Download the right kind of revolution in pdf or read the right kind of revolution in pdf online books in PDF, EPUB and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get the right kind of revolution in pdf book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.



The Right Kind Of Revolution

Author: Michael E. Latham
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801477263
Size: 56.46 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 4276
Download and Read
"Well written, broad-gauged, and just plain smart, The Right Kind of Revolution ably synthesizes, indeed moves beyond, the scholarship on American efforts to `improve' the Third World. The new standard work on American modernization and development policies, it has much to teach scholars and graduate students while still being suitable for use in undergraduate courses."---David Engerman, Brandeis University, author of Know Your Enemy: The Rise and Fall of America's Soviet Experts Development, and the Global Cold War and Knowledge and Postmodernism in Historical Perspective.

The Right Kind Of Revolution

Author: Michael E. Latham
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801460562
Size: 53.36 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 3585
Download and Read
After World War II, a powerful conviction took hold among American intellectuals and policymakers: that the United States could profoundly accelerate and ultimately direct the development of the decolonizing world, serving as a modernizing force around the globe. By accelerating economic growth, promoting agricultural expansion, and encouraging the rise of enlightened elites, they hoped to link development with security, preventing revolutions and rapidly creating liberal, capitalist states. In The Right Kind of Revolution, Michael E. Latham explores the role of modernization and development in U.S. foreign policy from the early Cold War through the present. The modernization project rarely went as its architects anticipated. Nationalist leaders in postcolonial states such as India, Ghana, and Egypt pursued their own independent visions of development. Attempts to promote technological solutions to development problems also created unintended consequences by increasing inequality, damaging the environment, and supporting coercive social policies. In countries such as Guatemala, South Vietnam, and Iran, U.S. officials and policymakers turned to modernization as a means of counterinsurgency and control, ultimately shoring up dictatorial regimes and exacerbating the very revolutionary dangers they wished to resolve. Those failures contributed to a growing challenge to modernization theory in the late 1960s and 1970s. Since the end of the Cold War the faith in modernization as a panacea has reemerged. The idea of a global New Deal, however, has been replaced by a neoliberal emphasis on the power of markets to shape developing nations in benevolent ways. U.S. policymakers have continued to insist that history has a clear, universal direction, but events in Iraq and Afghanistan give the lie to modernization's false hopes and appealing promises.

Df Right Kind Of Revolution Z

Author: Michael E. Latham
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780801460531
Size: 43.80 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 7750
Download and Read
After World War II, a powerful conviction took hold among American intellectuals and policymakers: that the United States could profoundly accelerate and ultimately direct the development of the decolonizing world, serving as a modernizing force around the globe. By accelerating economic growth, promoting agricultural expansion, and encouraging the rise of enlightened elites, they hoped to link development with security, preventing revolutions and rapidly creating liberal, capitalist states. In The Right Kind of Revolution, Michael E. Latham explores the role of modernization and development in U.S. foreign policy from the early Cold War through the present. The modernization project rarely went as its architects anticipated. Nationalist leaders in postcolonial states such as India, Ghana, and Egypt pursued their own independent visions of development. Attempts to promote technological solutions to development problems also created unintended consequences by increasing inequality, damaging the environment, and supporting coercive social policies. In countries such as Guatemala, South Vietnam, and Iran, U.S. officials and policymakers turned to modernization as a means of counterinsurgency and control, ultimately shoring up dictatorial regimes and exacerbating the very revolutionary dangers they wished to resolve. Those failures contributed to a growing challenge to modernization theory in the late 1960s and 1970s. Since the end of the Cold War the faith in modernization as a panacea has reemerged. The idea of a global New Deal, however, has been replaced by a neoliberal emphasis on the power of markets to shape developing nations in benevolent ways. U.S. policymakers have continued to insist that history has a clear, universal direction, but events in Iraq and Afghanistan give the lie to modernization's false hopes and appealing promises.

Mandarins Of The Future

Author: Nils Gilman
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801886331
Size: 64.32 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 2716
Download and Read
Because it provided the dominant framework for the "development" of poor, postcolonial countries, modernization theory ranks among the most important constructs of twentieth-century social science. In Mandarins of the Future, Nils Gilman offers the first intellectual history of a movement that has had far-reaching, and often unintended, consequences.

The Radicalism Of The American Revolution

Author: Gordon S. Wood
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307758966
Size: 42.92 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 4652
Download and Read
In a grand and immemsely readable synthesis of historical, political, cultural, and economic analysis, a prize-winning historian describes the events that made the American Revolution. Gordon S. Wood depicts a revolution that was about much more than a break from England, rather it transformed an almost feudal society into a democratic one, whose emerging realities sometimes baffled and disappointed its founding fathers.

Nicaragua

Author: Philip Zwerling
Publisher: Lawrence Hill Books
ISBN:
Size: 67.99 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 6087
Download and Read

Rebel Cities From The Right To The City To The Urban Revolution

Author: David Harvey
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1844678822
Size: 28.42 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 1686
Download and Read
Explores cities as the origin of revolutionary politics, where social and political issues are always at the surface, using examples from such cities as New York City and Mumbai to examine how they can be better ecologically reorganized.

The Royalist Revolution

Author: Eric Nelson
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 067473534X
Size: 58.89 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 6501
Download and Read
The founding fathers were rebels against the British Parliament, Eric Nelson argues, not the Crown. As a result of their labors, the 1787 Constitution assigned its new president far more power than any British monarch had wielded for 100 years. On one side of the Atlantic were kings without monarchy; on the other, monarchy without kings.

Talkin Bout A Revolution

Author: Dick Weissman
Publisher: Backbeat Books
ISBN: 1476854521
Size: 48.49 MB
Format: PDF
View: 2943
Download and Read
(Book). Talkin' 'Bout a Revolution is a comprehensive guide to the relationship between American music and politics. Music expert Dick Weissman opens with the dawn of American history, then moves to the book's key focus: 20th-century music songs by and about Native Americans, African-Americans, women, Spanish-speaking groups, and more. Unprecedented in its approach, the book offers a multidisciplinary discussion that is broad and diverse, and illuminates how social events impact music as well as how music impacts social events. Weissman delves deep, covering everything from current Native American music to "music of hate" racist and neo-Nazi music to the music of the Gulf wars, union songs, patriotic and antiwar songs, and beyond. A powerful tool for professors teaching classes about politics and music and a stimulating, accessible read for all kinds of appreciators, from casual music fans to social science lovers and devout music history buffs.