations struggled to sell the guilt of the two spies and use the case to sell democracy and freedom overseas. However, citizens around the world did not always agree with the United States' execution of the Rosenbergs, which diminished the standing of the country in the eyes of the world, particularly so soon after the death of Stalin and the removal of the face of evil global Communism. In this first book, Lori Clune uses newly discovered State Department documents to demonstrate dissent to the Rosenberg decision from 80 cities in 48 countries in the early 1950s. American diplomats overseas observed and reported protests, petitions, letters of support, and newspaper editorials back to the State Department, along with policy recommendations. This project tells a new narrative of the Rosenbergs by transcending questions of guilt and innocence, adding a transnational component to the story and weaving the case into the Korean War, the death of Stalin, and the Cold War more broadly. While the Rosenbergs have been the subject of endless debate and discussion for half a century, this book offers an original approach to the topic, one that will no doubt add fodder to the politically passionate and provide a significant case study for those interested in the US relationship with the world"--

The Press On Trial

Author: Lloyd Chiasson
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0275959368
Size: 53.15 MB
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Tells the stories of sixteen famous crimes and the trials and press coverage that ensued. The trials covered range from the John Peter Zenger free speech trial in 1735 to the O. J. Simpson trial in 1995.

Framing History

Author: Virginia Carmichael
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 9780816620425
Size: 74.34 MB
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In this book Virginia Carmichael offers a provocative new interpretation of the Rosenberg story. Carmichael argues that this social drama produced many stories serving multiple interests and functions, many of which confront the politics of both writing and reading. She also demonstrates that this story's resistance to closure-manifest in its repeated tellings in historiography, biography, literature, and the visual and performing arts-suggests its lasting cultural impact on a nation coming to terms with the end of the cold war era.

The Rosenberg Cold War Spy Trial

Author: Judy Monroe
Publisher: Enslow Pub Incorporated
ISBN: 9780766014794
Size: 26.36 MB
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Chronicles the American political climate after World War II and the events that led to the arrest and execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg.

The Cultural Cold War

Author: Frances Stonor Saunders
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595589422
Size: 58.28 MB
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During the Cold War, freedom of expression was vaunted as liberal democracy’s most cherished possession—but such freedom was put in service of a hidden agenda. In The Cultural Cold War, Frances Stonor Saunders reveals the extraordinary efforts of a secret campaign in which some of the most vocal exponents of intellectual freedom in the West were working for or subsidized by the CIA—whether they knew it or not. Called "the most comprehensive account yet of the [CIA’s] activities between 1947 and 1967" by the New York Times, the book presents shocking evidence of the CIA’s undercover program of cultural interventions in Western Europe and at home, drawing together declassified documents and exclusive interviews to expose the CIA’s astonishing campaign to deploy the likes of Hannah Arendt, Isaiah Berlin, Leonard Bernstein, Robert Lowell, George Orwell, and Jackson Pollock as weapons in the Cold War. Translated into ten languages, this classic work—now with a new preface by the author—is "a real contribution to popular understanding of the postwar period" (The Wall Street Journal), and its story of covert cultural efforts to win hearts and minds continues to be relevant today.

Pursuing Privacy In Cold War America

Author: Deborah Nelson
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231505884
Size: 21.16 MB
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Pursuing Privacy in Cold War America explores the relationship between confessional poetry and constitutional privacy doctrine, both of which emerged at the end of the 1950s. While the public declarations of the Supreme Court and the private declamations of the lyric poet may seem unrelated, both express the upheavals in American notions of privacy that marked the Cold War era. Nelson situates the poetry and legal decisions as part of a far wider anxiety about privacy that erupted across the social, cultural, and political spectrum during this period. She explores the panic over the "death of privacy" aroused by broad changes in postwar culture: the growth of suburbia, the advent of television, the popularity of psychoanalysis, the arrival of computer databases, and the spectacles of confession associated with McCarthyism. Examining this interchange between poetry and law at its most intense moments of reflection in the 1960s, '70s, and '80s, Deborah Nelson produces a rhetorical analysis of a privacy concept integral to postwar America's self-definition and to bedrock contradictions in Cold War ideology. Nelson argues that the desire to stabilize privacy in a constitutional right and the movement toward confession in postwar American poetry were not simply manifestations of the anxiety about privacy. Supreme Court justices and confessional poets such as Anne Sexton, Robert Lowell, W. D. Snodgrass, and Sylvia Plath were redefining the nature of privacy itself. Close reading of the poetry alongside the Supreme Court's shifting definitions of privacy in landmark decisions reveals a broader and deeper cultural metaphor at work.

American Night

Author: Alan M. Wald
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807837342
Size: 55.30 MB
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American Night, the final volume of an unprecedented trilogy, brings Alan Wald's multigenerational history of Communist writers to a poignant climax. Using new research to explore the intimate lives of novelists, poets, and critics during the Cold War, Wald reveals a radical community longing for the rebirth of the social vision of the 1930s and struggling with a loss of moral certainty as the Communist worldview was being called into question. The resulting literature, Wald shows, is a haunting record of fracture and struggle linked by common structures of feeling, ones more suggestive of the "negative dialectics" of Theodor Adorno than the traditional social realism of the Left. Establishing new points of contact among Kenneth Fearing, Ann Petry, Alexander Saxton, Richard Wright, Jo Sinclair, Thomas McGrath, and Carlos Bulosan, Wald argues that these writers were in dialogue with psychoanalysis, existentialism, and postwar modernism, often generating moods of piercing emotional acuity and cosmic dissent. He also recounts the contributions of lesser known cultural workers, with a unique accent on gays and lesbians, secular Jews, and people of color. The vexing ambiguities of an era Wald labels "late antifascism" serve to frame an impressive collective biography.