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The Royal Prerogative And The Learning Of The Inns Of Court

Author: Margaret McGlynn
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780511057373
Size: 60.64 MB
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Between the mid-fifteenth and mid-sixteenth century Prerogativa Regis, a central text of fiscal feudalism, was introduced into the curriculum of the Inns of Court, developed, and then abandoned. This 2003 book argues that while lawyers often turned their attention to the text when political and financial issues brought it to the fore, they sought to maintain an intellectual consistency and coherence in the law. Discussions of both substance and procedure demonstrate how readers reflected the concerns of their time in the topics they chose to consider and how they drew on the learning of both their predecessors and their peers at the Inns. The first study based primarily on readings, this book threw light on legal education, early Tudor financial and administrative procedure, and the relationship between the ways that law was made, taught and used.

The Oxford Handbook Of English Law And Literature 1500 1700

Author: Lorna Hutson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0191081981
Size: 45.79 MB
Format: PDF
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This Handbook triangulates the disciplines of history, legal history, and literature to produce a new, interdisciplinary framework for the study of early modern England. For historians of early modern England, turning to legal archives and learning more about legal procedure has seemed increasingly relevant to the project of understanding familial and social relations as well as political institutions, state formation, and economic change. Literary scholars and intellectual historians have also shown how classical forensic rhetoric formed the basis both of the humanist teaching of literary composition (poetry and drama) and of new legal epistemologies of fact-finding and evidence evaluation. In addition, the post-Reformation jurisdictional dominance of the common law produced new ways of drawing the boundaries between private conscience and public accountability. This Handbook brings historians, literary scholars, and legal historians together to build on and challenge these and similar lines of inquiry. Chapters in the Handbook consider the following topics in a variety of combinations: forensic rhetoric, poetics and evidence; humanist and legal learning; political and professional identities at the Inns of Court; poetry, drama, and visual culture; local governance and legal reform; equity, conscience, and religious law; legal transformations of social and affective relations (property, marriage, witchcraft, contract, corporate personhood); authorial liability (libel, censorship, press regulation); rhetorics of liberty, slavery, torture, and due process; nation, sovereignty, and international law (the British archipelago, colonialism, empire).

The Oxford History Of The Laws Of England 1483 1558

Author: John Hamilton Baker
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0198258178
Size: 49.79 MB
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'There can be no doubt that this series will stand as an enduring testament to the sheer fecundity of the contemporary study of English legal history.' -Law Quarterly Review'Despite the mass of scholarship shoe-horned into its pages, great care has been taken that this volume should be reasonably accessible to non-specialists and it is... an excellent volume.' -Law Quarterly ReviewThis, the first volume to appear in the landmark new Oxford History of the Laws of England series, covers the years 1483 - 1558, a period of immense social, political, and intellectual change, which profoundly affected the law and its workings.Readership: Libraries and scholars, some practitioners (changes detailed in this volume are fundamental to an understanding of the common law), historians interested in the early Tudor period, legal historians.