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The White Shaman Mural

Author: Carolyn E. Boyd
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 1477311203
Size: 37.55 MB
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The prehistoric hunter-gatherers of the Lower Pecos Canyonlands of Texas and Coahuila, Mexico, created some of the most spectacularly complex, colorful, extensive, and enduring rock art of the ancient world. Perhaps the greatest of these masterpieces is the White Shaman mural, an intricate painting that spans some twenty-six feet in length and thirteen feet in height on the wall of a shallow cave overlooking the Pecos River. In The White Shaman Mural, Carolyn E. Boyd takes us on a journey of discovery as she builds a convincing case that the mural tells a story of the birth of the sun and the beginning of time—making it possibly the oldest pictorial creation narrative in North America. Unlike previous scholars who have viewed Pecos rock art as random and indecipherable, Boyd demonstrates that the White Shaman mural was intentionally composed as a visual narrative, using a graphic vocabulary of images to communicate multiple levels of meaning and function. Drawing on twenty-five years of archaeological research and analysis, as well as insights from ethnohistory and art history, Boyd identifies patterns in the imagery that equate, in stunning detail, to the mythologies of Uto-Aztecan-speaking peoples, including the ancient Aztec and the present-day Huichol. This paradigm-shifting identification of core Mesoamerican beliefs in the Pecos rock art reveals that a shared ideological universe was already firmly established among foragers living in the Lower Pecos region as long as four thousand years ago.

Rock Art Of The Lower Pecos

Author: Carolyn E. Boyd
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781585442591
Size: 69.96 MB
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Four thousand years ago bands of hunter-gatherers lived in and traveled through the challenging terrain of what is now southwest Texas and northern Mexico. Today travelers to that land can view large art panels they left behind on the rock walls of Rattlesnake Canyon, White Shaman Cave, Panther Cave, Mystic Shelter, and Cedar Springs. Messages from a distant past, they are now interpreted for modern readers by artist-archaeologist Carolyn Boyd. It has been thought that the meaning of this ancient art was lost with the artists who produced it. However, thanks to research breakthroughs, these elaborate rock paintings are again communicating a narrative that was inaccessible to humanity for millennia. In the gateway serpents, antlered shamans, and human-animal–cross forms pictured in these ancient murals, Boyd sees a way that ancient hunter-gatherer artists could express their belief systems, provide a mechanism for social and environmental adaptation, and act as agents in the social, economic, and ideological affairs of the community. She offers detailed information gleaned from the art regarding the nature of the lower Pecos cosmos, ritual practices involving the use of sacramental and medicinal plants, and hunter-gatherer lifeways. Now, combining the tools of the ethnologist with the aesthetic sensibilities of an artist, Boyd demonstrates that prehistoric art is not beyond explanation. Images from the past contain a vast corpus of data—accessible through proven, scientific methods—that can enrich our understanding of human life in prehistory and, at the same time, expand our appreciation for the work of art in the present and the future.

Ancient Texans

Author: Harry J. Shafer
Publisher: Texas Monthly Press
ISBN:
Size: 36.86 MB
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Reconstructs the life of the prehistoric inhabitants of Texas and describes Texas archaeological efforts

Painters In Prehistory

Author: Harry J. Shafer
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781595340863
Size: 49.11 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"The remnants of prehistoric Lower Pecos people reveal lifeways unlike those anywhere in the world. The people who inhabited what is now Texas left artifacts that provide information about 12,000 years of existence, the last 7,000 of which are still astoundingly evident. Includes maps, charts, tables, photographs, and drawings"--Provided by publisher.

Rock Art

Author: Stewart M. Green
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 149301708X
Size: 21.92 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Definitive Guide to Ancient and Contemporary Rock Art! Rock Art explores the fascinating history of ancient human-made stone markings that have puzzled historians, archaeologists, and hikers alike for centuries. What is rock art, and who created these mysterious symbols, and why are so many pieces of artwork similar across disparate and long-forgotten cultures? How was rock art made—and, more importantly, why? These questions and more are addressed in this comprehensive guide, complete with full-color images and travel listings. Look inside to find: Prehistories and histories of the cultures who created these images and etchings. Detailed descriptions of the tools, techniques, and methods used to create rock art. Best practices and techniques for photographing these alluring rock images. Extensive list of rock art sites across the United States. Whether you’re fascinated by the wondrous ancient imagery imprinted on the landscape or just curious about the markings alongside your favorite hiking trail, Rock Art is the only guide you need to better understand this mysterious and beautiful art form.

The Oxford Handbook Of The Archaeology And Anthropology Of Rock Art

Author: Bruno David
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190844957
Size: 43.10 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Rock art is one of the most visible and geographically widespread of cultural expressions, and it spans much of the period of our species' existence. Rock art also provides rare and often unique insights into the minds and visually creative capacities of our ancestors and how selected rock outcrops with distinctive images were used to construct symbolic landscapes and shape worldviews. Equally important, rock art is often central to the expression of and engagement with spiritual entities and forces, and in all these dimensions it signals the diversity of cultural practices, across place and through time. Over the past 150 years, archaeologists have studied ancient arts on rock surfaces, both out in the open and within caves and rock shelters, and social anthropologists have revealed how people today use art in their daily lives. The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Rock Art showcases examples of such research from around the world and across a broad range of cultural contexts, giving a sense of the art's regional variability, its antiquity, and how it is meaningful to people in the recent past and today - including how we have ourselves tended to make sense of the art of others, replete with our own preconceptions. It reviews past, present, and emerging theoretical approaches to rock art investigation and presents new, cutting-edge methods of rock art analysis for the student and professional researcher alike.

The Rock Art Of Texas Indians

Author: Forrest Kirkland
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780292753266
Size: 55.11 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The petroglyphs and pictographs reproduced here, states Professor Newcomb, "are relatively rare and absolutely irreplaceable human documents. They can often reveal much about the ways of ancient men, including aspects of life which otherwise would forever go unrecorded, for they may illustrate how a vanished, nameless people perceived themselves and their world, their relation to God and to each other, and their fantasies and fears. They are, then, a treasure to be valued and a heritage to be preserved."

Stone Artifacts Of Texas Indians

Author: Ellen Sue Turner
Publisher: Taylor Trade Publications
ISBN: 9781589794658
Size: 12.23 MB
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Useful for academic and recreational archaeologists alike, this book identifies and describes over 200 projectile points and stone tools used by prehistoric Native American Indians in Texas. This third edition boasts twice as many illustrations—all drawn from actual specimens—and still includes charts, geographic distribution maps and reliable age-dating information. The authors also demonstrate how factors such as environment, locale and type of artifact combine to produce a portrait of theses ancient cultures.

Kennewick Man

Author: Douglas W. Owsley
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1623492343
Size: 22.46 MB
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Almost from the day of its accidental discovery along the banks of the Columbia River in Washington State in July 1996, the ancient skeleton of Kennewick Man has garnered significant attention from scientific and Native American communities as well as public media outlets. This volume represents a collaboration among physical and forensic anthropologists, archaeologists, geologists, and geochemists, among others, and presents the results of the scientific study of this remarkable find. Scholars address a range of topics, from basic aspects of osteological analysis to advanced ?research focused on Kennewick Man’s origins and his relationships to other populations. Interdisciplinary studies, comprehensive data collection and preservation, and applications of technology are all critical to telling Kennewick Man’s story. Kennewick Man: The Scientific Investigation of an Ancient American Skeleton is written for a discerning professional audience, yet the absorbing story of the remains, their discovery, their curation history, and the extensive amount of detail that skilled scientists have been able to glean from them will appeal to interested and informed general readers. These bones lay silent for nearly nine thousand years, but now, with the aid of dedicated researchers, they can speak about the life of one of the earliest human occupants of North America.

Texas Blood

Author: Roger D. Hodge
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307961419
Size: 64.14 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In the tradition of Ian Frazier's Great Plains, and as vivid as the work of Cormac McCarthy, an intoxicating, singularly illuminating history of the Texas borderlands from their settlement through seven generations of Roger D. Hodge's ranching family. What brought the author's family to Texas? What is it about Texas that for centuries has exerted a powerful allure for adventurers and scoundrels, dreamers and desperate souls, outlaws and outliers? In search of answers, Hodge travels across his home state--which he loves and hates in shifting measure--tracing the wanderings of his ancestors into forgotten histories along vanished roads. Here is an unsentimental, keenly insightful attempt to grapple with all that makes Texas so magical, punishing, and polarizing. Here is a spellbindingly evocative portrait of the borderlands--with its brutal history of colonization, conquest, and genocide; where stories of death and drugs and desperation play out daily. And here is a contemplation of what it means that the ranching industry that has sustained families like Hodge's for almost two centuries is quickly fading away, taking with it a part of our larger, deep-rooted cultural inheritance. A wholly original fusion of memoir and history--as piercing as it is elegiac--Texas Blood is a triumph.