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The White Cascade

Author: Gary Krist
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 9781429905701
Size: 57.55 MB
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The never-before-told story of one of the worst rail disasters in U.S. history in which two trains full of people, trapped high in the Cascade Mountains, are hit by a devastating avalanche In February 1910, a monstrous blizzard centered on Washington State hit the Northwest, breaking records. The world stopped—but nowhere was the danger more terrifying than near a tiny town called Wellington, perched high in the Cascade Mountains, where a desperate situation evolved minute by minute: two trainloads of cold, hungry passengers and their crews found themselves marooned without escape, their railcars gradually being buried in the rising drifts. For days, an army of the Great Northern Railroad's most dedicated men—led by the line's legendarily courageous superintendent, James O'Neill—worked round-the-clock to rescue the trains. But the storm was unrelenting, and to the passenger's great anxiety, the railcars—their only shelter—were parked precariously on the edge of a steep ravine. As the days passed, food and coal supplies dwindled. Panic and rage set in as snow accumulated deeper and deeper on the cliffs overhanging the trains. Finally, just when escape seemed possible, the unthinkable occurred: the earth shifted and a colossal avalanche tumbled from the high pinnacles, sweeping the trains and their sleeping passengers over the steep slope and down the mountainside. Centered on the astonishing spectacle of our nation's deadliest avalanche, The White Cascade is the masterfully told story of a supremely dramatic and never-before-documented American tragedy. An adventure saga filled with colorful and engaging history, this is epic narrative storytelling at its finest.

The White Cascade

Author: Gary Krist
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780805077056
Size: 74.10 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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"In February 1910, a monstrous blizzard hit Washington State. High in the Cascade Mountains near the tiny town of Wellington, two trainloads of cold, hungry passengers and their crews found their railcars buried in rising drifts, parked precariously on th

The Great Northern Railway

Author:
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 1452907102
Size: 64.51 MB
Format: PDF
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Written by historians at Harvard Business School, Mississippi State U., and St. Cloud State U. (Minn.), this history details the development and day- to-day affairs of this powerful business, and the careers of the main figures instrumental in its operation. This definitive work, first published by

Vis Major

Author: Martin Burwash
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 144016178X
Size: 23.31 MB
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At 1:43 a.m., March 1, 1910, a wall of snow descended on two Great Northern Railway trains stalled in the town of Wellington, Washington. Ninety-six people died in a single moment. To this day, the Wellington Slide remains North America’s worst avalanche disaster. Although other accounts of this monumental event exist, none are told entirely from the perspective of the railroad men who battled the week-long blizzard leading up to the tragedy. Vis Major gives voice to those men. With vivid imagery and evocative prose, historian Martin Burwash brings railroaders from Cascade Division Superintendent James O’Neill to brakeman Anthony John Dougherty to brilliant life. Relive the crucial moments where men worked feverishly to clear the snow-clogged line over Washington’s Stevens Pass and intimately feel the fatigue, frustration, and misery of working hours upon hours in the harsh winter weather or aboard steaming rotary snow plows. Expertly blending historical fact with railroad knowledge, Burwash delivers an amazing fictional account of this incredible, but often overlooked true event and simultaneously reveals the courage and fortitude of the human spirit.

Sudden Sea

Author: R.A. Scotti
Publisher: Back Bay Books
ISBN: 031605478X
Size: 40.10 MB
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The massive destruction wreaked by the Hurricane of 1938 dwarfed that of the Chicago Fire, the San Francisco Earthquake, and the Mississippi floods of 1927, making the storm the worst natural disaster in U.S. history. Now, R.A. Scotti tells the story.

Firestorm At Peshtigo

Author: Denise Gess
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780805072938
Size: 24.27 MB
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Re-creates the events of the most devastating fire in American history, documenting the conflagration that swept through Peshtigo, Wisconsin, on October 8, 1871--the same night as the Great Chicago Fire--incinerating more than 2,400 square miles of land, obliterating Peshtigo, and killing more than two thousand people. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.

Washington Avalanche 1910

Author: Cameron Dokey
Publisher: Simon Pulse
ISBN: 9780671036041
Size: 34.22 MB
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On a long train ride to Seattle, Ginny swaps identities with a woman who doesn't want to marry a man she has never seen, but their innocent ploy is threatened when an avalanche engulfs the train.

Stevens Pass

Author: JoAnn Roe
Publisher: Caxton Press
ISBN: 9780870044281
Size: 15.76 MB
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Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press for Caxton Press The history of the opening of Stevens Pass through the northern Cascades into the Seattle region is a saga of nearly superhuman feats by railroad construction crews, ghastly design mistakes, natural catastrophes, and the determination of railroad owners to connect isolated communities.

City Of Scoundrels

Author: Gary Krist
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0307454312
Size: 47.44 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The masterfully told story of twelve volatile days in the life of Chicago, when an aviation disaster, a race riot, a crippling transit strike, and a sensational child murder transfixed and roiled a city already on the brink of collapse. When 1919 began, the city of Chicago seemed on the verge of transformation. Modernizers had an audacious, expensive plan to turn the city from a brawling, unglamorous place into "the Metropolis of the World." But just as the dream seemed within reach, pandemonium broke loose and the city's highest ambitions were suddenly under attack by the same unbridled energies that had given birth to them in the first place. It began on a balmy Monday afternoon when a blimp in flames crashed through the roof of a busy downtown bank, incinerating those inside. Within days, a racial incident at a hot, crowded South Side beach spiraled into one of the worst urban riots in American history, followed by a transit strike that paralyzed the city. Then, when it seemed as if things could get no worse, police searching for a six-year-old girl discovered her body in a dark North Side basement. Meticulously researched and expertly paced, City of Scoundrels captures the tumultuous birth of the modern American city, with all of its light and dark aspects in vivid relief.

Under A Flaming Sky

Author: Daniel Brown
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1493022016
Size: 19.65 MB
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On September 1, 1894 two forest fires converged on the town of Hinckley, Minnesota, trapping over 2,000 people. Daniel J. Brown recounts the events surrounding the fire in the first and only book on to chronicle the dramatic story that unfolded. Whereas Oregon's famous "Biscuit" fire in 2002 burned 350,000 acres in one week, the Hinckley fire did the same damage in five hours. The fire created its own weather, including hurricane-strength winds, bubbles of plasma-like glowing gas, and 200-foot-tall flames. In some instances, "fire whirls," or tornadoes of fire, danced out from the main body of the fire to knock down buildings and carry flaming debris into the sky. Temperatures reached 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit--the melting point of steel. As the fire surrounded the town, two railroads became the only means of escape. Two trains ran the gauntlet of fire. One train caught on fire from one end to the other. The heroic young African-American porter ran up and down the length of the train, reassuring the passengers even as the flames tore at their clothes. On the other train, the engineer refused to back his locomotive out of town until the last possible minute of escape. In all, more than 400 people died, leading to a revolution in forestry management practices and federal agencies that monitor and fight wildfires today. Author Daniel Brown has woven together numerous survivors' stories, historical sources, and interviews with forest fire experts in a gripping narrative that tells the fascinating story of one of North America's most devastating fires and how it changed the nation.