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The Trial Of Tempel Anneke

Author: Peter A. Morton
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442634898
Size: 65.38 MB
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The Trial of Tempel Anneke examines documents from an early modern European witchcraft trial with the pedagogical goal of allowing students to interact directly with primary sources. A brief historiographical essay has been added, along with eleven civic records, including regulations about sorcery, Tempel Anneke's marital agreement, and court salaries, which provide an even clearer picture of life in seventeenth-century Europe. Maps of Harxbüttel and the Holy Roman Empire and lists of key players enable easy reference.

The Trial Of Tempel Anneke

Author: Peter A. Morton
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442634871
Size: 32.61 MB
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Consisting of direct translations of the trial testimony, The Trial of Tempel Anneke allows readers to follow a witchcraft trial from beginning to end.

The Trial Of Tempel Anneke

Author: Peter Alan Morton
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9781551117065
Size: 15.56 MB
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"This is a fascinating and important book." - Moshe Sluhovsky, California State University, Long Beach

Magic And Superstition In Europe

Author: Michael David Bailey
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742533875
Size: 70.29 MB
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The only comprehensive, single-volume survey of magic available, this compelling book traces the history of magic and superstition in Europe from antiquity to the present. Focusing mainly on the medieval and early modern era, Michael Bailey also explores the ancient Near East, classical Greece and Rome, and the spread of magical systems_particularly modern witchcraft or Wicca_from Europe to the United States. He explains how magic was understood, constructed, and frequently condemned and how magical beliefs and practices have changed over time yet also remain vital even today.

Languages Of Witchcraft

Author: Stuart Clark
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 033398529X
Size: 75.39 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Different conceptions of the world and of reality have made witchcraft possible in some societies and impossible in others. How did the people of Early Modern Europe experience it and what was its place in their culture? The essays in this collection illustrate trends in witchcraft research and in cultural history in general. After decades in which the social analysis of witchcraft accusations has dominated the subject, this study looks at its significance and meaning as a cultural phenomenon - to the languages of witchcraft, rather than its causes.

Fiction In The Archives

Author: Natalie Zemon Davis
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804717991
Size: 20.22 MB
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To receive a royal pardon in sixteenth-century France for certain kinds of homicide--unpremeditated, unintended, in self-defense, or otherwise excusable--a supplicant had to tell the king a story. These stories took the form of letters of remission, documents narrated to royal notaries by admitted offenders who, in effect, stated their case for pardon to the king. Thousands of such stories are found in French archives, providing precious evidence of the narrative skills and interpretive schemes of peasants and artisans as well as the well-born. This book, by one of the most acclaimed historians of our time, is a pioneering effort to us the tools of literary analysis to interpret archival texts: to show how people from different stations in life shaped the events of a crime into a story, and to compare their stories with those told by Renaissance authors not intended to judge the truth or falsity of the pardon narratives, but rather to refer to the techniques for crafting stories. A number of fascinating crime stories, often possessing Rabelaisian humor, are told in the course of the book, which consists of three long chapters. These chapters explore the French law of homicide, depictions of "hot anger" and self-defense, and the distinctive characteristics of women's stories of bloodshed. The book is illustrated with seven contemporary woodcuts and a facsimile of a letter of remission, with appendixes providing several other original documents. This volume is based on the Harry Camp Memorial Lectures given at Stanford University in 1986.

Memoirs Of A Courtesan In Nineteenth Century Paris

Author: comtesse Cäleste Vänard de Chabrillan
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803282735
Size: 16.25 MB
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When Cäleste Mogador's memoirs were first published in 1854 and again in 1858, they were immediately seized and condemned as immoral and unsuitable for public consumption. For a reader in our more forgiving times, this extraordinary document offers not only a portrait of the early life of an intelligent, courageous, and infinitely intriguing Frenchwoman but also an exceedingly rare inside look at the world of the courtesans and prostitutes of nineteenth-century France. ø Writing to conciliate judges and creditors, Mogador (born Cäleste Venard in 1824) explains how with tenacity, wit, and audacity, she managed to escape a difficult childhood and subsequent life of prostitution to become, successively, a darling of the dance halls, a circus rider, and an actress, all the while attracting wealthy young men who vied for her favor. Although her account gives readers a peek into the rakish demimonde made famous by Verdi's opera La Traviata, its greatest value lies in its candid picture of a spunky, self-educated woman who doggedly transformed herself into an esteemed and prolific novelist and playwright, who fell in love with a count and married him, and who made her name synonymous with the bohemian life of the 1840s and 1850s in Paris.

A Tale Of Two Murders

Author: James R. Farr
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 082238714X
Size: 37.27 MB
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As scandalous as any modern-day celebrity murder trial, the “Giroux affair” was a maelstrom of intrigue, encompassing daggers, poison, adultery, archenemies, servants, royalty, and legal proceedings that reached the pinnacle of seventeenth-century French society. In 1638 Philippe Giroux, a judge in the highest royal court of Burgundy, allegedly murdered his equally powerful cousin, Pierre Baillet, and Baillet’s valet, Philibert Neugot. The murders were all the more shocking because they were surrounded by accusations (particularly that Giroux had been carrying on a passionate affair with Baillet’s wife), conspiracy theories (including allegations that Giroux tried to poison his mother-in-law), and unexplained deaths (Giroux’s wife and her physician died under suspicious circumstances). The trial lasted from 1639 until 1643 and came to involve many of the most distinguished and influential men in France, among them the prince of Condé, Henri II Bourbon; the prime minister, Cardinal Richelieu; and King Louis XIII. James R. Farr reveals the Giroux affair not only as a riveting murder mystery but also as an illuminating point of entry into the dynamics of power, justice, and law in seventeenth-century France. Drawing on the voluminous trial records, Farr uses Giroux’s experience in the court system to trace the mechanisms of power—both the formal power vested by law in judicial officials and the informal power exerted by the nobility through patron-client relationships. He does not take a position on Giroux’s guilt or innocence. Instead, he allows readers to draw their own conclusions about who did what to whom on that ill-fated evening in 1638.

Architecture In Context

Author: Hassan Radoine
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118719883
Size: 39.37 MB
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Architects are building in the Gulf and across the Middle East as if there were no context. The iconic abstract architecture that dominates current worldwide architectural discourse and practice is being replicated across the Middle East, even in countries that have rich past and current architectural and urban landscapes. Students of architecture and practising architects in the region are also being taught from solely foreign historicist or modernist surveys that may not be directly relevant to the context in which they are designing. This book explores the environmental significance, cultural meaning and design vocabularies of architecture across the region. Architecture in Context: Designing in the Middle East critically provides a foundation for understanding the cultural context of architecture and design in this region. It does this by: presenting a practical overview of architectural know-how in the Middle East, and its potential for cultivating a sense of place introducing local architectural vocabularies and styles, and how they can still be reactivated in contemporary design exploring the cultural and contextual meaning of forms as references that may influence contemporary architecture discussing important discourses and trends in architecture that allow a rethinking of the current global/local dichotomy. Highly illustrated, the book covers architecture and design in North Africa, the Levant, the Gulf, and Turkey, Iran and Iraq.

The Consumption Of Justice

Author: Daniel Lord Smail
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801468779
Size: 60.92 MB
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In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, the ideas and practices of justice in Europe underwent significant change as procedures were transformed and criminal and civil caseloads grew apace. Drawing on the rich judicial records of Marseille from the years 1264 to 1423, especially records of civil litigation, this book approaches the courts of law from the perspective of the users of the courts (the consumers of justice) and explains why men and women chose to invest resources in the law. Daniel Lord Smail shows that the courts were quickly adopted as a public stage on which litigants could take revenge on their enemies. Even as the new legal system served the interest of royal or communal authority, it also provided the consumers of justice with a way to broadcast their hatreds and social sanctions to a wider audience and negotiate their own community standing in the process. The emotions that had driven bloodfeuds and other forms of customary vengeance thus never went away, and instead were fully incorporated into the new procedures.