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The Price Of Politics

Author: Kyle Scott
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0739133845
Size: 23.44 MB
Format: PDF
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The Price of Politics examines the historical, political, and legal heritage of the U.S. Constitution's Bill of Rights to come to grips with modern political developments. Using a cross-disciplinary, multi-methods approach, this book explores both the normative and the emperical dimensions of the debate.

The Grasping Hand

Author: Ilya Somin
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022645682X
Size: 36.39 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In 2005, the Supreme Court ruled that the city of New London, Connecticut, could condemn fifteen residential properties in order to transfer them to a new private owner. Although the Fifth Amendment only permits the taking of private property for “public use,” the Court ruled that the transfer of condemned land to private parties for “economic development” is permitted by the Constitution—even if the government cannot prove that the expected development will ever actually happen. The Court’s decision in Kelo v. City of New London empowered the grasping hand of the state at the expense of the invisible hand of the market. In this detailed study of one of the most controversial Supreme Court cases in modern times, Ilya Somin argues that Kelo was a grave error. Economic development and “blight” condemnations are unconstitutional under both originalist and most “living constitution” theories of legal interpretation. They also victimize the poor and the politically weak for the benefit of powerful interest groups and often destroy more economic value than they create. Kelo itself exemplifies these patterns. The residents targeted for condemnation lacked the influence needed to combat the formidable government and corporate interests arrayed against them. Moreover, the city’s poorly conceived development plan ultimately failed: the condemned land lies empty to this day, occupied only by feral cats. The Supreme Court’s unpopular ruling triggered an unprecedented political reaction, with forty-five states passing new laws intended to limit the use of eminent domain. But many of the new laws impose few or no genuine constraints on takings. The Kelo backlash led to significant progress, but not nearly as much as it may have seemed. Despite its outcome, the closely divided 5-4 ruling shattered what many believed to be a consensus that virtually any condemnation qualifies as a public use under the Fifth Amendment. It also showed that there is widespread public opposition to eminent domain abuse. With controversy over takings sure to continue, The Grasping Hand offers the first book-length analysis of Kelo by a legal scholar, alongside a broader history of the dispute over public use and eminent domain and an evaluation of options for reform.

Federalism

Author: Kyle Scott
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1441114203
Size: 74.39 MB
Format: PDF
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Using case studies from around the world, this book develops a new theory of federalism, showing that it can enhance deliberative democracy and civil society.

The Pursuit Of Justice

Author: Edward J. López
Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan
ISBN:
Size: 50.88 MB
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The Pursuit of Justice is a realistic yet hopeful analysis of how the law works in practice rather than in theory. The multi-chapter discussion recognizes that decision makers in the law -- judges, lawyers, juries, police, forensic experts and more -- respond systematically to the incentive structures with which they are confronted. In turn, incentives are a function of economic and institutional design. While these chapters shed light on how perverse incentives result in adverse outcomes, each chapter also suggests institutional reforms that would create better incentives within the legal system.