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The Rise Of Gospel Blues

Author: Michael W. Harris
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195358117
Size: 79.61 MB
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Most observers believe that gospel music has been sung in African-American churches since their organization in the late 1800s. Yet nothing could be further from the truth, as Michael W. Harris's history of gospel blues reveals. Tracing the rise of gospel blues as seen through the career of its founding figure, Thomas Andrew Dorsey, Harris tells the story of the most prominent person in the advent of gospel blues. Also known as "Georgia Tom," Dorsey had considerable success in the 1920s as a pianist, composer, and arranger for prominent blues singes including Ma Rainey. In the 1930s he became involved in Chicago's African-American, old-line Protestant churches, where his background in the blues greatly influenced his composing and singing. Following much controversy during the 1930s and the eventual overwhelming response that Dorsey's new form of music received, the gospel blues became a major force in African-American churches and religion. His more than 400 gospel songs and recent Grammy Award indicate that he is still today the most prolific composer/publisher in the movement. Delving into the life of the central figure of gospel blues, Harris illuminates not only the evolution of this popular musical form, but also the thought and social forces that forged the culture in which this music was shaped.

The Rise Of Gospel Blues

Author: Michael W. Harris
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195090578
Size: 12.83 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 3619
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Most observers believe that gospel music has been sung in African-American churches since their organization in the late 1800s. Yet nothing could be further from the truth, as Michael W. Harris's history of gospel blues reveals. Tracing the rise of gospel blues as seen through the career ofits founding figure, Thomas Andrew Dorsey, Harris tells the story of the most prominent person in the advent of gospel blues. Also known as "Georgia Tom," Dorsey had considerable success in the 1920s as a pianist, composer, and arranger for prominent blues singes including Ma Rainey. In the 1930s he became involved in Chicago's African-American, old-line Protestant churches, where his background in the blues greatlyinfluenced his composing and singing. Following much controversy during the 1930s and the eventual overwhelming response that Dorsey's new form of music received, the gospel blues became a major force in African-American churches and religion. His more than 400 gospel songs and recent Grammy Awardindicate that he is still today the most prolific composer/publisher in the movement. Delving into the life of the central figure of gospel blues, Harris illuminates not only the evolution of this popular musical form, but also the thought and social forces that forged the culture in which thismusic was shaped.

The Rise Of Gospel Blues

Author: Michael W. Harris
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199879885
Size: 16.23 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 6829
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Most observers believe that gospel music has been sung in African-American churches since their organization in the late 1800s. Yet nothing could be further from the truth, as Michael W. Harris's history of gospel blues reveals. Tracing the rise of gospel blues as seen through the career of its founding figure, Thomas Andrew Dorsey, Harris tells the story of the most prominent person in the advent of gospel blues. Also known as "Georgia Tom," Dorsey had considerable success in the 1920s as a pianist, composer, and arranger for prominent blues singes including Ma Rainey. In the 1930s he became involved in Chicago's African-American, old-line Protestant churches, where his background in the blues greatly influenced his composing and singing. Following much controversy during the 1930s and the eventual overwhelming response that Dorsey's new form of music received, the gospel blues became a major force in African-American churches and religion. His more than 400 gospel songs and recent Grammy Award indicate that he is still today the most prolific composer/publisher in the movement. Delving into the life of the central figure of gospel blues, Harris illuminates not only the evolution of this popular musical form, but also the thought and social forces that forged the culture in which this music was shaped.

Father Of Black Gospel Music An Interview

Author: Robert L. Taylor
Publisher: Trafford Publishing
ISBN: 1466987820
Size: 73.13 MB
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Mr. Thomas Andrew Dorseys telephone number was given to the writer of this newly released book by the name, Thomas A. Dorsey, Father of Black Gospel Music An Interview, by a directory assistance operator in Chicago, Illinois. The writer, at the time, (1975) took a chance and called, not expecting the first publisher of Black Gospel Music, to answer the phone. A very hoarse voice said Hello, and the writer recognized it immediately as being the voice he had heard on a recording about Gospel Music that Mr. Dorsey had done. After being asked if he would consent to being interviewed Mr. Dorsey unenthusiastically said yes. He was unenthusiastic the writer later discovered, because fortune hunters and status seekers had been plaguing him for interviews. Honored that Mr. Dorsey had said yes, the writer took a train from Kansas City, Missouri to Chicago, to interview this man who had written hundreds of songs.

Anointed To Sing The Gospel

Author: Kathryn B. Kemp
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780983363040
Size: 73.12 MB
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Anointed to Sing the Gospel is the biography of the "Father of Gospel Music," Dr. Thomas A. Dorsey from Villa Rica, GA to Chicago, IL. It encompasses the spiritual dilemma that caused him to cross-over completely to the gospel song from blues and jazz. The impact of Thomas A. Dorsey as a modern-day Levite and his impact on music of the 20th and 21st century Levites is examined. Interviews with contemporaries and devotees of Thomas A. Dorsey are included.

Songsters And Saints

Author: Paul Oliver
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521269421
Size: 72.21 MB
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Paul Oliver rediscovers the wealth of neglected vocal traditions represented on Race records.

The Gospel According To The Blues

Author: Gary W. Burnett
Publisher: The Lutterworth Press
ISBN: 0718843657
Size: 22.36 MB
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The Gospel According to the Blues' dares us to read Jesus's Sermon on the Mount in conversation with Robert Johnson, Son House, and Muddy Waters. It suggests that thinking about the blues—the history, the artists, the song—provides good stimulation for thinking about the Christian gospel. Both are about a world gone wrong, about injustice, about the human condition, and about hope for a better world. In this book, Gary Burnett probes both the gospel and the history of the blues, to help us understand better the nature of the good news that Jesus preached, and its relevance and challenge to us.

A Blues Bibliography

Author: Robert Ford
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135865086
Size: 35.99 MB
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A Blues Bibliography, Second Edition is a revised and enlarged version of the definitive blues bibliography first published in 1999. Material previously omitted from the first edition has now been included, and the bibliography has been expanded to include works published since then. In addition to biographical references, this work includes entries on the history and background of the blues, instruments, record labels, reference sources, regional variations and lyric transcriptions and musical analysis. The Blues Bibliography is an invaluable guide to the enthusiastic market among libraries specializing in music and African-American culture and among individual blues scholars.

Chicago S New Negroes

Author: Davarian L. Baldwin
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807887608
Size: 76.35 MB
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As early-twentieth-century Chicago swelled with an influx of at least 250,000 new black urban migrants, the city became a center of consumer capitalism, flourishing with professional sports, beauty shops, film production companies, recording studios, and other black cultural and communal institutions. Davarian Baldwin argues that this mass consumer marketplace generated a vibrant intellectual life and planted seeds of political dissent against the dehumanizing effects of white capitalism. Pushing the traditional boundaries of the Harlem Renaissance to new frontiers, Baldwin identifies a fresh model of urban culture rich with politics, ingenuity, and entrepreneurship. Baldwin explores an abundant archive of cultural formations where an array of white observers, black cultural producers, critics, activists, reformers, and black migrant consumers converged in what he terms a "marketplace intellectual life." Here the thoughts and lives of Madam C. J. Walker, Oscar Micheaux, Andrew "Rube" Foster, Elder Lucy Smith, Jack Johnson, and Thomas Dorsey emerge as individual expressions of a much wider spectrum of black political and intellectual possibilities. By placing consumer-based amusements alongside the more formal arenas of church and academe, Baldwin suggests important new directions for both the historical study and the constructive future of ideas and politics in American life.