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The Silence Of Great Zimbabwe

Author: Joost Fontein
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315417200
Size: 75.30 MB
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This book examines the politics of landscape and heritage by focusing on the example of Great Zimbabwe National Monument in southern Zimbabwe. The controversy that surrounded the site in the early part of the 20th century, between colonial antiquarians and professional archaeologists, is well reported in the published literature. Based on long term ethnographic field work around Great Zimbabwe, as well as archival research in NMMZ, in the National Archives of Zimbabwe, and several months of research at the World Heritage Centre in Paris, this new book represents an important step beyond that controversy over origins, to focus on the site's position in local contests between, and among individuals within, the Nemanwa, Charumbira and Mugabe clans over land, power and authority. To justify their claims, chiefs, spirit mediums and elders of each clan make appeals to different, but related, constructions of the past. Emphasising the disappearance of the 'Voice' that used to speak there, these narratives also describe the destruction, alienation and desecration of Great Zimbabwe that occurred, and continues, through the international and national, archaeological and heritage processes and practices by which Great Zimbabwe has become a national and world heritage site today.

Places In Motion

Author: Jacob N. Kinnard
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199359660
Size: 27.47 MB
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Jacob Kinnard offers an in-depth examination of the complex dynamics of religiously charged places. Focusing on several important shared and contested pilgrimage places-Ground Zero and Devils Tower in the United States, Ayodhya and Bodhgaya in India, Karbala in Iraq-he poses a number of crucial questions. What and who has made these sites important, and why? How are they shared, and how and why are they contested? What is at stake in their contestation? How are the particular identities of place and space established? How are individual and collective identity intertwined with space and place? Challenging long-accepted, clean divisions of the religious world, Kinnard explores specific instances of the vibrant messiness of religious practice, the multivocality of religious objects, the fluid and hybrid dynamics of religious places, and the shifting and tangled identities of religious actors. He contends that sacred space is a constructed idea: places are not sacred in and of themselves, but are sacred because we make them sacred. As such, they are in perpetual motion, transforming themselves from moment to moment and generation to generation. Places in Motion moves comfortably across and between a variety of historical and cultural settings as well as academic disciplines, providing a deft and sensitive approach to the topic of sacred places, with awareness of political, economic, and social realities as these exist in relation to questions of identity. It is a lively and much needed critical advance in analytical reflections on sacred space and pilgrimage.

Whiteness In Zimbabwe

Author: D. Hughes
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230106331
Size: 77.19 MB
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European settler societies have a long history of establishing a sense of belonging and entitlement outside Europe, but Zimbabwe has proven to be the exception to the rule. Arriving in the 1890s, white settlers never comprised more than a tiny minority. Instead of grafting themselves onto local societies, they adopted a strategy of escape.

Uses Of Heritage

Author: Laurajane Smith
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134368038
Size: 38.26 MB
Format: PDF
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Examining international case studies including USA, Asia, Australia and New Zealand, Laurajane Smith identifies and explores the use of heritage throughout the world. Challenging the idea that heritage value is self-evident, and that things must be preserved because they have an inherent importance, Smith forcefully demonstrates that heritage value is not inherent in physical objects or places, but rather that these objects and places are used to give tangibility to the values that underpin different communities and to assert and affirm these values. A practically grounded accessible examination of heritage as a cultural practice, The Uses of Heritage is global in its benefit to students and field professionals alike.

Contested Cultural Heritage

Author: Helaine Silverman
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781441973054
Size: 71.43 MB
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Cultural heritage is material – tangible and intangible – that signifies a culture’s history or legacy. It has become a venue for contestation, ranging in scale from protesting to violently claimed and destroyed. But who defines what is to be preserved and what is to be erased? As cultural heritage becomes increasingly significant across the world, the number of issues for critical analysis and, hopefully, mediation, arise. The issue stems from various groups: religious, ethnic, national, political, and others come together to claim, appropriate, use, exclude, or erase markers and manifestations of their own and others’ cultural heritage as a means for asserting, defending, or denying critical claims to power, land, and legitimacy. Can cultural heritage be well managed and promoted while at the same time kept within parameters so as to diminish contestation? The cases herein rage from Greece, Spain, Egypt, the UK, Syria, Zimbabwe, Italy, the Balkans, Bénin, and Central America.

Aspects Of Management Planning For Cultural World Heritage Sites

Author: Simon Makuvaza
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319698567
Size: 40.47 MB
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Every site that is inscribed on the World Heritage List (WHL) must have a management plan or some other management system. According to the UNESCO Operational Guidelines, the purpose of a management plan is to ensure the effective protection of the nominated property for present and future generations. This requirement was in part necessitated by the need to implement real systems of monitoring on the management of World Heritage Sites. Since its implementation in 2005, discussion on the function and the contents of management plans for World Heritage Sites has grown tremendously. The discussions have mainly been focused on the theoretical frameworks of World Heritage site management plans and proposals of practical guidelines for their implementation. This volume provides a platform for heritage practitioners, especially those working at Cultural World Heritage Sites, to put in writing their experiences and impressions about the implementation of site management plans at properties that are inscribed on the WHL. Cultural World Heritage Sites in this case refer to world heritage properties such as archaeological sites, cultural landscapes, religious sites and architectural structures. The book also seeks to examine the extent to which site management plans have been or are being implemented at Cultural World Heritage Sites.

Witnesses To History

Author: Lyndel V. Prott
Publisher: UNESCO
ISBN: 9231041282
Size: 11.65 MB
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This Compendium gives an outline of the historical, philosophical and ethical aspects of the return of cultural objects (e.g. cultural objects displaced during war or in colonial contexts), cites past and present cases (Maya Temple Facade, Nigerian Bronzes, United States of America v. Schultz, Parthenon Marbles and many more) and analyses legal issues (bona fide, relevant UNESCO and UNIDROIT Conventions, Supreme Court Decisions, procedure for requests etc.). It is a landmark publication that bears testament to the ways in which peoples have lost their entire cultural heritage and analyses the issue of its return and restitution by providing a wide range of perspectives on this subject. Essential reading for students, specialists, scholars and decision-makers as well as those interested in these topics.

Why Nations Fail

Author: Daron Acemoglu
Publisher: Crown Books
ISBN: 0307719227
Size: 50.42 MB
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An award-winning professor of economics at MIT and a Harvard University political scientist and economist evaluate the reasons that some nations are poor while others succeed, outlining provocative perspectives that support theories about the importance of institutions. Reprint.

Re Imagining Rwanda

Author: Johan Pottier
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521528733
Size: 47.77 MB
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The tragic conflict in Rwanda and the Great Lakes in 1994–1996 attracted the horrified attention of the world's media. Journalists, diplomats and aid workers struggled to find a way to make sense of the bloodshed. Johan Pottier's troubling study shows that the post-genocide regime in Rwanda was able to impose a simple yet persuasive account of Central Africa's crises upon international commentators new to the region, and he explains the ideological underpinnings of this official narrative. He also provides a sobering analysis of the way in which this simple, persuasive, but fatally misleading analysis of the situation on the ground led to policy errors that exacerbated the original crisis. Professor Pottier has extensive field experience in the region, from before and after the genocide, and he has also worked among refugees in eastern Zaire.