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The Virtual Window

Author: Anne Friedberg
Publisher: MIT Press (MA)
ISBN: 9780262512503
Size: 76.85 MB
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From the Renaissance idea of the painting as an open window to the nested windows andmultiple images on today's cinema, television, and computer screens: a cultural history of themetaphoric, literal, and virtual window.

Screens

Author: Kate Mondloch
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 0816665214
Size: 11.45 MB
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Media screens—film, video, and computer screens—have increasingly pervaded both artistic production and everyday life since the 1960s. Yet the nature of viewing artworks made from these media, along with their subjective effects, remains largely unexplored. Screens addresses this gap, offering a historical and theoretical framework for understanding screen-reliant installation art and the spectatorship it evokes.Examining a range of installations created over the past fifty years that investigate the rich terrain between the sculptural and the cinematic, including works by artists such as Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Doug Aitken, Peter Campus, Dan Graham, VALIE EXPORT, Bruce Nauman, and Michael Snow, Kate Mondloch traces the construction of screen spectatorship in art from the seminal film and video installations of the 1960s and 1970s to the new media artworks of today’s digital culture.Mondloch identifies a momentous shift in contemporary art that challenges key premises of spectatorship brought about by technological objects that literally and metaphorically filter the subject’s field of vision. As a result she proposes that contemporary viewers are, quite literally, screen subjects and offers the unique critical leverage of art as an alternative way to understand media culture and contemporary visuality.

Cinematic Appeals

Author: Ariel Rogers
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231535783
Size: 21.37 MB
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Cinematic Appeals follows the effect of technological innovation on the cinema experience, specifically the introduction of widescreen and stereoscopic 3D systems in the 1950s, the rise of digital cinema in the 1990s, and the transition to digital 3D since 2005. Widescreen cinema promised to draw the viewer into the world of the screen, enabling larger-than-life close-ups of already larger-than-life actors. This technology fostered the illusion of physically entering a film, enhancing the semblance of realism. Alternatively, the digital era was less concerned with the viewer's physical response and more with information flow, awe, and the reevaluation of spatiality and embodiment. This study ultimately shows how cinematic technology and the human experience shape and respond to each other over time.

Video

Author: Yvonne Spielmann
Publisher: Mit Press
ISBN: 9780262515177
Size: 48.61 MB
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An argument that video is not merely an intermediate stage between analog and digitalbut a medium in its own right; traces the theoretical genealogy of video and examines the differentconcepts of video seen in works by Vito Acconci, Ulrike Rosenbach, Steina and Woody Vasulka, andothers.

Window Shopping

Author: Anne Friedberg
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520089243
Size: 19.68 MB
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"Friedberg's idea of the 'mobilized virtual gaze' may become the way we conceive of postmodern subjectivity. This book is in a class by itself."—Linda Hutcheon, author of The Politics of Postmodernism

Picturing Space Displacing Bodies

Author: Lyle Massey
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271029803
Size: 65.97 MB
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In Picturing Space, Displacing Bodies, Lyle Massey argues that we can only learn how and why certain kinds of spatial representation prevailed over others by carefully considering how Renaissance artists and theorists interpreted perspective. Combining detailed historical studies with broad theoretical and philosophical investigations, this book challenges basic assumptions about the way early modern artists and theorists represented their relationship to the visible world and how they understood these representations. By analyzing technical feats such as anamorphosis (the perspectival distortion of an object to make it viewable only from a certain angle), drawing machines, and printed diagrams, each chapter highlights the moments when perspective theorists failed to unite a singular, ideal viewpoint with the artist&’s or viewer&’s viewpoint or were unsuccessful at conjoining fictive and lived space.Showing how these &“failures&” were subsequently incorporated rather than rejected by perspective theorists, the book presents an important reassessment of the standard view of Renaissance perspective. While many scholars have maintained that perspective rationalized the relationships among optics, space, and painting, Picturing Space, Displacing Bodies asserts instead that Renaissance and early modern theorists often revealed a disjunction between geometrical ideals and practical applications. In some cases, they not only identified but also exploited these discrepancies. This discussion of perspective shows that the painter&’s geometry did not always conform to the explicitly rational, Cartesian formula that so many have assumed, nor did it historically unfold according to a standard account of scientific development.

A Prehistory Of The Cloud

Author: Tung-Hui Hu
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262330105
Size: 37.52 MB
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We may imagine the digital cloud as placeless, mute, ethereal, and unmediated. Yet the reality of the cloud is embodied in thousands of massive data centers, any one of which can use as much electricity as a midsized town. Even all these data centers are only one small part of the cloud. Behind that cloud-shaped icon on our screens is a whole universe of technologies and cultural norms, all working to keep us from noticing their existence. In this book, Tung-Hui Hu examines the gap between the real and the virtual in our understanding of the cloud. Hu shows that the cloud grew out of such older networks as railroad tracks, sewer lines, and television circuits. He describes key moments in the prehistory of the cloud, from the game "Spacewar" as exemplar of time-sharing computers to Cold War bunkers that were later reused as data centers. Countering the popular perception of a new "cloudlike" political power that is dispersed and immaterial, Hu argues that the cloud grafts digital technologies onto older ways of exerting power over a population. But because we invest the cloud with cultural fantasies about security and participation, we fail to recognize its militarized origins and ideology. Moving between the materiality of the technology itself and its cultural rhetoric, Hu's account offers a set of new tools for rethinking the contemporary digital environment.

What Sound Does A Color Make

Author: Kathleen Forde
Publisher: Independent Curators
ISBN: 9780916365714
Size: 80.40 MB
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Explores the subject of synesthesia in contemporary electronic art, where sound and visual stimuli seemingly fuse together in immersive sensory environments. Connecting recent developments in digital audiovisual art to their predigital roots, this exhibition provokes a renewed awareness of human cognition and perception through a selection of compelling works by an international group of artists

Exhibiting Cinema In Contemporary Art

Author: Erika Balsom
Publisher: Amsterdam University Press
ISBN: 9048517761
Size: 78.75 MB
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Whether it involves remaking an old Hollywood movie, projecting a quiet 16mm film, or constructing a bombastic multi-screen environment, cinema now takes place not just in the movie theatre and the home, but also in the art gallery and the museum. The author of this engaging study takes stock of this development, offering an in-depth inquiry into its genesis, its defining features, and the ramifications it has for art and cinema alike. Through the lens of contemporary art history, she examines cinema studies great disciplinary obsession namely, what cinema was, is, and will become in a digital future.

Updating To Remain The Same

Author: Wendy Hui Kyong Chun
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262333783
Size: 69.63 MB
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New media -- we are told -- exist at the bleeding edge of obsolescence. We thus forever try to catch up, updating to remain the same. Meanwhile, analytic, creative, and commercial efforts focus exclusively on the next big thing: figuring out what will spread and who will spread it the fastest. But what do we miss in this constant push to the future? In Updating to Remain the Same, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun suggests another approach, arguing that our media matter most when they seem not to matter at all -- when they have moved from "new" to habitual. Smart phones, for example, no longer amaze, but they increasingly structure and monitor our lives. Through habits, Chun says, new media become embedded in our lives -- indeed, we become our machines: we stream, update, capture, upload, link, save, trash, and troll. Chun links habits to the rise of networks as the defining concept of our era. Networks have been central to the emergence of neoliberalism, replacing "society" with groupings of individuals and connectable "YOUS." (For isn't "new media" actually "NYOU media"?) Habit is central to the inversion of privacy and publicity that drives neoliberalism and networks. Why do we view our networked devices as "personal" when they are so chatty and promiscuous? What would happen, Chun asks, if, rather than pushing for privacy that is no privacy, we demanded public rights -- the right to be exposed, to take risks and to be in public and not be attacked?