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The Spanish Influenza Pandemic Of 1918 1919

Author: David Killingray
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134566409
Size: 54.16 MB
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The Spanish Influenza pandemic of 1918-19 was the worst pandemic of modern times, claiming over 30 million lives in less than six months. In the hardest hit societies, everything else was put aside in a bid to cope with its ravages. It left millions orphaned and medical science desperate to find its cause. Despite the magnitude of its impact, few scholarly attempts have been made to examine this calamity in its many-sided complexity. On a global, multidisciplinary scale, the book seeks to apply the insights of a wide range of social and medical sciences to an investigation of the pandemic. Topics covered include the historiography of the pandemic, its virology, the enormous demographic impact, the medical and governmental responses it elicited, and its long-term effects, particularly the recent attempts to identify the precise causative virus from specimens taken from flu victims in 1918, or victims buried in the Arctic permafrost at that time.

The Spanish Influenza Pandemic Of 1918 1919

Author: Maria Porras-Gallo
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
ISBN: 1580464963
Size: 66.61 MB
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Sheds new light on what the WHO described as "the single most devastating infectious disease outbreak ever recorded," focusing on social control, gender, class, religion, national identity, and military medicine's reactions to the pandemic.

The Spanish Influenza Pandemic Of 1918 19

Author: H. Phillips (Ph. D.)
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415234450
Size: 68.80 MB
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The Spanish Influenza pandemic of 1918-19 was the worst pandemic of modern times, claiming over 30 million lives in less than six months. In the hardest hit societies, everything else was put aside in a bid to cope with its ravages. It left millions orphaned and medical science desperate to find its cause. Despite the magnitude of its impact, few scholarly attempts have been made to examine this calamity in its many-sided complexity. On a global, multidisciplinary scale, the book seeks to apply the insights of a wide range of social and medical sciences to an investigation of the pandemic. Topics covered include the historiography of the pandemic, its virology, the enormous demographic impact, the medical and governmental responses it elicited, and its long-term effects, particularly the recent attempts to identify the precise causative virus from specimens taken from flu victims in 1918, or victims buried in the Arctic permafrost at that time.

The Influenza Pandemic Of 1918 1919

Author: Paul Kupperberg
Publisher: Infobase Publishing
ISBN: 1438103239
Size: 32.43 MB
Format: PDF
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In late January 1918, Dr. Loren Miner, a country physician in rural Kansas, saw the first cases of an influenza of a violent nature. With a warning to the U.S. Public Health Service, his was the lone voice of alarm about the potential spread of this virulent new strain of a particularly deadly disease. With hundreds of thousands of American servicemen crisscrossing the nation through military training camps and then to Europe to fight in World War I, an influenza pandemic wasn't just a possibility, but a certainty. It swept through congested cities and rural communities alike, killing its victims in days, sometimes in hours. No one had ever seen anything like the Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1919. Before the deadly disease ran its course in 1919, more American soldiers died from the flu than in combat, more than one-fifth of the world's population was infected, and as many as 100 million people worldwide died from the disease that caused the most devastating pandemic in history.

Flu

Author: Gina Kolata
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1429979356
Size: 14.72 MB
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The fascinating, true story of the world's deadliest disease. In 1918, the Great Flu Epidemic felled the young and healthy virtually overnight. An estimated forty million people died as the epidemic raged. Children were left orphaned and families were devastated. As many American soldiers were killed by the 1918 flu as were killed in battle during World War I. And no area of the globe was safe. Eskimos living in remote outposts in the frozen tundra were sickened and killed by the flu in such numbers that entire villages were wiped out. Scientists have recently rediscovered shards of the flu virus frozen in Alaska and preserved in scraps of tissue in a government warehouse. Gina Kolata, an acclaimed reporter for The New York Times, unravels the mystery of this lethal virus with the high drama of a great adventure story. Delving into the history of the flu and previous epidemics, detailing the science and the latest understanding of this mortal disease, Kolata addresses the prospects for a great epidemic recurring, and, most important, what can be done to prevent it.

The Spanish Influenza Pandemic Of 1918 1919

Author: David Killingray
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780415510790
Size: 36.96 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 1325
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The Spanish Influenza pandemic of 1918-19 was the worst pandemic of modern times, claiming over 30 million lives in less than six months. In the hardest hit societies, everything else was put aside in a bid to cope with its ravages. It left millions orphaned and medical science desperate to find its cause. Despite the magnitude of its impact, few scholarly attempts have been made to examine this calamity in its many-sided complexity. On a global, multidisciplinary scale, the book seeks to apply the insights of a wide range of social and medical sciences to an investigation of the pandemic. Topics covered include the historiography of the pandemic, its virology, the enormous demographic impact, the medical and governmental responses it elicited, and its long-term effects, particularly the recent attempts to identify the precise causative virus from specimens taken from flu victims in 1918, or victims buried in the Arctic permafrost at that time.

America S Forgotten Pandemic

Author: Alfred W. Crosby
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107394015
Size: 70.81 MB
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Between August 1918 and March 1919 the Spanish influenza spread worldwide, claiming over 25 million lives - more people than perished in the fighting of the First World War. It proved fatal to at least a half-million Americans. Yet, the Spanish flu pandemic is largely forgotten today. In this vivid narrative, Alfred W. Crosby recounts the course of the pandemic during the panic-stricken months of 1918 and 1919, measures its impact on American society, and probes the curious loss of national memory of this cataclysmic event. This 2003 edition includes a preface discussing the then recent outbreaks of diseases, including the Asian flu and the SARS epidemic.

The Great Influenza

Author: John M. Barry
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780143036494
Size: 70.43 MB
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An account of the deadly influenza epidemic of 1918, which took the lives of millions of people around the world, examines its causes, its impact on early twentieth-century society, and the lasting implications of the crisis.

Pale Rider

Author: Laura Spinney
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 1610397681
Size: 79.94 MB
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In 1918, the Italian-Americans of New York, the Yupik of Alaska and the Persians of Mashed had almost nothing in common except for a virus--one that triggered the worst pandemic of modern times and had a decisive effect on the history of the twentieth century. The Spanish flu of 1918-1920 was one of the greatest human disasters of all time. It infected a third of the people on Earth--from the poorest immigrants of New York City to the king of Spain, Franz Kafka, Mahatma Gandhi and Woodrow Wilson. But despite a death toll of between 50 and 100 million people, it exists in our memory as an afterthought to World War I. In this gripping narrative history, Laura Spinney traces the overlooked pandemic to reveal how the virus travelled across the globe, exposing mankind's vulnerability and putting our ingenuity to the test. As socially significant as both world wars, the Spanish flu dramatically disrupted--and often permanently altered--global politics, race relations and family structures, while spurring innovation in medicine, religion and the arts. It was partly responsible, Spinney argues, for pushing India to independence, South Africa to apartheid and Switzerland to the brink of civil war. It also created the true "lost generation." Drawing on the latest research in history, virology, epidemiology, psychology and economics, Pale Rider masterfully recounts the little-known catastrophe that forever changed humanity.