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The Wests Of Texas

Author: Bruce Shackelford
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1625110316
Size: 49.37 MB
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With the Wests of Texas, noted author Bruce M. Shackelford tells the story of the West family of Lavaca County, forgotten Texas legends. Originally from Tennessee, Washington and Mary West moved to Lavaca County, Texas, in the early 1850s. There they raised three sons who were destined to leave an indelible mark on the Texas cattle industry. At the end of the Civil War, George, the eldest, made his first trail drives as so many Texans did. But unlike many who made the trip, George saw the venture as the business of moving cattle to market and became a professional drover. As his brothers Sol and Ike came of age, George brought them into his already growing business of trailing cattle herds north. The brothers became some of the most important drovers in cattle business, standing out during the era of the great trail drives. In their lifetimes their accomplishments were legendary, but today they have been largely forgotten. Their history and achievements are examined in this beautiful volume illustrated with photographs and personal effects from the family.

Red Meat Republic

Author: Joshua Specht
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691185786
Size: 64.66 MB
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How beef conquered America and gave rise to the modern industrial food complex By the late nineteenth century, Americans rich and poor had come to expect high-quality fresh beef with almost every meal. Beef production in the United States had gone from small-scale, localized operations to a highly centralized industry spanning the country, with cattle bred on ranches in the rural West, slaughtered in Chicago, and consumed in the nation’s rapidly growing cities. Red Meat Republic tells the remarkable story of the violent conflict over who would reap the benefits of this new industry and who would bear its heavy costs. Joshua Specht puts people at the heart of his story—the big cattle ranchers who helped to drive the nation’s westward expansion, the meatpackers who created a radically new kind of industrialized slaughterhouse, and the stockyard workers who were subjected to the shocking and unsanitary conditions described by Upton Sinclair in his novel The Jungle. Specht brings to life a turbulent era marked by Indian wars, Chicago labor unrest, and food riots in the streets of New York. He shows how the enduring success of the cattle-beef complex—centralized, low cost, and meatpacker dominated—was a consequence of the meatpackers’ ability to make their interests overlap with those of a hungry public, while the interests of struggling ranchers, desperate workers, and bankrupt butchers took a backseat. America—and the American table—would never be the same again. A compelling and unfailingly enjoyable read, Red Meat Republic reveals the complex history of exploitation and innovation behind the food we consume today.

Cattle Ranchers

Author: Harriet Upton
Publisher: Rourke Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780866253727
Size: 33.71 MB
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Discusses the significance of the early cattle ranchers to the development of the Wild West.

Great Debates In American Environmental History

Author: Brian Black
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780313339325
Size: 25.24 MB
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Examines the most important and controversial environmental issues in the history of the United States, from the Colonial period to the present. Describes the issues, the stakeholders of various positions, and both the immediate outcome of the debate, and the long-term consequences of the result.

Women Writers Of The American West 1833 1927

Author: Nina Baym
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252078845
Size: 53.95 MB
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Women Writers of the American West, 1833-1927 recovers the names and works of hundreds of women who wrote about the American West during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, some of them long forgotten and others better known novelists, poets, memoirists, and historians such as Willa Cather and Mary Austin Holley. Nina Baym mined literary and cultural histories, anthologies, scholarly essays, catalogs, advertisements, and online resources to debunk critical assumptions that women did not publish about the West as much as they did about other regions. Elucidating a substantial body of nearly 650 books of all kinds by more than 300 writers, Baym reveals how the authors showed women making lives for themselves in the West, how they represented the diverse region, and how they represented themselves. Baym accounts for a wide range of genres and geographies, affirming that the literature of the West was always more than cowboy tales and dime novels. Nor did the West consist of a single landscape, as women living in the expanses of Texas saw a different world from that seen by women in gold rush California. Although many women writers of the American West accepted domestic agendas crucial to the development of families, farms, and businesses, they also found ways to be forceful agents of change, whether by taking on political positions, deriding male arrogance, or, as their voluminous published works show, speaking out when they were expected to be silent. Nina Baym is a professor emeritus of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The general editor of The Norton Anthology of American Literature, she has written several books on nineteenth-century women writers, beginning with Woman's Fiction: A Guide to Novels by and about Women in America, 1820-70.

Fresh

Author: Susanne Freidberg
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674032918
Size: 20.79 MB
Format: PDF
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That rosy tomato perched on your plate in December is at the end of a great journey - not just over land and sea, but across a vast and varied cultural history. This is the territory charted in Fresh. Freidberg takes six common foods from the refrigerator to discover what each has to say about our notions of freshness. Local livelihoods; global trade; the politics of taste, community, and environmental change: all enter into this lively, surprising, yet sobering tale about the nature and cost of our hunger for freshness.

Out Of Many

Author: John Mack Faragher
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 35.49 MB
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The "Out of Many Teaching and Learning Classroom Edition "brings together a wide array of assets to provide a completely integrated multimedia learning experience. This path breaking text weaves together the complex interaction of social, political, and historical forces that have shaped the United States and from which the American people have evolved by telling stories of people and of the nation and emphasizing that American history has never been the preserve of any particular region. The text' s trademark continental approach has been expanded to incorporate a greater hemispheric perspective, while community and memory feature analyzes the role and the conflict of historical memory in shaping communities' understanding of the past. For individuals interested in United States history.

Awakening Spirits

Author: Richard P. Reading
Publisher: Fulcrum Pub
ISBN:
Size: 16.16 MB
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How and why we should save wolves in the Southern Rockies.